Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Insulating storage


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Madmingei

Madmingei

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 04 January 2012 - 09:11 AM

Hi there, I am about to make some new storage shelves for my student's work and wondering if anyone knows some good insulating material that prevents the work drying out too quickly? The students are usually only at class once per week and I would love to avoid the whole wrapping with plastic thing! It would be great if they could make, leave in storage and return in a week to find the work perfectly leather-hard for trimming! Is that a pipe dream or can anyone suggest something wacky?
Thanks in anticipation!

#2 teardrop

teardrop

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 211 posts
  • LocationColorado

Posted 04 January 2012 - 09:20 AM

There's another thread goin with talk on the same topic...

Thoughts:

wrap the entire shelf in plastic

use "Oven bags" to cover the work. They DO NOT breathe.

Someone else mentioned placing a wet towel inside the drying area

a small misting humidifier in the space will also help.

good luck

teardrop
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. Dr. Seuss US author & illustrator (1904 - 1991)

#3 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,116 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 04 January 2012 - 09:40 AM

Hi there, I am about to make some new storage shelves for my student's work and wondering if anyone knows some good insulating material that prevents the work drying out too quickly? The students are usually only at class once per week and I would love to avoid the whole wrapping with plastic thing! It would be great if they could make, leave in storage and return in a week to find the work perfectly leather-hard for trimming! Is that a pipe dream or can anyone suggest something wacky?
Thanks in anticipation!


I used to require HS students to bring in boxes and bags to store work in. These worked well for years, and then I noticed a lot of kids started bringing in large plastic containers. these they would use upside down with a board on the lid. Press the seal, carry to a shelf and store. next day still damp and workable. When I started doing adult classes I set aside a storage area for them, as they were only there once a week. Taught them about the kids storage technique, and their pots would usually be firm enough(leather hard) for trimming by the next Saturday class. I did also have a wet cabinet that I stored larger or more delicate pieces in. Here at home I have an old fridge that I use for a wet cabinet-works great.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#4 trina

trina

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 437 posts

Posted 04 January 2012 - 09:43 AM

Hi there,


Don't know what your space is like but old fridges work well, albeit they are god ugly and take up space. Otherwise I know you want to get away from the plastic bag thing but I find that that very thin plastic that dry cleaners use is great. Trina

#5 SShirley

SShirley

    Cow Creek Pottery

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 199 posts
  • LocationPittsburg, Kansas

Posted 04 January 2012 - 11:32 AM

Hi there, I am about to make some new storage shelves for my student's work and wondering if anyone knows some good insulating material that prevents the work drying out too quickly? The students are usually only at class once per week and I would love to avoid the whole wrapping with plastic thing! It would be great if they could make, leave in storage and return in a week to find the work perfectly leather-hard for trimming! Is that a pipe dream or can anyone suggest something wacky?
Thanks in anticipation!


I don't know if you have space for one for every student, or if their work would fit, but I have a big Sterlite container (mine is transparent) that I put a couple of inches of plaster in the bottom. Wet the plaster and put the pieces in the box and put the lid on and it stays workable for months.

#6 atanzey

atanzey

    -

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 147 posts
  • LocationSouth-Central Pennsylvania

Posted 04 January 2012 - 12:55 PM

This is easy and looks interesting. You could add trays of gravel that you dampen, to make it last even longer.



#7 Darla

Darla

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36 posts

Posted 04 January 2012 - 06:57 PM

Ice cream buckets.... perfect for small pieces....

#8 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,325 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 05 January 2012 - 11:03 AM

I really like the plastic container idea ... It serves the purpose of keeping the work damp while also defining the amount of space they use. Work they want to dry could be placed on a board atop this container. Another benefit is that it puts the responsibility for keeping the work properly stored on them, rather than on a shelving system you created.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#9 melbrandle

melbrandle

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • LocationGolden Grove

Posted 03 November 2014 - 03:52 AM

Really interesting storage ideas here! I think damp towels might work the best, or even a humidifier? You might need to create a little "room" rather than just a shelf if you're thinking of using that idea though. But generally as long as you have a bit of moisture going around the area of where your pots are in storage, I should think that things will be able to hold out for a week.



#10 ChenowethArts

ChenowethArts

    Senior Geek & Whimsical Artist

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 248 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee - Where at least a few studios make something besides music.

Posted 03 November 2014 - 06:43 AM

On smaller pieces, I like the plastic ice cream bucket idea.  If I know the pieces are going to be there for several days, I will put a small damp sponge in the bucket at the same time.  For larger pieces, I made plastic flaps that seal off one shelf of what is normally my drying area...with those, I do check regularly and will do a quick misting if I feel that it is needed.

 

-Paul


Paul Chenoweth
Visit/Like me on Facebook
Connect on Twitter
Mostly Ceramics on Pinterest

#11 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,138 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 03 November 2014 - 07:32 AM

A plastic bucket over each piece. I use larger stage containers for 6-8 pieces depending on sizes. The sit on formica tables in my shop until I get back to them in a day or more.

Individual quart to 5 gallon buckets then the storage containers. You'd need a lot of space but pieces do stay damp.

A closet with a humidifier might also work. I had a large 8 x 10 closet with lots of shelves when I was teaching. Had plaster vats on the sides of the wall wetted down plus a humidifier. 

 

Marcia



#12 PSC

PSC

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 144 posts
  • LocationFlorida

Posted 03 November 2014 - 10:13 PM

An old fridge or those 4 day coolers. I noticed that walmart had some plastic bins made by glad or ziplock that had a rubber gasket to make them water leak resistant, they might work.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users