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#1 smokin pots

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 03:53 PM

Anyone have any great or simple potting tips to share? I'll share a few that make my life easier....
I use a can of "Dust Remover" moisture-free cleaning, (for computers cameras) to blow dust out of
my pots before glazing. Its has a long thin tube where the air comes out like wd 40 thats gets in crevices.
I know I could just blow, but that gets in my face.
To cover glaze buckets and throwing buckets to keep dust, glaze, and mosquitos out (i work in a barn) I use
a ziplock type product. It looks like a Shower cap and comes in all sizes. Quick and easy! After glazing I put the bucket
lid back on over this. I keep a separate small bucket for each of my glazing stirring spoons labeled and filled with water to stir
my glazes, that way no cross contamination and they are alway clean. I just shake the water off them, and put a little
shower cap thingy over the bucket when done. I use an old refrigerator with the shelves removed to store my clay in so
it stays a nice temp. unplugged
My new favorite I got last week off the boards here is to insert a sheet of paper over or under a pot that is being dried
with the dry cleaner bag to help suck up some of the condensation that starts to form making the drying process go smother.


I Know I learn something new here every day!
la paloma texas pottery

#2 Big Electric Cat

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 04:33 PM

Here is a related thread :

http://ceramicartsda...e-use-of-tools/
"Free yourself - that leash is long,long,long!"
-YeahYeahYeahs

#3 ~janie

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 11:55 AM

I clip a fishing bobber to my chamois, so it floats in my pail of water. No losing that chamois.

A small piece of plastic, held taunt, will work as well as a chamois for smoothing the rim of a pot.

Cover your clay slab with plastic (like that which comes from the dry cleaner), then cut it with your cookie cutter. It eliminates the need to dress the edges, and leaves them perfect and smooth.

Cover your work with small, (1 gallon or so) buckets to keep it from drying out. This is especially good for handbuilding work in progress.

I use sewing stabilizer, Pellon, to roll slabs on instead of canvas. Pellon doesn't leave a texture like canvas does.

Liquid plastic is great for making texture tools. I put it in little bottles and trail it on wood or plastic. It is also great as a resist, but I am careful to remove it before firing. It makes stinky fumes in the kiln.

Trim tape from the Auto body/paint store is great as a resist! It comes in widths of 1/8", 1/4", 1/2" and 3/4", and it stretches and will take a curve and hold it. Sticks very well on bisque or greenware.

#4 Big Electric Cat

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 12:07 AM

I'm going to have to try that autobody painting tape, sounds like just what I need.
You can also use hot glue to make texture or stamp designs on small pieces of wood, plastic, etc.
Which reminds me, I have used little pieces of molding from the lumber section of the store as sprig molds, for some interesting additions. You can dry them to leather hard with a heat gun, and enjoy the smell of singed wood!
"Free yourself - that leash is long,long,long!"
-YeahYeahYeahs

#5 Guest_alabamapotter_*

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 07:23 PM

I clip a fishing bobber to my chamois, so it floats in my pail of water. No losing that chamois.

Hey,
I like the idea of keeping up with the chamois... I used to be a fireman in a major city and we used
chamois to dry the trucks. When they got to the point the chamois couldn't be used any longer, we threw
them away. When I started taking pottery, I went back to the station and asked for any chamois
targeted for the trash and one friend started saving them for me. One ragged chamois makes several
strips for potters. After most of the chamois wound up in the clay mixer, I only got myself chamois.
I have taken apart leather shoes for making strips to smooth the rims. The best part I ever have found so far was a Nike leather check emblem on the side. Just hang the short side inside and smooth the rim.
Thanks,
Alabama Potter

#6 ~janie

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 10:56 PM

I love leather too, for smoothing the rims. I cut the back and palms of leather gloves into strips. They last (almost) forever.

#7 Pres

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 09:58 AM

I love leather too, for smoothing the rims. I cut the back and palms of leather gloves into strips. They last (almost) forever.


