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GEP

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  1. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Chilly in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Lots of new business owners are finding that the .COM domain names they want are not available, or that they are considered "premium" domain names and are too expensive for a small business owner. Many are opting to buy .CO domain names instead. (.CO is the country code for Colombia, but the suffix is being marketed to American audiences as a close approximation of .COM). 
    I don't think there's anything wrong with having a website with a .CO url. But there is a serious problem with using a .CO domain name as your email address. Don't do it! 
    These days, most website are visited with a hyperlink, so the visitor does not need to know the exact url. However, email addresses are often keyed in by the sender. Many people will reflexively type .COM instead of .CO.
    Recently, another small business registered a domain name that is the same as mine, but with the .CO suffix. I get a lot of emails that are meant for her. When it started, I contacted her and let her know it was happening. I forwarded her emails for a month or so. But she wasn't doing anything to solve the problem. In fact, sometimes it was clear that she signed up for a service or newsletter and typed in her own email address incorrectly. 
    Eventually, I told her that this problem was her responsibility, and I would no longer forward her emails. She once again refused to change anything. I sensed that she thought I was bothering her, or being “mean.” She has missed out on some rather important sounding emails since them. I am baffled by her response. If I knew this was happening to my business emails, I would consider it an emergency that needs immediate solving.
    If you want to buy a .CO domain, that's fine for your website, but not your email! Stick to a gmail address instead, or anything else that does not invite confusion. 
  2. Like
    GEP reacted to Min in What’s on your workbench?   
    Some of 75 assorted mini vases for wedding favours, 60 done, 15 more to do.

