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Diy Kiln Vent


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#1 MichaelP

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 04:26 PM

I just want to share a few photos of my kiln vent project.

 

The pin and its bushing were machined out of mild steel. The round foot - aluminum.

I didn't machine the circular top collar: I just found it in my scrap bin and used "as is" (the holes drilled in the collar do not interfere with its function, so I just left them alone).

 

I used the vent during several firings, then sandblasted the newly formed rust away and painted everything to finish the project. The pin was not painted. I blackened it to protect against rusting (it was heated, and used machine oil was rubbed into the surface). It looks like rust on the photos, but it's not. The inside of the bushing should be done the same way.

 

As you can see, magnets are used to regulate fresh air intake.

 

P.S. If I ever make one again, I'll use aluminum or stainless steel for everything (except the connection to the galvanized exhaust). Naturally, I'll have to make some kind of shutters instead of magnets then. This would require no painting and won't rust.

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#2 neilestrick

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 07:31 PM

Nicely done!
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#3 Denice

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 11:01 PM

Very professional and industrial.  Denice



#4 MichaelP

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 03:56 PM

Thank you for the words of encouragement.

 

And a sepatate "thank you" to Neil for allowing me to check suction in his kiln...and many other things. :)



#5 neilestrick

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:35 AM

Thank you for the words of encouragement.

 

And a sepatate "thank you" to Neil for allowing me to check suction in his kiln...and many other things.  :)

 

Any time. Hope you had a great holiday season!


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#6 joshur

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 01:03 PM

I used  aluminum dryer duct for for the exhaust pipe on the one I built, the condensate ate lots of holes right through it on the first firing, changed it out to galvanized steel vent pipe,  no problems since. Yours looks like it might be the aluminised Mylar, and if the Mylar is on the inside it might not be a problem.

 Josh



#7 neilestrick

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 01:33 PM

I used  aluminum dryer duct for for the exhaust pipe on the one I built, the condensate ate lots of holes right through it on the first firing, changed it out to galvanized steel vent pipe,  no problems since. Yours looks like it might be the aluminised Mylar, and if the Mylar is on the inside it might not be a problem.

 Josh

 

Yes, those super flexible ducts like that don't generally last long at all. I can usually get two years out of the semi-rigid aluminum ducts. Currently I'm testing out a thermoplastic rubber duct that's rated to 275F and is supposed to have great chemical resistance. I'll run it for a year and see how it holds up. It's pretty much crush proof, so it would be great for schools where they take a lot of abuse. At less than $5 per foot, it could be a very economical replacement for metal ducting.


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#8 MichaelP

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 04:35 PM

Interesting point. I'll report back if/when the duct develops any problem.

 

They sell the same flexible duct with all the commercial units, don't they?



#9 neilestrick

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 04:48 PM

Interesting point. I'll report back if/when the duct develops any problem.

 

They sell the same flexible duct with all the commercial units, don't they?

 

The duct that comes with the commercial units is the semi-rigid type, much harder and less fabric-like than what you've got there.


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#10 MichaelP

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:29 PM

OK, thanks Neil.



#11 MudBug

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 03:58 PM

Excellent.

 

I am about install a kiln (ConeArt BX2322 ) in my storage shed in the backyard. It is a rather small shed. I have been thinking about some sort of venting system. I am, however, neither handy like you, nor do I have the equipment to make this.


So, any suggestions on store-bought or other possibilities for a vent system you all could suggest?


Not new to art and design. A complete newbie to Ceramics. Now, in a period of adaptating to the new medium.


#12 MichaelP

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:30 PM

Check Orton Vent Master, Skutt Enviro-Vent or L@L Vent Sure.

 

But do you really need a vent? Are you going to fire your kiln in a closed shed? If so, you may consider venting the shed instead.

 

Yes, kiln vent also evens the temperature in the kiln better, but millions of potters got and get by without one. :)



#13 neilestrick

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:51 PM

Check Orton Vent Master, Skutt Enviro-Vent or L@L Vent Sure.

 

But do you really need a vent? Are you going to fire your kiln in a closed shed? If so, you may consider venting the shed instead.

