Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have a question that I hope someone will be able to answer. As a newbie in the world of "ceramic molds" I came across some cartoon characters ceramic molds such as Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, and Pinnochio to name a few.  Although I'm not ready to learn how to use them yet, what is the best way to store them.  I should mentioned that the molds I have have two pieces.  I have read conflicting information that the molds should be stored upright with the pouring hold faced down to laying the ceramic mold flat (on the flat side of the mold) with the seam line (I'm assuming this is where each side of the mold meets) should be parallel and not stored this way. 

 

Thank you in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that you should store moulds "face to face".  That is with the pouring holes facing each other.  Something to do with the salts leaching outwards not inwards.  Also helps to keep the creatures and dust out.  At this time of year my studio has a coating of Silver Birch seeds.  In the spring it's spiders and pollen.  If they're stored on solid shelves in a single layer, they could be face down.

 

Whichever way up they are, they need to be banded together, not left in separate parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the responses.  Regarding the Disney molds, they will be for personal use only and not for sale to the public. To further clarify, the molds are already banded I just don't know if they should be stored upright or stored flat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see pictures of the moulds if you didn't mind, not for replication of course, but for interest. It's not every day that you get to see someone get good quality DISNEY moulds to keep in storage!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also have a mold storage question :)

 

Can i storage plaster molds that i rarely use outside in a shed? Im located in northern EU, so 4 seasons and temps between -4f to 85f.

Well, acutually i have used old molds that were kept years  in a moist basement, i dried them, and saw no difference in setting times.

But still... :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mouse likes to protect its copyright but if they are the orgional licenced molds, there is not much they can do.

The Disney molds are but a few of the most valuable molds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

speaking of molds I have a bunch under my house that I'm recycling(small truck full)

They are getting ground up with cement and other road fill at a recycle plant down the road.

These mold are from my collage days and are of unsual forms like donuts and dog poo and bread loafs ( it was art).

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question.

I have recently come across a collection of anywhere from 2k-5k ceramic molds. From a home I purchased and am in the process of redoing. 

Some molds have been stored in a basement (dark and dank..but not dripping wet)..some were stored in a detached 2 car garage (no heat..but dry)..and several hundred were left outside in the elements.

My question is 3 parts.

1. Will the ones stored in the basement and garage still be viable for sale?

2. Can the ones outside be dried enough as not to be ruined?

3. What is my best option for selling?

90% are strapped..and the other 10% have been stacked flat..with the 2 pieces of each mold meeting to make a whole. Seamlines are visible on the sides. None seem to be warped.

Sorry for such a long post..but any help is appreciated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think they mostly will be all fine for use.

The biggest issue with molds is finding a buyer.

Depending on your location  in the country  will determine how easy the sale will be meaning in some areas molds are still used some.

Around here molds are free  as they are to hard to sell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you might open some of them to see their interior condition.  the ones outside will probably be very poor quality, nobody in business would put good molds outside to be destroyed by the weather.  they are heavy and were probably put outside just to get them out of working space.

look for crisp edges and details.   if not there, your molds are trash.   to see their quality, push a piece of soft clay into the most detailed area and look at the result.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As above, plus moulds have a life of 20-30 castings before they start to deteriorate.  (Put simply, one of the slip ingredients eats plaster.)  In commercial slip-casting they are replaced regularly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.