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Spectrum Metallic Gold Rain

commercial glaze glaze Spectrum Metallic gold rain

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#1 KarenE

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:34 PM

Has anyone tested Spectrum's new Metallic Gold Rain?  I would like to try it on a sculpture but need to pay shipping to test.  I assume it doesn't actually look like the promotional test tile- but I'm looking for something stunning!!

 

Thanks!!



#2 Pam S

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 12:14 AM

I tried it on a test tile. Applied as recommended. It came out a dull brick color. My guess is the application was too thin. I'll try again in the next glaze fire.

"Saving just one dog won't change the world, but it surely will change the world for that one dog."


#3 KarenE

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 12:17 PM

Thank you for responding.  I went ahead and ordered it but it's out of stock for the next week or two.  I would love to see any results you get.  I want to fire to cone 4.



#4 bciancio

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 07:47 AM

I fired to cone 5 and it came out grey. Has anyone had any success?



#5 clay lover

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:26 AM

I got a sort of metallic black, nothing near gold, at ^5 hot.  disappointing.



#6 PEASTON

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:45 AM

I applied this glaze  to a mid fire white clay body (Little Loafers) according to the directions. The result was a dull gray/black drab  at  cone 5. Very disappointed. I called Spectrum and they advised that I  put  up to 6 or 7 heavy coats on. I tried this a second time on a test bowl and fired to  cone 6  and got the same result as before. This is just a real crappy glaze in my opinion.



#7 Norm Stuart

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 01:48 PM

Metallic Rain, which I have not tried, is similar in chemistry to Spectrum Metallic Mirror and Amaco Palladium.

 

Amaco says their leaded Palladium is not dinnerware safe, but Spectrum says leaded Metallic Mirror is food-safe based on the glassy non-leeching finish of the glaze  "Contains some heavy metals and/or cadmium compounds but passes test for lead and cadmium release.".

 

You need a small amount of lead to create this type of look.  But they don't use enough lead to make these glazes reliable.

 

 

I think you'd be far happier with a standard ^05 lead-manganese glaze like these sold by Clay Planet - very reliable, but not food safe.

 

http://shop.clay-pla...aztec-gold.aspx

 

Has anyone tested Spectrum's new Metallic Gold Rain?  I would like to try it on a sculpture but need to pay shipping to test.  I assume it doesn't actually look like the promotional test tile- but I'm looking for something stunning!!

 

Thanks!!



#8 Moz

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 02:22 PM

I have what I call a "Bronze" glaze, not quite the bright gold but it has it's own cachet. See the pot to my left in photo. Basic recipe is:-

Spodumene 38

Feldspar      58

Clay               4

Red Iron         3.5

That gives a gloss gold in reduction at C10 using K Spar and a satin using Neph Sy. Add 2 Co and 1 Cr to give the charcoal you also see on the pot in the photo. Tends to pinhole but a little more Si fixes that, unfortunately it also glosses the matt version.



#9 Babs

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 08:38 PM

I thought the golds would be out of it pretty low on teh firing scale, afterwhich you get the colors written above.



#10 Norm Stuart

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:22 PM

It could be that too much lead has evaporated from these ^6 glazes if you fire too slowly.

 

I found a ceramics journal from 1904 which quantifies the percentage of the lead in a glaze, fired in a sagger, which vaporized per hour.

 

Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry, Volume 23  - Society of Chemical Industry (Great Britain)  1904

http://books.google....er hour&f=false

 

Without rereading it I think the volatilization of lead per hour at cone 6 was about 1/3 per hour.  At higher cones it's quickly gone.

 

These commercial glazes are partially lead fluxed manganese glazes which form a green, blue or red glass, with a reflective layer of gold or silver on the surface.  The key to success with these glazes seems to be having a very smooth bisque surface and a thick application that often runs.  The Amaco Palladium has a tendency to pinhole on many clays which I've only seen in fluorine containing frits like Ferro 5301 and 3269. 

 

I prefer the reliability of the ^05 gold glaze, which becomes especially gold when placed over a previously fired ^6 glaze to provide a smooth surface and protection against clay off-gassing.

 

I thought the golds would be out of it pretty low on the firing scale, after which you get the colors written above.







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