 

Yes, kiln vent also evens the temperature in the kiln better, but millions of potters got and get by without one. :)

 

Great idea. I would put a ceiling or wall vent in the shed itself, to pull out heat as well as fumes. If the shed floor is wood, put down two layers of cement board. Any wood/combustible walls closer than 16" also need cement board. It will get wicked hot in there, so vent the shed.


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#14 Nancy S.

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 08:54 PM

 

Yes, those super flexible ducts like that don't generally last long at all. I can usually get two years out of the semi-rigid aluminum ducts. Currently I'm testing out a thermoplastic rubber duct that's rated to 275F and is supposed to have great chemical resistance. I'll run it for a year and see how it holds up. It's pretty much crush proof, so it would be great for schools where they take a lot of abuse. At less than $5 per foot, it could be a very economical replacement for metal ducting.

 

 

Definitely keep us posted about the rubber ducting. I'm interested to see how that works out.

 

Now I just have to get the "Rubber Duckie" song out of my head ("Rubber ducting, you're the one / makes kiln venting lots of fun / rubber ducting, I'm awfully fond of yoooooouuu.....").

 

MichaelP, where did you get your fan - and how big is your kiln?



#15 MichaelP

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 03:15 AM

Nancy,

 

I bought the 4" inline Vortex fan (175 CFM) on eBay. You can often find a good deal and buy them for 1/2 price (IIRC, mine was about $65).

 

My kiln is Skutt KM-1018 (4.6 cu.ft),  its chamber is 23 3/8" in dia. x 18" high.

 

Mike



#16 MudBug

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 09:46 AM

It is a pretty small shed. So, I am guessing I will just vent the shed as a whole. I was planning on cement boards (or some sort of heat resisting layers...) for the wood floor. Any particular brand, thickness works better than others?


Not new to art and design. A complete newbie to Ceramics. Now, in a period of adaptating to the new medium.


#17 neilestrick

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 09:53 AM

Nancy,

 

I bought the 4" inline Vortex fan (175 CFM) on eBay. You can often find a good deal and buy them for 1/2 price (IIRC, mine was about $65).

 

My kiln is Skutt KM-1018 (4.6 cu.ft),  its chamber is 23 3/8" in dia. x 18" high.

 

Mike

 

The fans used on the L&L and Skutt vents are about 135 CFM, and can vent up to 20 cubic feet of kiln space, so Michael has more than enough power there. Having the adjustable room air intake is important there.


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#18 MichaelP

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 12:25 PM

It is a pretty small shed. So, I am guessing I will just vent the shed as a whole. I was planning on cement boards (or some sort of heat resisting layers...) for the wood floor. Any particular brand, thickness works better than others?

Is the shed made of sheet metal? If not, what materials are used for the walls and ceiling, and how far your kiln will be from those surfaces?

 

If the shed is small, the air there will become very hot during firing, so you need to provide a good ventilation. Something like open doors with or without exhaust fan, etc. Just make sure that there is a way for fresh cool air to freely enter the space if your exhaust fan sucks hot air out of it.

 

I must say that if your kiln rests on a kiln stand, and there is a good air movement, igniting wood floor will be next to impossible, in my personal opinion.  If you don't have a stand, you can use a couple of concrete blocks.

 

However, to be safe and follow official guidelines, you must rest your kiln on a fire-safe surface. Building a large and thick concrete slab in your shed would be a bit ridiculous, so you can use a sheet or two of HardieBacker, HardieBacker covered with aluminum foil or galvanized metal to reflect heat or something similar ( http://www.homedepot...0023/100170507# ) Any available thickness will work for fire protection, so base your choice on structural considerations/convenience. What worries me more is a chance to trip over the edge of the board, so think of it when planning how to lay it.

 

You can also make a pad using concrete blocks or bricks. But whatever you do, make sure that the kiln rests on a very stable foundation and there is absolutely no chance of rocking and tipping.

 

Again, I, personally, don't think the board or pad are necessary at all: the kiln will be well away from the floor, the heat rises, you will ventilate the space, so... But many (incl. your fire department and insurance company) will definitely disagree with me, and it's always better to be safe than sorry. Being anal retentive, I'd also use something non-combustible if I had a wood floor. This is despite the fact that I don't think it's really necessary. :)

 

Here is a couple of links I found for you: http://community.cer...a-wooden-floor/

 

http://www.skutt.com...chitect_web.pdf






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