Old worn leather wallets work well too. Use kneedsfoot oil on them to soften.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 Dinah

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 08:14 PM

I saw a good idea a while ago on clayart list and went along to my nearest and cheapest box store to buy a dozen+ long handled brushes -- toilet bowl brushes so that each glaze bucket has its own stirrer. I don't know exactlywhat I was thinking about for years when I would stir and rinse one poor over-used brush. I have rationalized this into I was thinking about "what next" in glaze-time. Sometimes, I left glaze brushes in the buckets but the old style ones rusted out or the brush disintegrated, or the wooden handle mildewed. Eugh! Not good. :angry: Forest for the trees department. Today I just bought an adjustable cheese cutter for less than $3. Perhaps it's going to be a case of one gets what one pays for, but with some judicious and careful tightening it should be great for faceting. Love the way those faceted edges break! Don't you?:D Also I use the webbing between my pointer and middle finger on either hand as a rim smoother. I have to be careful using a chamois so I don't squeeze it and create indentation inside and outside where none is needed. Of course, if this is part of one's repertoire then say no more.
Dinah
www.DinahSnipesSteveni.com

#9 Potterstu

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 10:44 PM

I get credit cards in the mail (unsolicited). I cut them into varrious shapes and use them as ribs.

#10 Guest_friedfiredfireclay_*

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 11:01 PM

When I lost one of my Rudy Project lenses, I pressed the other one into serive as a rib, does a great job when the clay is leather hard, and you need to shape/scrape.

I make a cheapo spray booth by bending a wire coat hanger into a circle, then hang dry cleaning plastic from it; when I am done spraying, I just use a spray bottle to wash the glaze into the bucket.

#11 lakesidepottery

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 09:56 AM

Hi and welcom to the pottery world.

See collection of pottery tips, tricks, lessons and tutorials (including videos) in the link below.

http://lakesidepotte...Pages/Tips.html

This collection includes:

HOW TO: Wheel Throwing Tips and Tricks

HOW TO: Hand Building Projects


HOW TO: Improve Your Studio

FIRING: How to, Solve Problems

GLAZING: Recipes, How to, Solve Problems

CHILDREN / KIDS PROJECTS

POTTERY VIDEOS

HOW TO: Repair Broken Ceramic and Pottery


Kindly, Patty and Morty
Lakeside Pottery, Ceramic School & Studio
543 Newfield Avenue
Stamford, CT 06905
203-323-2222
www.lakesidepottery.com

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#12 TypicalGirl

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 11:26 AM

Anyone have any great or simple potting tips to share?


Love the bobber idea!
I use Pelon instead of canvas also.

Lets see...
  • Cut an 8 inch (ish) piece off of a pool noodle and slit it open lengthwise.Then slide it over the edge of your work table or the table of your wheel. Great for keeping your sharps (needle tool, fetling knife, etc) at hand. Attached File  IMAG0339.jpg   277.37KB   38 downloads
  • I use silicone spatulas for throwing/smoothing ribs. They come in a variety of shapes and stiffnesses and the ones I found at Ace Hardware can be used ether on the plastic handle as a throwing stick or to smooth and compress the insides of tall pieces, or removed from the handle as a rib.
  • I use shellack instead of waz as a resist. It dries quickly, can be removed easily with denatured alcohol, is easy to see on a piece and goes on precisely.

Cathi Newlin, Angels Camp, Ca
box49@caltel.com
http://www.CNewlin.com

#13 Benhim

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 12:43 AM

I clip a fishing bobber to my chamois, so it floats in my pail of water. No losing that chamois.

Hey,
I like the idea of keeping up with the chamois... I used to be a fireman in a major city and we used
chamois to dry the trucks. When they got to the point the chamois couldn't be used any longer, we threw
them away. When I started taking pottery, I went back to the station and asked for any chamois
targeted for the trash and one friend started saving them for me. One ragged chamois makes several
strips for potters. After most of the chamois wound up in the clay mixer, I only got myself chamois.
I have taken apart leather shoes for making strips to smooth the rims. The best part I ever have found so far was a Nike leather check emblem on the side. Just hang the short side inside and smooth the rim.
Thanks,
Alabama Potter


That's a good idea. I stopped using chamois because I kept digging them out of recycled clay. They were pretty much banned in one of the colleges I attended because they would break get stuck in the pug mill.

BenCo Ceramics


#14 buckeye

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 12:00 PM

What a great thread! so many great ideas.

