Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ok, so I came into a bottle of what I think is a cone 018-019 mother of pearl lustre from a company called Med Mar Metals. It's from the 70's and the person I got it from can't remember all the details about how to use it. My "Google fu" only comes up with eBay listings of people selling off their deceased relative's ceramics stash, and some place that sells ore out of Anaheim.

So I'd like to know if anyone has any experience with this particular product?

If it goes bad at all?

Is mother of pearl as finicky as gold lustre in terms of contamination?

Best firing temp?

Does the surface I put it on need to be glazed, or is a mature cone 10 bare clay (think b-mix) doable?

Any other considerations?

 

Anything helps. Thanks!

Cal

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a quart bottle of same or similar product from back in the day.

I suggest from my memory of long ago using this -that the surface be a shiney fired glaze.These will work best.

I used to apply over fired cone 10 clear porcelain glaze.

It is not as touchy as gold and silver lusters.

You still need a clean dry surface without oils on it.

keep the dust off as you would with all lusters-use the same cleaners for brushes.fire to o18-019 as Marcia says above.

I have a few pieces with this on it from the 70's.

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys!

I've never used lustres before, and I only know what I cold find on the interwebs. What do you thin them with? Any special cleaning process for the wares before application? If I apply the lustre at home and transport the pieces to my local art centre, will wrapping them in newspaper be a problem?

 

It's for Christmas ornaments, so yeah, they might be a little over the top :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Do not thin them-clean brush with nasty luster cleaners-Bailey ceramics sells it if I recall.Use a new brush and always use that one afterwards.

I would use denatured alcohol to clean as it should leave nothing behind. I also would read up on this whole area 1st. There has been several threads on all this here before .

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 years later...

Oh wow, it’s been a minute since I asked this one!

In the name of updating everyone on what happened, I fired the mother of pearl to 017 and it worked great. I found I had to really mind my application thickness, because it will drip and run and make a yucky haze if you put too much on. I bought a couple of sable brushes that are dedicated for the use and cleaned them with olive oil. 
 

This one is definitely a pine oil base, and I had to use it outside because I don’t have Liam’s fancy fume hood.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...

Does anyone have any information on food safety with the rainbow opal luster? Can it be used on surfaces that come in contact with food and drink? I glazed the inside of some teacups, and another potter said heavy metal lusters are not food safe. Some new Duncan mother of pearl luster says it is food safe. Other brands say it isn't. Any help would be appreciated. I would rather be safe than sorry.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Potteryasthetic said:

Does anyone have any information on food safety with the rainbow opal luster? Can it be used on surfaces that come in contact with food and drink? I glazed the inside of some teacups, and another potter said heavy metal lusters are not food safe. Some new Duncan mother of pearl luster says it is food safe. Other brands say it isn't. Any help would be appreciated. I would rather be safe than sorry.

It depends on the composition.   Most modern lustre overglazes no longer use and lead as a flux, but it's possible.

If you know the brand you can look up the SDS, which will show you the metals they use.  Typically mother of pearl lustres use a titanium salt as the only metal, at least the ones I've seen like Duncan, and that would be food safe because once fired all that remains is the titanium film.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PeterH said:

@liambesaw Do you make all your lustres by the fusion/dry method, or do you make some by the wet/precipitation method?

So for standard resin lustres I use the dry method.  Resin, salts, heat.

For experimental lustres, like a silver lustre I've been working on, I've found the wet method to work best.  Carbonic acid, salts, precipitated as a soap in sodium hydroxide, and then dissolved in an appropriate solvent.  Depending on the carbonic acid used, usually isopropyl, toluene or turpentine.

I've found the soaped lustres to be more reliable at lower temperatures, so that's why they work well with silver.  Silver tends to burn off even before the resin in a resinate lustre.

Copper is my next battle, it doesn't seem to like becoming specular no matter what and it really bothers me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/10/2014 at 3:26 AM, Callie Beller Diesel said:

... Any other considerations?

Johanna DeMaine's comments on Working with Resinate Lustres are interesting, and emphasise H&S
http://overglaze.demaine.org/
http://overglaze.demaine.org/wp-content/uploads/Working-with-resinate-lustres3.pdf

Edited by PeterH
finger trouble
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.