     
  3. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Benzine in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Lots of new business owners are finding that the .COM domain names they want are not available, or that they are considered "premium" domain names and are too expensive for a small business owner. Many are opting to buy .CO domain names instead. (.CO is the country code for Colombia, but the suffix is being marketed to American audiences as a close approximation of .COM). 
    I don't think there's anything wrong with having a website with a .CO url. But there is a serious problem with using a .CO domain name as your email address. Don't do it! 
    These days, most website are visited with a hyperlink, so the visitor does not need to know the exact url. However, email addresses are often keyed in by the sender. Many people will reflexively type .COM instead of .CO.
    Recently, another small business registered a domain name that is the same as mine, but with the .CO suffix. I get a lot of emails that are meant for her. When it started, I contacted her and let her know it was happening. I forwarded her emails for a month or so. But she wasn't doing anything to solve the problem. In fact, sometimes it was clear that she signed up for a service or newsletter and typed in her own email address incorrectly. 
    Eventually, I told her that this problem was her responsibility, and I would no longer forward her emails. She once again refused to change anything. I sensed that she thought I was bothering her, or being “mean.” She has missed out on some rather important sounding emails since them. I am baffled by her response. If I knew this was happening to my business emails, I would consider it an emergency that needs immediate solving.
    If you want to buy a .CO domain, that's fine for your website, but not your email! Stick to a gmail address instead, or anything else that does not invite confusion. 
  4. Like
    GEP got a reaction from liambesaw in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Oh ok, I see what you mean. But that’s not what “premium” domains are. And once I paid the asking price for learnpottery com (to an unknown third party, though I’m sure GoDaddy kept a small percentage as commission), now I only have to pay $15/year to keep it (to GoDaddy), just like the other domains I own. 
  5. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Lots of new business owners are finding that the .COM domain names they want are not available, or that they are considered "premium" domain names and are too expensive for a small business owner. Many are opting to buy .CO domain names instead. (.CO is the country code for Colombia, but the suffix is being marketed to American audiences as a close approximation of .COM). 
    I don't think there's anything wrong with having a website with a .CO url. But there is a serious problem with using a .CO domain name as your email address. Don't do it! 
    These days, most website are visited with a hyperlink, so the visitor does not need to know the exact url. However, email addresses are often keyed in by the sender. Many people will reflexively type .COM instead of .CO.
    Recently, another small business registered a domain name that is the same as mine, but with the .CO suffix. I get a lot of emails that are meant for her. When it started, I contacted her and let her know it was happening. I forwarded her emails for a month or so. But she wasn't doing anything to solve the problem. In fact, sometimes it was clear that she signed up for a service or newsletter and typed in her own email address incorrectly. 
    Eventually, I told her that this problem was her responsibility, and I would no longer forward her emails. She once again refused to change anything. I sensed that she thought I was bothering her, or being “mean.” She has missed out on some rather important sounding emails since them. I am baffled by her response. If I knew this was happening to my business emails, I would consider it an emergency that needs immediate solving.
    If you want to buy a .CO domain, that's fine for your website, but not your email! Stick to a gmail address instead, or anything else that does not invite confusion. 
  6. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Pres in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Lots of new business owners are finding that the .COM domain names they want are not available, or that they are considered "premium" domain names and are too expensive for a small business owner. Many are opting to buy .CO domain names instead. (.CO is the country code for Colombia, but the suffix is being marketed to American audiences as a close approximation of .COM). 
    I don't think there's anything wrong with having a website with a .CO url. But there is a serious problem with using a .CO domain name as your email address. Don't do it! 
    These days, most website are visited with a hyperlink, so the visitor does not need to know the exact url. However, email addresses are often keyed in by the sender. Many people will reflexively type .COM instead of .CO.
    Recently, another small business registered a domain name that is the same as mine, but with the .CO suffix. I get a lot of emails that are meant for her. When it started, I contacted her and let her know it was happening. I forwarded her emails for a month or so. But she wasn't doing anything to solve the problem. In fact, sometimes it was clear that she signed up for a service or newsletter and typed in her own email address incorrectly. 
    Eventually, I told her that this problem was her responsibility, and I would no longer forward her emails. She once again refused to change anything. I sensed that she thought I was bothering her, or being “mean.” She has missed out on some rather important sounding emails since them. I am baffled by her response. If I knew this was happening to my business emails, I would consider it an emergency that needs immediate solving.
    If you want to buy a .CO domain, that's fine for your website, but not your email! Stick to a gmail address instead, or anything else that does not invite confusion. 
  7. Like
    GEP got a reaction from cloudhutworks in The perils of using a .CO domain name   
    Lots of new business owners are finding that the .COM domain names they want are not available, or that they are considered "premium" domain names and are too expensive for a small business owner. Many are opting to buy .CO domain names instead. (.CO is the country code for Colombia, but the suffix is being marketed to American audiences as a close approximation of .COM). 
    I don't think there's anything wrong with having a website with a .CO url. But there is a serious problem with using a .CO domain name as your email address. Don't do it! 
    These days, most website are visited with a hyperlink, so the visitor does not need to know the exact url. However, email addresses are often keyed in by the sender. Many people will reflexively type .COM instead of .CO.
    Recently, another small business registered a domain name that is the same as mine, but with the .CO suffix. I get a lot of emails that are meant for her. When it started, I contacted her and let her know it was happening. I forwarded her emails for a month or so. But she wasn't doing anything to solve the problem. In fact, sometimes it was clear that she signed up for a service or newsletter and typed in her own email address incorrectly. 
    Eventually, I told her that this problem was her responsibility, and I would no longer forward her emails. She once again refused to change anything. I sensed that she thought I was bothering her, or being “mean.” She has missed out on some rather important sounding emails since them. I am baffled by her response. If I knew this was happening to my business emails, I would consider it an emergency that needs immediate solving.
    If you want to buy a .CO domain, that's fine for your website, but not your email! Stick to a gmail address instead, or anything else that does not invite confusion. 
  8. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in Wholesale accounts   
    Zapplication.org > Participating Events > Search keywords “San Diego”
    https://www.zapplication.org/event-info.php?ID=7204
    https://www.zapplication.org/event-info.php?ID=7416
  9. Like
    GEP got a reaction from PeppernPatches in Wholesale accounts   
    @CactusPots, you are new to the selling side of pottery. I caution you not to have a “me vs. them” attitude towards craft shows and retail galleries. As if these outlets owe you sales, and if sales don’t happen, it’s their fault. Successful selling happens when the artist and the outlet work as partners, and both sides understand and carry their responsibilities. 
    Anyone who says the words “craft shows are dead” probably has this misguided perspective. I’ve been through my share of unsuccessful art fairs. Even when there were obvious signs of incompetence by the show, I always blame myself for not picking up on it in advance. And I’ve been through many successful shows where I know the show did a fabulous job. And there are still artists on the internet the next day, complaining that the show did a terrible job, just because they personally had poor sales. 
    This forum tries to tell new sellers to be patient and persistent. It takes years to learn the ropes of selling. Nobody here was an overnight success. 
    I did wholesale for 9 years, and attended 6 trade shows during those years. I saw many, many potters who thought “craft shows were dead” and therefore “wholesale is where it’s at” and these artists tend to lose their shirts. Because they were blaming the craft show format for their lack of sales, rather than understanding their own responsibilities. The real problem for most of them was that their work was not of a quality that can compete with other professional potters. The truth is that wholesale buyers are not looking for something different than what you find at craft shows. They are looking for the exact same thing that sells well at craft shows. 
    As for whether a gallery should be able to raise the value of your work base on presentation, this is also incorrect. I was wholesaling my mugs for $17, meant to retail for $35 (which is what I was charging at shows then). Lots of galleries told me very honestly, “I love your work, but my customers think mugs should be $24.” So in a lot of cases it is the opposite. These galleries have the goal of selling. Raising the value of your work is not their mission. That's your job. Most of my wholesale orders went to galleries in the northeast, where higher prices are more common. I couldn’t sell to the midwest or the south. 
  10. Like
    GEP reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    These are waiting for glaze firing tomorrow or next.




