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JNF Fire Workings

Primitive style pottery..anyone?

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Hello eveyone!! 

   I'm new here to the forums, and I love making primitive style pottery, just getting started doing this, been a thing on my mind for a long time as I've always been fascinated with natural clay, so I've decided to refine my own..I do not own a kiln or a wheel so its all pinch pot and coil for me. Having a blast getting set up and started, I will post some pre fired pics up as I have not yet fired anything just yet. Last year I did a test fire a simple little ash try but I seemed to have misplaced it.. ..

 

       Take care everyone. ..Ill be happy to answer questions when I can..as I learn as I go!!  Here is a pic of one of my freshly finished mugs.  Ill post up more pics as I fire them..hopefully soon.

0522202019-1.jpg

Edited by JNF Fire Workings
Had to upload a pic..needed adjustment

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 Here are three other items I have dried completely, this is all, I have so far. I plan to get some more studio time in very early tomorrow morning and then Ill be pouring more natural clay onto my bats to dry, wedge and store for use. I will also be digging for more clay, I have only about 30 pounds now, but I will be digging 2 full 5 gallon buckets to refine. 

   I will report back with my fired pieces as soon as I can, I may experiment with a wood ash glaze as well.

0522202211-1.jpg

Edited by JNF Fire Workings
Typo fixes

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46 minutes ago, JNF Fire Workings said:

 Here are three other items I have dried completely, this is all, I have so far. I plan to get some more studio time in very early tomorrow morning and then Ill be pouring more natural clay onto my bats to dry, wedge and store for use. I will also be digging for more clay, I have only about 30 pounds now, but I will be digging 2 full 5 gallon buckets to refine. 

   I will report back with my fired pieces as soon as I can, I may experiment with a wood ash glaze as well.

0522202211-1.jpg

Keep in mind that wood ash glazes are typically higher melting than you would normally achieve in a pit fire.  I suggest a primitive kiln build if you're interested in that

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9 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Keep in mind that wood ash glazes are typically higher melting than you would normally achieve in a pit fire.  I suggest a primitive kiln build if you're interested in that

Yes, that is the plan, pit fires have too big of a risk for uneven heating and developing cracks and breakage. Last time I test fired the small ash tray and other small items I made a quick makeship barrel kiln. As far as what cone it fired to....I have no clue, howeverI also do metal casting and forging so I definitely can make some heat, of course I dont want to get too hot and melt the clay. Thank you for the reply!

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Try printing out a color/heat/cone chart that will allow you to approximate the temp inside the kiln by the heat color. Not accurate, but approximate, and with some cones in the firing you will be able to estimate when to stop stoking!

 

best,

Pres

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"Sorry Hulk,  but I like the one on white paper as it does not interfere with the color as much."

Not at all (I read the words - not looking at the colour swatches, having worked in a machine shop, a steel mill, and spent more hours welding than most … the progression of heat/colour is familiar enough.)! Good point - get a good chart and print it on good paper.

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I did a batch of pit firing one time, with all the wares being green.  Almost none of them survived, and those that did had a lot of spalling. 

Needless to say, the next time, I had everything bisqued first.

I have heard of people, some on this very forum, who do primitive firing, and used a standard oven to preheat the wares, before putting them in the actual fire.  So that's always a possibility. 

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8 hours ago, Benzine said:

I did a batch of pit firing one time, with all the wares being green.  Almost none of them survived, and those that did had a lot of spalling. 

Needless to say, the next time, I had everything bisqued first.

I have heard of people, some on this very forum, who do primitive firing, and used a standard oven to preheat the wares, before putting them in the actual fire.  So that's always a possibility. 

Yes some photos of pots stacked around kiln edge prior to firing also.

Search for member Alabama .He practised with local clays and primitive firings

Edited by Babs
To add Alabama info

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6 hours ago, JNF Fire Workings said:

Definitely have to pre heat the stuff when it comes to the primitive pottery, as well having more than one of the same items in case of breakage.  This is why I want to make a barrel kiln or something similar to more evenly heat and ramp up temp.

Check out Alabama His stuff and pics in his gallery.

And Marcia Selsor's top hat raku kilns ,also a member with great experience

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