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Re-Glazing A Broken Piece--Possible?


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#1 Puzzlebox Art Studio

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 07:13 AM

I broke the handle off a mug that needed re-glazing anyway. (there didn't seem to be any structural issues with the handle previously, I actually dropped something heavy onto the handle).

 

It was an underglaze painted mug with clear glaze that left a few bare spots so I wanted to re-coat with clear and fire again...so that would be the 4th firing including bisque (don't know if that makes a difference).

 

Can I just glue the handle back on, glaze and fire? Or does the glaze seep through the cracks and force the broken bits off again? This is mid-fire, and not a runny glaze.

 

If it's not a problem to do that, does type of glue matter? Super glue, or is just white latex glue OK? (that's what I already have available, so it's easiest!).

 

Thanks!



#2 Biglou13

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 07:28 AM

Neither of those glues will survive the temperature demands of the kiln.

Best to just gust glue and use as is.
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#3 Claypple

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 09:15 AM

You can re-glaze the pieces separately and THEN glue it.



#4 OffCenter

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 09:17 AM

I would use duct tape.


E pur si muove.

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#5 Claypple

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 05:43 PM

I would use duct tape.

 

That is why you will never be a Moderator! You just killed the whole thread!

Imagine people are waisting their time trying to help Puzzlebox with his scientific project,

giving one stupid advice after another, but YOU JUST NAILED IT! What a bummer!

Now you will never get a cash in the envelope or a new car as a newly appointed Moderator.  



#6 Min

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 06:28 PM

 

I would use duct tape.

 

That is why you will never be a Moderator! You just killed the whole thread!

Imagine people are waisting their time trying to help Puzzlebox with his scientific project,

giving one stupid advice after another, but you just nailed it! What a bummer!

Now you will never get a cash in the envelope or a new car as a newly appointed Moderator.  

 

 

 

 thanks for the smile!

 

(toss the mug and make another one)



#7 Mossyrock

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 07:43 PM

Personally, I wouldn't trust a mug full of hot coffee to an after-fired glued-on handle and gluing the handle on and then reglazing and refiring would probably end up with the handle falling off and attaching itself to the kiln shelf.....I agree with others.....just create another one (and maybe use the first one as a pencil or brush holder?)  :)


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#8 erinwells

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 05:19 PM

All of the points brought up at very valid and for a mug I would not go through the hassle but, it is very possible to glaze some works back together as long as gravity is on your side.

 

Imagine glaze as powdered glass, when fired, the glass melts and forms a solid sheet. This said, you can use glaze to re-attach pieces that stack vertically because for a little while in the kiln the glass is a semi-liquid layer that will melt and stick pieces back together. I have made entire works that were held together just by glaze in that respect. If you happen to have access to keraset (a dry setting mortar that can be fired) you can use that to attach pieces before re-firing and it will hold things together within reason if you are not firing above cone 6. 

 

Just so you can trouble shoot in the future!! 



#9 Biglou13

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 05:45 PM

i was thinking it will make a good pencil/pen holder


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The beige is blinding!!!!!!
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The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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#10 Benzine

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 08:41 PM

If you really like the form, grind down/ smooth out the broken pieces of the handle, on the main body, reglaze, and now it's a cup.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#11 Puzzlebox Art Studio

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 04:21 AM

Thanks, everyone. The problem is it's a painted cup with a pretty intricate design and there's only one. Even worse, the artist who actually owned the pottery wheel left the studio and took it with him after I finished a few mugs, so we can only make hand-built mugs from now on and I'm still working out the most time-efficient design. Well, the truly worst thing is that the breakage is from total stupidity, as I literally dropped something onto the handle.

 

The person who was going to buy it is affiliated with the studio so he's pretty understanding about it (as long as there's a discount), but it's a bummer. I was kind of imagining that the glue would hold just long enough for the glaze to get liquid (although as mentioned in my first post, I don't think this glaze is particularly runny) and then seal it after the glue burns off. So great if that could actually happen!



#12 oldlady

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 10:05 AM

all of you in the USA may not remember that this poster is in southeast asia, (thailand?) and does not have access to all of the things we think of as ordinary.  the group is small and they are trying to make a living by creating small, easily sold pendants and other simple items in clay.  their focus is on the delicate painting of each object to make it one of a kind.  they apparently now have no widely experienced potter to help with the questions that come up.  our advice is all they have.

 

Puzzlebox, i am sorry that i did not send you the metal cookie cutters that i promised.  i did not write your address down and will now get it from your website and send the cutters.  i will send simple shapes like the diamond and circle and square you cut out now.  since they are for wearing i will keep them small.  if you wish to change the shape just use a tool to bend the metal.

 

any of you potters with extra tools (or dollars)  could do the same.  the address is  The Puzzlebox Art Studio.........35 Intharakiri Road.........Mae Sot, Tak 63110..................Thailand


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#13 oldlady

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 01:21 PM

Bciske and anyone else who knows how to attach a link please send puzzlebox the info so he can watch sandi periantozzi's demo on making handbuilt mugs.  i know there are demos by other people but please keep it simple since the studio at puzzlebox does not have much to work with.  thanks


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#14 Pres

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 04:55 PM

I sent a link to all of her videos on CAD.

 

http://ceramicartsda...i&sa.x=0&sa.y=0


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#15 Mark C.

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 01:13 AM

Any waterproff epoxy will fix this break.

Mark 


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#16 LovesPurple

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:07 AM

I am not an expert, and my solution is certainly not elegant, but I needed some quad switchplates and I glued two doubles together by adding some white glue to some clear glaze and taping them together with painters tape (blue masking tape).  The glue and tape both burned off very nicely, but they held long enough for the glaze to connect the two pieces.  The switchplates, now that they are installed, do not have any stress on them and are still in one piece. But I don't know if it would work for a mug handle.



#17 Puzzlebox Art Studio

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 09:22 PM

oldlady, thanks for the offer but it's really not necessary! We make our own molds for the pendant shapes. I really appreciate your kind thoughts, though.

 

We actually had a big flood in the last few days, haven't viewed the handbuilt videos yet but thanks for sending, Pres. I do already know sort of how to make handbuilt mugs, but am struggling to make them look less childlike while not using double or triple the time it takes to make them on the wheel. Labor time of course figures into our final prices.

 

One more quick question about the re-glazing...do pieces generally shrink AGAIN if they are re-fired? I was planning not to re-glaze the broken handle pieces as it's the inside of the mug that matters more (a few spots left bare by glaze). But I worry that the handle pieces won't match up to the body anymore if the mug body shrinks.






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