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New Trend In Education?

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#21 Chantay

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 10:40 AM

Benzine,

 

I had to laugh,  the only class my daughter has an A in is art.  She has a very natural ability and likes to show off. 


- chantay

#22 oldlady

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 02:12 PM

this isn't going to change since the entire culture seems to be based on admiration and publicity for the least valuable of our citizens.  how many words have been written and minutes of tv been wasted on a group of women from one family whose only contribution to society seems to be that they have been written about and gotten their faces on magazines sold in the supermarkets?  making money, lots of it, by any means is the goal.

 

admiration for men who can throw, kick, hit with a stick or otherwise move an air filled leather sack and earn an unbelievable amount of money for a few years of their "careers" seems to be the norm.  science and invention are way down the list, teaching isn't even on the page.

 

nobody seems to care to do things correctly, ethics seem to be unheard of and common good is just a couple of words nobody understands anymore.

 

my rant for today.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#23 JBaymore

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 03:14 PM

Good rant.  Wise woman.

 

best,

 

................john


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#24 TJR

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 10:18 PM

 

  My youngest, 7th grade, is now on house arrest.  she wants to be cool and fit in. Apparently that means failing at least one core class.  I'm probably going to end up homeschooling her.

 

I see this all the time, with my co-worker's students.  He teaches Middle School Art, in my room, during my prep. 

 

There are quite a few students, who put in minimal effort, because "It's just an 'Art Class'!"  On top of that, they don't want to put in too much effort, and be called a "Try Hard".  Every time I hear that, I grill and mock the student, until they give me a good reason that a student shouldn't try on a school project?

 

I'm a bit shocked that a person in 7th grade can be on house arrest.I am actually enjoying my teaching year at school. I have had good and bad. Because it is an optional course, I have had students removed. This is what administrators are for.Just say that this person is disrupting the class and ruining it for the other students. Call parents. Send a letter home. Then drop them.

TJR.



#25 Babs

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 04:59 AM

Well if schools and educational institutions are there to transmit social values, what values are we transmitting?

The huge global norm is the worship of the almighty dollar. Companies take industry and manufacturing offshore so they make the $$s and so we can buy cheaply whilst our youth, our future, try to dream the dream... what dream is left for them? Umemployment forever?? Work ethics?? Whaat work? Keep them at school longer so that they do not appear on the national statistics of unemployed, many of them unemployable.

For students struggling with literacy many of the senior schoool subjects are language rich so....

If as educators we can at least, allow the youth of today to go forth with a little repect for others, self respect and discipline, what a word, can we achieve more? We are asked more and more to replace parenting doesn't leave much time does it?

National curriculums, and literacy and numeracy tests.. for whom? So more boxes can be ticked??  Easier to distribute funding, yes to the successful?As teachers do we not know that of our students without a national test?

Yes Benzine, I admire your passion and caring.If only the system will allow you to teach. A young teacher I know left teaching as he was asked to change a students grade to a pass as he hadn't warned the parents that their child would fail!!! He had contacted them continuously re the child's absences and assignments not completed!

Teachers of children as young as grade 3 are teaching to tests and giving practice tests of national literacy and numeracy tests....

National curriculum and core curriculums are being rolled out in Australia now. Because in the state I am in we have recently had to "get across" State Statements and Profiles,  then the State Curriculum Framework content ,only after a few years heck we'll now throw in the National Curriculum Framework, many teachers were a little jaded and  many local programmes with meaningful content have been thrown out or diminished, eg. Marine Environment Studies!

Crazy

A series on British TV "Educating Exeter" is a really great programme to view if you can get onto it.. Tough Discipline, tough but committed teachers, successful students!

Difficult issues.



#26 Pres

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 11:24 AM


 This is what administrators are for.Just say that this person is disrupting the class and ruining it for the other students. Call parents. Send a letter home. Then drop them.

TJR.

 

A little more difficult than that in my district. We had a three step plan before it would reach the admin. I rarely had problems to a write up degree. I usually followed a few simple steps. First problem, corrected student and documented. Next problem, called parents and documented. Third problem assigned after school detention and documented. After these, I wrote up and contacted admin. They would have no problem, telling students. . . Mr. Rice rarely sends anyone to us, you must be causing real problems so we will not be allowing you in his class the rest of semester. I think in 36 yrs I had that happen with maybe 15 students. More the first few, but then as I improved the need got to be less and less frequent.

 

National curriculums as I stated before are a need. We have a lot of folks that for one reason or another move around, without some form of organization to the National curriculum they will miss out on parts of subjects. Been there done that, and it is painful.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#27 Wyndham

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 04:14 PM

Just to show how a fade travels, my nephew in 10 grade just got sucker punched my a gang in school just because they wanted to.

