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Benhim

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About Benhim

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday November 27

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  • Location
    Battle Ground Washington

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  1. I've always kept all the ports in and dropped shreds of paper into the kiln. As soon as the paper stops catching on fire I open the ports. Once I can handle the ware with out burning myself I'll open the door and unload it. I should add that I have a fairly high tolerance for pain.
  2. It's amazing how many companies don't respond. I've contacted about a dozen companies in the last three months that didn't respond. In each case I was prepared to purchase materials from them and said so in the email. No wonder our economy is down, no body is doing their job. Yes, it would... but in my experience they don't reply to questions emailed to them directly, so I wouldn't hold my breath that they will post here. I wouldn't treat my customers that way, but I guess that's pretty old-school these days.
  3. Awesome user name!

  4. Oh I forgot to mention that I also have started using witness cones to fire off my ware instead of relying on the kiln setter. I use the large Orton cones in cone packs that I make with clay and grog. The idea here is to allow myself some margin at the top to soak the kiln and then fire it back down slightly to allow the glaze to stop bubbling and heal over. This also allows me to shut down the kiln manually, allow it to cool and the turn it back on at 1900 or so and hold it for certain effects like the growth of crystals in iron red glazes.
  5. One thing that really helps my glaze application is wetting my bisque prior to application. I wet the pot in the process rinsing off all the particulate matter which will cause crawling or other glaze malfunction. I allow the pot to dry partially and then dip the pot in the bucket for a good long count depending on the thickness of the pot, maybe 3 for a thick pot, 8 for a thin pot. Consistency is a huge part of dipping glaze I like to have a heavy cream consistency. Something that hangs on my finger, but doesn't coat heavily. Having wet the pot prior to dipping allows the glaze to slide acros
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