Jump to content


Photo

Do you have a favorite clay body? | June 12, 2012


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 Deidre Haignere

Deidre Haignere

    Member

  • Administrators
  • 17 posts

Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:33 AM

Do you have a favorite clay body? Stoneware (light or dark), porcelain, terra cotta? Do you work with more than one clay body? Why did you choose the particular clay you use?

I work with two bodies, one that I make and one that I buy. I use stoneware for most of my work, but every now and then I want porcelain for its wonderful qualities (despite its difficulties); I buy it.


Diana Pancioli
Potters Council Board Member
dianamp@comcast.net
dianapancioli.com

#2 SShirley

SShirley

    Cow Creek Pottery

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 199 posts
  • LocationPittsburg, Kansas

Posted 13 June 2012 - 08:18 AM

I use a cone 6 porcelain from Flint Hills. It's smooth as butter, really soft (just the way I like it) and I can use it straight from the bag without wedging. I get a thousand pounds at a time and he even delivers it.

#3 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,156 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 17 June 2012 - 12:56 AM

I like the terra cotta called Galestra that I use in Tuscany. It is gray wet but fires red. It actually softens the skin when working with it.
It fires to cone 08 and must be soaked with water after firing.
It is a great hand building body and can also be thrown. I believe it comes from Montelupo, outside of Florence.
At home in the US. I make my own terra cotta, raku, and stoneware. I buy porcelain. I like the porcelain I got from Alligator clay in Baton Rouge for ^6

Marcia

#4 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,069 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:20 AM

My clay bodies (I use well more than one) are a combination of commercial bodies, altered commercial bodies, and my own blends. I have a batch mixer that I had built for me by a grad student at Mass College of Art (where I worked YEARS ago....like mid 70s) that is like the old Bluebird mixers. Still working.

Since it seems these days that about 90% of people doing claywork use commercial bodies..... I'll constrain my answers to that aspect.

I use Sheffield Pottery Supply as my main supplier. They are in western Massachusetts ...and I am in southern New Hampshire. They have provided great product and service over the years.

From them, I utilize a couple of bodies.

One is their version of the so-called "Z" clay. But I rarely use it unaltered. Usually it has granite dust (from fines up to 1/4" chunks) added to it, as well as often some sand from the river that surrounds my property and occasionally some local red clay.

One of my FAVORITE clay bodies is their "Sheffield #42". This is one that I DO often use unaltered. It contains Lizella, is very dark iron-bearing, and is the closest thing (with one runner-up......see below) I have found in commercial clays available here in America to some iof the clays I use when I am working in Japan. This too often gets granite dust and sand.....but nev er local red clay. It is said to be oxidation only and recommended for cone 8. I fire it in the noborigama up to cone 11 and in reduction for smaller items. It is beautiful. Works well with charcoal youhen (ala' Bizen process).

The other "sort-of-like-Japanese-clay" clay body I use a little of is "Grogzilla" (LOVE the name!) available from Clay Planet on the west coast. No one on the east coast stocks it.... so the shipping costs me more than the clay when I order it. It is a bit similar to some of the Shigaraki/Iga clay. This too often gets the granite dust and sand added....and gets really "nasty" (in a nice way....... wabi-sabi stuff).

My work is a blend of about 50% thrown and 50% handbuilt. About 99.9999999% noborigama woodfired.....but some overglaze enamels in an electric kiln are added.

best,

.......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#5 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,069 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 25 June 2012 - 02:31 PM

WOW.... 4500 views................ and only about four postings!!!!!



Come on folks......... there clearly is an interest in this topic. Share your thoughts....don't just look.



best,


........................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#6 Matt Oz

Matt Oz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 280 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 28 June 2012 - 06:07 PM

Cone 6 translucent porcelain, because I like messing with light.



#7 joe.darling

joe.darling

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • LocationSydney, Australia

Posted 26 August 2012 - 08:58 PM

Here in Sydney Australia, I most enjoy Keane's "Number 1" earthenware. It's an earthy dark brown medium grog clay with something special. I like it because of the elasticity, body... Spirit maybe within this clay. Throwing this clay is like working in a collabrotive project. The clay boldly moves and sometimes get ahead of me shaping itself before I shape it. It is a pleasure to work with. Try it if you ever come to Sydney!