This is just like the sucker punches that have killed others around the country.

One student was arrested and his brother later threaten my nephew "that they'd get him later".

This in a school in the middle of NC away from larger cities and city  issues.

How do you teach much less learn in a hostile environment like this. It's a war out there.

Wyndham



#28 Pres

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 07:58 PM

This trend is something I just became aware of-terrible!

 

When I was teaching, I had an incident in the mid years where a couple of students were on the last stages of my policy, and I happened to hear them talking about messing with my car. . . I wrote it up. I didn't hear any action for about a week. Next thing I know they have been suspended with "terroristic threats" as cause. The admin had gotten confermation from other students in the class all without me knowing.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#29 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 10:05 AM

I guess it isn't so new, but teaching to the test answers it more limited than facts.

Marcia

#30 Wyndham

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 10:40 AM

Doesn't it come down to the purpose of education? Are we educating for factory workers, drones to serve industry.? Are we educating for political power, generational party rule? Are we under educating for a consumer driven economy to allow pseudo prosperity, a ponzi   scheme that dangles the carrot of a house car and Ipad?

 

If we were to educate in a more pure non directed approach, one of true learning, would society tolerate such freedom.

 

Even as free as we are, we are still manipulated by the power we cede to others, thinking we have control in our vote, only to find we've installed the lie we voted against.

 

The pot that I make sits on the wheel, it does not lie or control. It is simply the expression of me in clay. It may not please others and it may be misshapen and imperfect but it is the sum of me in clay. So it's easier to deal with clay than the rest of the world.

Wyndham



#31 Bob Coyle

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 10:58 AM

 

“In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir; nothing but Facts!”

 

Sounds a lot like Sargent Friday in Dragnet :)



#32 Davidpotter

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:12 PM

As a senior in high school I may have the freshest perspective of what goes on in a school and the art room and what most students think and act. I see many students bullying others for literally ANYTHING in front of teachers but the teachers do not care or take notice. Most people in my ceramics classes do the class work but there are the few that sit in the back corner all semester and throw clay, are constantly using vulgar language and when they actually do touch clay they make pinch pots filled with water to throw into the pig mill. Sometimes they are forced to go on the wheel and end up dumping their entire slop/water bucket into the pug mill... with their tools.... then me and the teacher are there for at least an hour after school trying to just get tools out and pulling out all the clay to dry enough to actually hold a shape. These students do not care about anything except having fun and being as cool as possible. They have decided that they want an easy credit and do not care much for the rest of their education. Ironically i saw the "batch" of these kids from 3 years ago on the local news, arrested for vandalize, and all i thought was "Justice has been served" (they often bullied me while i was a freshman)

Some people think that they can just sit back and tell other people why they are better than them and expect for everything to be handed to them on a silver platter with their name on it.

 

Unfortunately we just have to deal with them it seems (i would prefer if teachers were aloud to just give these kids a smack)


Practice, practice, practice. Then when you think you've practiced enough, the real practice begins.

#33 stephsteph

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:38 PM

i taught after school art to middle schoolers last year. the focus in the school is heavily geared toward getting students to pass the standardized tests. i mean the teachers really ,really  focus on that. they have to get the numbers up, period.the kids seem to get a pretty good science class exposure as well.  there is no art during the day. no music either. most of the kids i encountered had little to no drawing ability and most had never worked with clay or most art materials.

i believe the school is disserving kinetic learners, those who learn by doing, by using their hands and materials to problem solve and create. in truth i would love to see what use to be called ' 'vocational' aspect to high school curriculum..i'd love to see these kids not only learn about art but learn about, say tile making , welding,etc. another local school still has welding, which encompases 'farm' welding as well as a sculptural project.

 

but the middle school kids are at the mercy of a state that has cut everything.. the progtam i taught at  was a federal grant program and it ended last year. in that program ,some kids got  tutoring  in math and reading in accordance with prep for the tests, but it was the only opportunity thety had to take  so called 'enrichment' clases , such as art


Stephani Stephenson

Revival Arts Studio

http://www.revivaltileworks.com

 


#34 Pres

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 11:44 AM

Alas, much of what you see in the way of hands on industry, whether welding, plumbing, wiring, wood working of other is now relegated to the vo-tech extensions of the schools. Shops have moved out of HS, some still exist in JHS. All in all, the future homeowners will have to survive on their local tradesmen, as they will not even know how to drive a dry wall screw! Our preoccupation with the test came about big time with NCLB, and has only gotten worse. This has pushed so much of the electives to the back of the bus, that we don't get off of the bus! So much of government change has not been good for electives, future of manufacturing, or the arts in general.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#35 JBaymore

