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How To Warm Cink Water

studio cold weather water

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#1 Barley Hollow

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 11:50 AM

Has anyone found a good solution for warming the water in a Cink? Over the winter, my studio gets cold, and the water in the Cink gets painfully cold. I don't need it to be hot or even warm, just not really cold. I have to believe someone's already worked this out. Any suggestions? 



#2 Stephen

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 12:02 PM

It does suck doesn't it.

 

Have you thought about leaving a small space heater with a thermostat right next to the holding bucket so that it keeps it from getting too terribly cold? Even though they will not put enough heat out to do much to the rest of the room they will do a pretty good job of keeping a warming a pocket right around where they are sitting. The ones that look like the old radiator heaters use circulating oil and I think are pretty safe to run unattended and they don't need anything special in the way of power.



#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 12:10 PM

I used a submersion heater (for coffee cups) in some water and added it to throwing water. It took the chill off.

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#4 bciskepottery

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 02:21 PM

You could consider an aquarium heater . . . come to think of it, I might try that myself in my 5-gal buckets of water sitting in the garage studio.  Or keep a hot pot water pot handy and heat up a cup or two and add it at the beginning of your session. 



#5 annekat

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 02:33 PM

I just walk back and forth to and from the house with hot water from the kitchen sink. And empty the clear part off the top of the bucket into the garden, or the whole thing into the recycle bucket. What a pain! Seriously considering moving my wheel and some shelves and things into the house for the winter. I'd get a lot more done. Would have the wood stove and save on the propane to heat the studio. I live in an old cabin with a rough wood floor and funky interior walls, so no big deal. Just need to clean up diligently. I have an upstairs for living space and to get away from the clay. Here I'm complaining and I live in a much less cold place than many! But cold is cold, no matter how cold. The fingers can't work correctly when cold.


Anne

#6 Mark C.

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:21 PM

I just put an all aluminum pan (no plastic anywhere) on my gas heater full of water-when hot I take whatever water I need to pour wherever I need it.

This works well in winter when the heater is on. The aquarium heater will work fine as well-be careful with it and plastic buckets as it can melt them if on high I think. Its been 40 years since I had 10 fish tanks so I'm fuzzing on how hot they got.

Mark


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#7 Brian Reed

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 11:41 AM

Yes the solution is simple.  Plumb hot water to your sink from a hot water heater... 

 

Just kidding

 

However they have those small 5 gallon hot water heaters that are made for small cabins and such. 

 

Once I rented a cabin and they had this small insta-hot water thing under the sink that was electric and when you turned on the hot water knob it kicked on and hot water came out.  Just a very small version of the large tankless water heaters.


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#8 Stephen

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 01:59 PM

I think the original poster is talking about a product called the cink, I have one as well and it is a closed recirculating system that filters out the clay. We have a septic system and decided to buy one instead of plumbing so we could be sure that clay does not end up in the septic system. Works very pretty well but the water get really, really cold in an unheated space overnight.

#9 Diane Puckett

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:19 PM

Maybe this place has something that would work http://www.oemheater...um-heaters.aspx .

If you search online for heated water buckets, there are a lot made for farm use, but I doubt they get warm enough.
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#10 annekat

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:37 PM

I think the original poster is talking about a product called the cink, I have one as well and it is a closed recirculating system that filters out the clay. We have a septic system and decided to buy one instead of plumbing so we could be sure that clay does not end up in the septic system. Works very pretty well but the water get really, really cold in an unheated space overnight.

Thanks for the clarification. I thought it was a misspelling that everyone was too polite to point out. Now I'll have to research this Cink thing, as I do have septic system and don't want any clay in there. Also the small on demand water heaters are something I'd like to check out.


Anne

#11 annekat

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:42 PM

Here it is, for those who are unfamiliar with it: http://www.dogwoodce...ct/the-cink.htm

 

Pretty cool. Not something I can possibly afford, but at least the replacement filters are pretty cheap.


Anne

#12 oldlady

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:00 AM

sorry, i do not know about the cink but have you folks who are on a septic system looked at the Gleco trap to put under you regular sink?  you can make the same kind of thing with simple PVC pipe and a bucket and adjust it to your drain size and height.


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#13 oldlady

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:32 AM

i looked at the cink ad.  can't see spending all that money on something i could build with a used kitchen sink, some flexible drain line and an outdoor fishpond pump in a bucket.  heating it with a stock tank heater would work if you just put that heater in the bottom and create a false bottom just above it with a metal rack.  that is so you do not accidentally break it with something you might drop into the sink. cleaning it out would just be a matter of directing the flexible drain line into a separate bucket for disposal.  when you go away just unplug the heater and drain the sink.  start each session with a hot bucketful from the house if it is not too far and plug in the heater again.


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#14 Stephen

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 01:24 PM

It was a little pricey and I'm sure your alternative suggestion, oldlady (it sure feels disrespectful using your username ;-) is a good one. I will say that the $1500 was offset somewhat by what it would have cost to put in an actual stainless steel work sink in the garage and it has been flawless for over 6 years now. I am currently building a separate 300 foot building to separate out green ware production from glazing and firing and it is really nice to be able to simply move the Cink over to its new home and plug it in. That space will be heated 24/7 so the super cold water the OP mentioned will not be an issue.

 

Another thing I see about a Cink to any apartment/condo potters is that it would work really well in turning a spare bedroom into a studio with running water if that room is lacking a bath. 







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