#8 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,335 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 27 August 2012 - 10:10 AM

I use Southern Ice Porcelain because I am totally addicted to it. My work is all colored porcelain and the colors just POP while the white stays incredibly translucent.
For teaching workshops, I use more forgiving friendly Cone 6 porcelains or white clays ... whatever the local supplier has or Highwater Clay's P5 or Little Loafers.

Attached Files


  • Wil likes this

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#9 DeLosMares

DeLosMares

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:25 AM

I have been using Black Mountain from laguna clay for a while now, it has great elasticity, a little slippy on the wheel(but i throw with slip so it works well), and its a really beautiful rich, earthy, dark brown clay. I like it a lot except for how difficult it is to glaze because of how much iron is in the body. I was wondering if anyone knows of a clay that has great elasticity for throwing, and is just as earthy but not as dark as the Black Mountain.

#10 Edith Marie

Edith Marie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 42 posts
  • LocationHelena Montana

Posted 27 September 2012 - 06:49 AM

Good Morning everyone,

Haven’t found one clay body I like better than another, so if I had to pick it would be purge. Purge can be light or dark body depending on what has been made and available when I wonder into the Archie Bray Clay Biz where I purchase all my ceramic supplies. Going on a trip, even a golfing trip, with Google at my fingertips I look for Pottery & Supplies for a new adventure into the world of pottery in another state.

Edie




#11 Cass

Cass

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 175 posts
  • LocationMontana

Posted 27 September 2012 - 07:27 AM

laguna WSO stoneware...for me, the ultimate raku body

#12 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 716 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 27 September 2012 - 09:06 AM

Only Laguna clay has been sold in this area I have always used it, but the ceramic supply store has started carrying a new line Flinthill Clay. I haven't been able to find very much about it but I'm going to give it a try. Denice

#13 voceramics

voceramics

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 34 posts
  • LocationPaducah, KY

Posted 27 September 2012 - 03:55 PM

Laguna's Hawaiin Red is my all time favorite clay. Just fabulous for hand building and glazes look absolutely amazing on it, deeper and richer. And it loves to keep its form without warping. Since moving eastward we don't have access to that clay, but I still miss it.
Phuong
Vo Studio Ceramics
www.vostudioceramics.etsy.com

#14 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,319 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 27 September 2012 - 10:15 PM

I was just at the ceramic supply store yesterday. I picked up 5 boxes of Danish White which is from Laguna. It is a white porcelaineous stoneware. Sometimes I get it with sand if I am making bakers.I also use Plainsman products. They have an open pit clay mine in Medicine Hat Alberta. I use their porcelain P580.
For my high school art classes I use M340 which is a white mid range body that fires to Cone 6. I buy 20 boxes at a time. This amount usually lasts a semester.
Tom[TJR]

#15 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,148 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 28 September 2012 - 09:53 PM

Laguna's Dave's porcelain for me for reduction work.
For baking dishes I like half and half from Laguna the smoother one as there are two.
I like various stonewares for salt work-

Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#16 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,156 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:30 PM

I am liking Limoges Porcelain while I am working in Vallauris, France. It throws beautifully.
Marcia

#17 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 30 September 2012 - 08:31 AM

I am liking Limoges Porcelain while I am working in Vallauris, France. It throws beautifully.
Marcia


Must be great to work with a famous French porcelain. How translucent is it? I hope you post pics.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#18 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 30 September 2012 - 08:35 AM

I like Lizella Red.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#19 Brian Reed

Brian Reed

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • LocationWashington State

Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:00 AM

being here in Seattle I have two cone 10 clay bodies that I like to use from Seattle Pottery Supply. One is Kenzan Porcelain and the other is a heavy grog stoneware called Bruning. Both are prepared clays that I buy in bags. They also recycle together nicely with a little Lincoln fire clay added.

I did recently buy some Dakota White Stoneware from Clay Art Center in Tacoma that I am going to try soon.
Brian Reed

Throwing down in Washington State

http://www.reedpottery.com

Northwest Clay Club

#20 Idaho Potter

Idaho Potter

    Learning all the time

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 400 posts
  • LocationBoise, Idaho

Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:18 PM

As most of my work is Raku, my favorite is Coleman Raku from Clay Art Center. White body fires well under extreme circumstances--loss rate is usually very low, less than 10%.

Shirley




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users