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 12:18 PM

Another aspect in this educational focus discussion is that, in the USA at least, we don't tend to make much physical stuff anymore. This lack of potential jobs in the segments of the employment world that helped to meet the needs of those that were more inclined to be makers of things (factory jobs, etc.) are not out there anymore. Also much of what we have in our lives is no longer designed to be repairable. It is use it and throw it away when it breaks. So jobs that involve repair of most physical stuff other than cars are gone. So hence part of the move away from things like shop classes and more vocational "making" aspoects.

 

The move in US employment roles is toward the "service", "business operations", "information" and "technology" fields. Unfortunately not everyone is cut out for these kinds of jobs whether that is temperment or core type of intellegences (I'm not talking about "smart" there.... but how one's mind tends to work). This is a REAL issue in the employment picture for the US. We've let a whole "support for the welfare of the people" aspect of our culture get cut out of day-to-day life and be moved elsewhere.

 

US businesse are crying for creative people in their operations to drive new ways of making money and gaining competitive edge. But the whole "teach to the test" approach now in place is focused to the antithesis of creativity. The ARTS foster this kind of creativity.... whether this is in an art major.... or in an MBA who has had good experience in art training. But what do we cut out to "save" money? Arts.

 

The solutions to this go way beyond the educational field, but extrapolates out to the whole culture of the country. What do we value?

 

best,

 

...................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#36 Pres

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 09:17 AM

Used to be that the service sector was entry level usually filled by HS kids, and some adults. Then you went into industry, or some upper level position, some in service becoming managers. Many times back in the 60's the managers of plants and factories had come up through the ranks, with little formal education. This upward movement created out middle class. Now we have a labor market based as John says more on the service sector, manufacturing shipped out, and the upward movement has been stymied.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#37 Babs

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:54 PM

What do we value? I would have to "write you a long letter as I haven't enough time to write a short one". Reading the national constitution may be a start. Any visionaries out there still thinking of this??

What do we see as the future of our nation if we educate using constricted prescriptive curricula?

How about educating for autonomous people who can set their own purlieus? 

People who can ask the right questions and are efficient at finding the answers to these questions.

Teach research mehodolgies from day one. Most 2-3 yeaar olds will drive the normal human off the edge with the 'Why" word, but then we do something to them and they cease to ask questions. Give a research topic to a class and more thatn 1/2 will want to jump onto google straight away. Do they know what they want to find??

Hey! Set their own research question

 "Gas kiln or electric??" 

I have to go and think....

What is it I want to know,

what was the question?



#38 Benzine

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 07:13 PM

As a senior in high school I may have the freshest perspective of what goes on in a school and the art room and what most students think and act. I see many students bullying others for literally ANYTHING in front of teachers but the teachers do not care or take notice. Most people in my ceramics classes do the class work but there are the few that sit in the back corner all semester and throw clay, are constantly using vulgar language and when they actually do touch clay they make pinch pots filled with water to throw into the pig mill. Sometimes they are forced to go on the wheel and end up dumping their entire slop/water bucket into the pug mill... with their tools.... then me and the teacher are there for at least an hour after school trying to just get tools out and pulling out all the clay to dry enough to actually hold a shape. These students do not care about anything except having fun and being as cool as possible. They have decided that they want an easy credit and do not care much for the rest of their education. Ironically i saw the "batch" of these kids from 3 years ago on the local news, arrested for vandalize, and all i thought was "Justice has been served" (they often bullied me while i was a freshman)

Some people think that they can just sit back and tell other people why they are better than them and expect for everything to be handed to them on a silver platter with their name on it.

 

Unfortunately we just have to deal with them it seems (i would prefer if teachers were aloud to just give these kids a smack)

David,

 

I appreciate your viewpoint as a student, and it's one that sometime gets skimmed over, when education is discussed.

 

In regards to your experience, I am sorry that you had issues with bullying.  It's sadly something that I don't think we'll ever be able to completely get rid of in schools.  This is because schools are a microcasm of society, and society is full of bullies.  I will say this though, sometimes when it seems like the teacher is acting like they don't see anything, or know what is going on, it's because they don't.  Managing twenty some individuals, especially in a hands on class, isn't as easy as most of us make it look.....  Despite the fact teachers like to pretend, we are omnipotent, that just isn't the case.  W keep an eye and an ear out for problems, as we make our way around the room.  There will be times we don't see something, and rely on the students coming to us.  I realize it is difficult for students to speak up, for fear of being ostracized, but the faculty does depend on it, to deal with problems more effectively.