  11. Like
    GEP reacted to DirtRoads in Wholesale accounts   
    The wholesale opportunity is definitely there.   I worked for a potter at a local wholesale show (Mississippi Wholesale Trade Show).  I used to work in Atlanta Merchandise Mart and saw quite a few potters up there.   I see a lot of pottery in gift shops and other specialty type retail stores.   You just have to be on top of your game to wholesale.   And watch the order taking.  I've seen several potters ruin themselves because they couldn't fulfill the wholesale orders they take at wholesale shows.
    And it's the retail store that can command the up pricing.    And usually (almost always) the right display goes with an upscale retail store.  You could put a great display in a low end/low traffic retail location and would get very little results.   The key is to get in the right retail stores.
    example:
    https://babcockgifts.bridgecatalog.com/collections.cfm/Good_Earth_Pottery
    That guy is in Starkville, MS about an hour from my location.  I would say Babcock's is about as upscale as you can get.  I see Eta B Pottery there too (located in Eta Mississippi.)  Pretty sure Good Earth doesn't do any direct retailing.  And if Eta B does, it's very limited.  You can do quite well with wholesale.   But it's my belief, it's hard to do both retail and wholesale.  Pick one and go for it.  I know some people do  both but the best I've seen do one or the other.   I could list at least 30 potters Ms, AL, Tn or La that do nothing but wholesale.  In my area, wholesale means more employees if you are successful.   We're are touching on this in another thread under "Output is Finite". 
     
  12. Like
    GEP got a reaction from bonetownstudio in First Art Fair   
    I agree with the advice posted above.
    My advice is to keep your mind free of expectations. Easier said than done, but since this is your first real art fair, your goal is to gain experience, not sales. I’ve seen a lot of noobs at their first big fair, who for some reason thought they were going to sell everything they brought, and end up feeling very disappointed and discouraged. Those expectations aren’t realistic for a new seller, especially if you are bringing a range of work without a cohesive style. 
    Instead of sales, you should be focusing on the logistics of doing a big 3 day show. You will learn so much just by doing one. Evaluate everything you did and make plans to do the next one better. Becoming good at doing shows is a long, incremental process of learning and practice. (just like learning to make pots, go figure). 
  13. Like
    GEP reacted to neilestrick in Core-lite shelf cracked in half   
    I have heard of those cracking, but no more than other shelves, and I've never seen it myself. All shelves crack eventually. I imagine having a large platter on it contributed to it heating unevenly top to bottom, and it just gave out. There was probably a hairline crack there already. Those big shelves also heat unevenly from the edge to the center, so lots of stresses at play there. You can clean up that edge with a masonry disc on a circular saw and use them as two half shelves, or just rub off the sharp edges with a silicon carbide stone or angle grinder.
  14. Like
    GEP reacted to cbarnes in First Art Fair   
    Thank you so much for all of the advice.  i feel a little less nervous.  i'm just going to try very hard not to have any expectations... do the best i can at customer interaction and more important LEARN.  i have found on my journey so far as a pottery, that you are always learning.  your comments helped me remember that.
     
