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kitasclay

Best Way to Move Glazes to a New Studio?

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Fellow potters, I need your expertise:

I'm part of a potter's guild and we're in the process of moving everything to a new space - our kilns, our chemicals, our tools, and our already-mixed glazes. Most of it is pretty easy (in theory) but I am hoping some of you might have some insight on moving glaze buckets - or at least making them a little lighter and hopefully easier to move.

Does anyone have any tips or tricks to getting the water out of a glaze, relatively quickly, without compromising the integrity of the mixture? Just pouring out the top layer of water seems like it might also take out any material that is lighter than the rest and stays suspended in the water.

Is there a filtering device for this purpose?

Hopefully we'll be moving or donating most of the glazes, but some will probably be disposed of - if anyone has any insight on best practices that would be much appreciated also.

Any/all other tips for doing a big studio move (on a tight budget) would be more than welcome!

 

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How many days or weeks do you have before the move? If you have a week or so, remove the lids from the buckets now. The winter air will evaporate the excess water in a few days. 

If you have glazes that don’t contain any soluble components, you can quickly remove the top water with a turkey baster, while disturbing the settled solids as little as possible. For glazes that contain solubles, tipping or turkey-bastering the excess water could change the makeup of the glaze, so evaporation is better for those. 

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You can pour off the top clear water-use a dipper /container-you could measure the amount and add that amount at new location.

In terms of disposals -drain off the water and let the rest to dry out -you could put this in a few cardboard boxes to dry  or freeze it outside -toss it as a solid.This is for non toxic glazes .

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Not only will you lose fine particles in suspension you will lose any soluble components by pouring water off.

I've known a few buckets of glaze that were never the same after someone poured water off.

Allowing water to evaporate is the best way I know to remove water.

Freezing buckets of glaze can keep the mess down but will also change some glazes.

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I think freezing the glazes would be the best way to prepare them for moving. That shouldn't be too difficult in your neck of the woods. Then test them after they thaw to see if there are any changes. It might be advisable to put the glazes into smaller buckets before freezing so that in the event that the buckets crack, you won't lose too much.

JohnnyK

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kitasclay,  i wonder if we are all reading your post and thinking of 5 gallon buckets of glaze.  you probably would not be asking about moving such a small bucket so i wonder if your large group uses trash can size glaze buckets.  i have seen them used in group situations and unless they are in Rubbermaid Brute brand containers with wheels, you are right, it will be difficult to move them.  

if they are in large containers, i would make plywood bases for each one, add wheels from harbor freight, 5 wheels minimum, and try that.   heavy, containers of wet materials  mean difficult handling.   it might help to surround each one with some kind of band.  the 5 or 6 inch wide plastic wrapping that so many shipping companies use might make a difference if wound around enough times.  i would do that about a foot down from the top just to stabilize the entire thing.  if the container is not full, put the band at the level of the liquid inside.

Edited by oldlady
correct spelling

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