I

#15 rissierae

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 04:58 PM

Corn starch for lidded jars. You can get them to fit tighter this way, without getting the lid stuck to the jar.;)

#16 rissierae

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 05:02 PM

I saw a good idea a while ago on clayart list and went along to my nearest and cheapest box store to buy a dozen+ long handled brushes -- toilet bowl brushes so that each glaze bucket has its own stirrer. I don't know exactlywhat I was thinking about for years when I would stir and rinse one poor over-used brush. I have rationalized this into I was thinking about "what next" in glaze-time. Sometimes, I left glaze brushes in the buckets but the old style ones rusted out or the brush disintegrated, or the wooden handle mildewed. Eugh! Not good. :angry: Forest for the trees department. Today I just bought an adjustable cheese cutter for less than $3. Perhaps it's going to be a case of one gets what one pays for, but with some judicious and careful tightening it should be great for faceting. Love the way those faceted edges break! Don't you?:D Also I use the webbing between my pointer and middle finger on either hand as a rim smoother. I have to be careful using a chamois so I don't squeeze it and create indentation inside and outside where none is needed. Of course, if this is part of one's repertoire then say no more.


In school we used a drill with a mixer attachment thingy to stir the glazes. We just put it in a bucket of water to rinse and keep from contaminating others.:)

#17 Pres

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 10:04 AM


Anyone have any great or simple potting tips to share?


Love the bobber idea!
I use Pelon instead of canvas also.

Lets see...
  • Cut an 8 inch (ish) piece off of a pool noodle and slit it open lengthwise.Then slide it over the edge of your work table or the table of your wheel. Great for keeping your sharps (needle tool, fetling knife, etc) at hand. Attached File  IMAG0339.jpg   277.37KB   38 downloads
  • I use silicone spatulas for throwing/smoothing ribs. They come in a variety of shapes and stiffnesses and the ones I found at Ace Hardware can be used ether on the plastic handle as a throwing stick or to smooth and compress the insides of tall pieces, or removed from the handle as a rib.
  • I use shellack instead of waz as a resist. It dries quickly, can be removed easily with denatured alcohol, is easy to see on a piece and goes on precisely.

I use 4 inches of pipe insulation attached to my bucket to keep my needle tool and fettling knives safe. When worn the replacement is easy to find, and one section lasts a long time.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#18 claclana

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 07:57 PM

This is great help! thanks All!!
cleaning the extruder is a pain, so I was adviced to put the ceramic in a bag, or oil in the internal walls, I didn't like the plastic coming trhough the extrusion when I recharged it, and the oil was fast gone, I try news paper wraping clay, was ok, but touching the clay with lint did it, just a soft powder around the rod... and when mixed the lint and clay works as sort of "fiberclay".

#19 Alden

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 02:51 AM

Great sharing!!one of my friend tell me aboutthis thread and i see is really good..excellent tips...this is a very useful thread that will be referenced long intothe future.....Nice sharing...keep it up....



#20 lacemuse

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 02:09 PM

In the wood section at Hobby Lobby, I found wooden decorative pieces that you glue onto other wood items. They have the hand-carved look. I used one to make the center design on a tile mold.

Recently, I went through my jewelry & made sprig molds & stamps - a little cameo, a hand-cast medieval design bronze pin that looks great on the outside of mugs, jars, etc.

Little needle tools made by inserting various diameters of wire into brightly colored fimo clay handles. Include a hole, so they can be hung.

I've repurposed lots of fimo clay tools for ceramic tools - modeling tools, a little wavy cutter, stamps &, recently, a little square cookie type cutter that I stamp with the medieval stamp, put a hole in one corner, then use for glaze tests. If they come out ok, they make really nice pendants.

A tiny dog bone cookie cutter was a fun find that generated so many ideas I HAD to buy it. One of the many ideas was glaze testers.

Take out the insides of a Bic pen & use the outer plastic tube to make holes.

Lace & handwoven fabric to imprint with.

Repurposed art supplies - brushes mostly along with my sketchbook & charcoal pencils for pottery idea sketches.

Blank journals make really nice fully-bound firing logs & glaze recipe books. You can pay a lot for them, make them yourself, or use cheapy composition books that go on sale during the back to school sales.




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