  15. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in First Art Fair   
    I agree with the advice posted above.
    My advice is to keep your mind free of expectations. Easier said than done, but since this is your first real art fair, your goal is to gain experience, not sales. I’ve seen a lot of noobs at their first big fair, who for some reason thought they were going to sell everything they brought, and end up feeling very disappointed and discouraged. Those expectations aren’t realistic for a new seller, especially if you are bringing a range of work without a cohesive style. 
    Instead of sales, you should be focusing on the logistics of doing a big 3 day show. You will learn so much just by doing one. Evaluate everything you did and make plans to do the next one better. Becoming good at doing shows is a long, incremental process of learning and practice. (just like learning to make pots, go figure). 
  16. Like
    GEP got a reaction from Rae Reich in First Art Fair   
    I agree with the advice posted above.
    My advice is to keep your mind free of expectations. Easier said than done, but since this is your first real art fair, your goal is to gain experience, not sales. I’ve seen a lot of noobs at their first big fair, who for some reason thought they were going to sell everything they brought, and end up feeling very disappointed and discouraged. Those expectations aren’t realistic for a new seller, especially if you are bringing a range of work without a cohesive style. 
    Instead of sales, you should be focusing on the logistics of doing a big 3 day show. You will learn so much just by doing one. Evaluate everything you did and make plans to do the next one better. Becoming good at doing shows is a long, incremental process of learning and practice. (just like learning to make pots, go figure). 
  17. Like
    GEP got a reaction from tinypieces in Transporting your work to an art fair   
    I use foam sheets to separate my pots. It provides great cushioning without being bulky. I buy the 1/16 inch thick foam, 12” wide, with perforations every 12 inches. (thank you for asking this question ... you reminded me that I need to buy more foam)
    https://www.uline.com/BL_857/Uline-UPSable-Foam-Rolls
    I think the only thing you did wrong was let your “helpers” pack your pots :-)
    And “packing tight” is the right way to approach it. Pots that can”t move are safe. And it’s space efficient. 
  18. Like
    GEP got a reaction from cbarnes in First Art Fair   
    I agree with the advice posted above.
    My advice is to keep your mind free of expectations. Easier said than done, but since this is your first real art fair, your goal is to gain experience, not sales. I’ve seen a lot of noobs at their first big fair, who for some reason thought they were going to sell everything they brought, and end up feeling very disappointed and discouraged. Those expectations aren’t realistic for a new seller, especially if you are bringing a range of work without a cohesive style. 
    Instead of sales, you should be focusing on the logistics of doing a big 3 day show. You will learn so much just by doing one. Evaluate everything you did and make plans to do the next one better. Becoming good at doing shows is a long, incremental process of learning and practice. (just like learning to make pots, go figure). 
  19. Like
    GEP got a reaction from neilestrick in First Art Fair   
    I agree with the advice posted above.
    My advice is to keep your mind free of expectations. Easier said than done, but since this is your first real art fair, your goal is to gain experience, not sales. I’ve seen a lot of noobs at their first big fair, who for some reason thought they were going to sell everything they brought, and end up feeling very disappointed and discouraged. Those expectations aren’t realistic for a new seller, especially if you are bringing a range of work without a cohesive style. 
    Instead of sales, you should be focusing on the logistics of doing a big 3 day show. You will learn so much just by doing one. Evaluate everything you did and make plans to do the next one better. Becoming good at doing shows is a long, incremental process of learning and practice. (just like learning to make pots, go figure). 
  20. Like
    GEP got a reaction from DirtRoads in " for a business where the output is so finite "   
    There was a point, almost ten years ago, when I was doing a lot of wholesale and feeling like I couldn’t keep up, that I sat down with my accountant and said “I think I need an employee.” He talked me out of it. “You’ll spend your time being a manager instead of a potter. You won’t make any more money, and you’ll be less happy.” He has given me lots of good advice over the years. He has inside views into lots of self-employed peoples’ practice, and I can imagine he watched a lot of small companies go south this way. 
    He told me to design a workflow that I can handle by myself, and that is when I got serious about maximizing the dollar value of every hour spent working, And started cutting back on wholesale, realizing that it was not the best use of my time. 
    I schedule regular days off. I need them let my sore neck and back feel better, and to care of the rest of life’s responsibilities. I could probably output more if I wanted to as well, but don’t see the point. 
  21. Like
    GEP got a reaction from LeeU in " for a business where the output is so finite "   
    There was a point, almost ten years ago, when I was doing a lot of wholesale and feeling like I couldn’t keep up, that I sat down with my accountant and said “I think I need an employee.” He talked me out of it. “You’ll spend your time being a manager instead of a potter. You won’t make any more money, and you’ll be less happy.” He has given me lots of good advice over the years. He has inside views into lots of self-employed peoples’ practice, and I can imagine he watched a lot of small companies go south this way. 
    He told me to design a workflow that I can handle by myself, and that is when I got serious about maximizing the dollar value of every hour spent working, And started cutting back on wholesale, realizing that it was not the best use of my time. 
    I schedule regular days off. I need them let my sore neck and back feel better, and to care of the rest of life’s responsibilities. I could probably output more if I wanted to as well, but don’t see the point. 
  22. Like
    GEP got a reaction from DirtRoads in " for a business where the output is so finite "   
    Sounds right to me. I am outputting just about $75k worth of pots per year. By myself, and I have no interest in expanding or having employees. Though I need two kilns to do it. 
  23. Like
    GEP reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Got to open the kiln last night, almost everything came out great, which is a blessing for sure.  Started another glaze load last night and hope it's just as dope.
     



  24. Like
    GEP reacted to shawnhar in What’s on your workbench?   
    Sponge holders and berry bowls, just loaded the kiln with these and some 6 lb bowls.

  25. Like
    GEP reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    Not on my workbench, but to let you know what I have been doing. These shots were from delivery of pieces to Savannah Bee on June 24th.
     
     
     
     

     
     
     

     
     
     
     
     
    best, Pres
     
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