 

I've had my share of idiots in class.  It's the same group of students, who wonder why they don't have the same privileges as everyone else.  In fact, it's because of such students that I assign sets of tools to students, instead of just having a couple dozen of each tool that everyone shares.  It took one section of a class, and a half dozen or so broken needle tools and fettling knives, to make me realize I need to give each student responsibility over a set.  Since then, the only broken tools I've had, were those that broke from everyday wear and tear. 

 

I will agree that there are definitely students, who just expect to get a good grade, for doing the bare minimum.  It's part of my job to make them reassess that belief. 

 

 

but the middle school kids are at the mercy of a state that has cut everything.. the progtam i taught at  was a federal grant program and it ended last year. in that program ,some kids got  tutoring  in math and reading in accordance with prep for the tests, but it was the only opportunity thety had to take  so called 'enrichment' clases , such as art

 

My colleague, who teaches Middle School/ Elementary Art, has a very limited budget.  He tries to order basic materials like paint and paper, and they act like it's a big deal.  I tell him, that if there is a big issue with it, then I have no problem having a word with them, about how is preparing them for their high school classes.  Hard to be consistent with our expectations if he doesn't have the materials to get them started.

 

Alas, much of what you see in the way of hands on industry, whether welding, plumbing, wiring, wood working of other is now relegated to the vo-tech extensions of the schools. Shops have moved out of HS, some still exist in JHS. All in all, the future homeowners will have to survive on their local tradesmen, as they will not even know how to drive a dry wall screw! Our preoccupation with the test came about big time with NCLB, and has only gotten worse. This has pushed so much of the electives to the back of the bus, that we don't get off of the bus! So much of government change has not been good for electives, future of manufacturing, or the arts in general.

Pres, I've seen you mention the lack of Industrial Tech multiple times before.  Apparently Pennsylvania is a little worse off, than here.  Every school I've taught at, has had had a pretty good Industrial Tech program.   My first district actually had a great program.  Woods, Metals, Autos.  The metals teacher did an amazing job.  He worked with the community to get equipment, like a computer controlled plasma cutter, and ran some of his upper level classes like a business.  The students were responsible for keeping track of expenses, and we expected to call him, not the school if they were going to be gone, like they were reporting in to a job.  I have little doubt, the students came out of his classes knowing their stuff.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#39 TJR

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 01:00 PM

Going to have to weigh in AGAIN! Last day of my two week Christmas holiday. Back to the high school art teaching job Monday.

I have the lazy kids at the back of the room. You spend time with them to show that the sky is full of multiple layers of colour. They paint it a solid blue like a fence. This is watercolour-has to be tranluscent. There is a silhouet of a black tree in the fore-ground. Left it out.Mark-55%.

You get the kid in 40s-specialized art. I find out he is also taking 20g art  with the other art teacher at the same time. Then I find out he has a credit for 30g art which was taught last semester. How can you put a student in grade 12 art at the same time as he is taking gr10 art, and with an existing credit for gr 11. Obviously he has been placed here because he is not good at anything else. 58 absences later, he is finally dropped from the course.

I do have the class with the two hoons that want all the attention and are disruptive-swearing, eating, dipping out to have a smoke. Admin do not want to know about them. We will be starting our clay unit on Monday. They will be the one's throwing clay. They won't be withdrawn. There is nowhere for them to go.

Just don't be afraid to fail students. Just make sure you have documented evidence that they have done nothing.

I also have some really talented gr.12's. The class where you go;"Holy Crap that's good!"Thing balance out luckily. I still like getting up in the morning to teach school.

TJR.



#40 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:40 PM

I think the main problem with society is that each generation has wanted their offspring to have a better life. This idea seems to have been lost along the way and changed to an easy life. Parents now give their children everything they want exactly when they want it.

 

This leaves schools in a tough situation. Young people just expect everything to happen as it should so never try to work. I know this is a little cliche but it is the parents. You have to make life hard to get people to thrive. We are wired in a world that is/was based on survival of the fittest.

 

I have had a very easy life but luckily somewhere along the way my dad became a role model for me and it is probably the best thing that happened. He showed me that life is never easy and you have to work very hard to achieve anything. He showed me this without even knowing. They still like to try to make my life easy, and I happily accept it even though I know it is not the best decision to make me a stronger person.

 

People are lazy, but once forced into a situation they can succeed. If allowed to float along most people will. 


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