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How This Surface Was Created


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#1 MichaelP

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 10:23 PM

This is from the beautiful '500 cups' album by Lark Crafts.

 

Any idea how the surface of the cups was created? I mean the macro features: ridges/strips.

 

Carving (that's how it looks to me)? A material impregnated with slip and placed on the surface? Some other way?

 

Thank you.

 

Mike

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#2 MichaelP

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 10:35 PM

And while we are at this, do you think the surfaces of those two vases were manually carved?

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#3 schmism

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 12:29 AM

And while we are at this, do you think the surfaces of those two vases were manually carved?

If they are in fact carved, yes by hand.  Im not convinced they are not just flecs of glaze painted on with a brush that give it the appearance of 3 dimensional carving.

 

as to the first tee bowls.  They look like a variation on wavy/wiggle wire cut, or in this case straight wire cut either by hand (judgeing by the uneveness) vs useing something like a cheeze slicer.    If you draw the straight wire cut up at an angle (when stationary), or straight up while spinning, then stretch the bowl you should wind up with a surface close to that.

 

incase you havnt see the wiggle wire vids

or version 2



#4 Min

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 12:38 AM

I agree with schmism about the tea bowls being thrown, faceted then thrown some more with just one hand inside the pot.

 

The vases look slip cast with 2 colours of slip then the outer layer of slip is carved through to reveal the liner slip.  



#5 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 05:30 AM

Looks to me like thick slip has been applied after throwing with a rib or similar.



#6 TJR

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 08:24 AM

I think the three tea bowls were carved with a Sure Form tool.[Hardware section, or Home Depot].

You can get these blades curved. Then the first one was whacked with the side of a stick.

TJR.



#7 Chris Campbell

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:13 AM

The vases are likely slip cast with different colors of slip then carved through ... You can also layer colored slips on almost any unfired form and do the same thing. It's just a matter of waiting for each layer to be touch dry before putting on the next. Then waiting for the right time to begin carving through the layers of color. Too soon and it's a mushy mess ... Too late and it chips ... Just right and you carve through with control.

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#8 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:46 AM

As for the three tea bowls, I'm in camp throw-facet-stretch. I do not think they are carved.

 

Michael Merritt AKA Try Pottery has a very quick YouTube video that shows a variation on the process that I find more effective that the Mark Peters way version. Check it out here: https://www.youtube....h?v=S7tviAa3oT0. The big difference is that in the Peters video from CAD, you go directly to a thick cone, then stretch to a bowl. In Merritt's version, you throw a thick bowl, then cone it back in before faceteing and stretching. Peters' end product is GORGEOUS, but in trying to learn this process I found initiating the bowl's curve from the start made for a more bowl-like form. I continually ended up with a nasty learner's curve/shoulder when going at it the way from the Peters video.

 

There is another video I'd highly recommend that touches on this process. The Goldmark Gallery has a video focused on Lisa Hammond - her pots, process, studio, life, etc - that can be found here: https://www.youtube....h?v=JSDhR5__kRM. The faceting/stretching business starts at about 3:30, but the whole video is a great watch. Really all the Goldmark short film spotlights are great.

 

Cheers,

 

Chris


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#9 Wyndham

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 10:54 AM

As for the three tea bowls, I'm in camp throw-facet-stretch. I do not think they are carved.

 

I'm there too. They look like a cheese cutter did the faceting then a throwing stick on the inside to stretch them.

That's really cool. Gotta try it.

Wyndham



#10 MichaelP

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 10:14 PM

Thank you everyone for trying to solve the mystery. :) I'm now convinced that there was a cheese cutter involved.

And thank you for all the links. Lisa Hammond's work is quite interesting indeed (maybe because symmetry, classic shapes and high gloss are not things that I find especially attractive most of the time). 



#11 Natania

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 06:03 AM

Along the same lines - I was recently wondering how this surface was created/carved? It looks like a mark that a wood carving tool would leave, but surely carving each individual line wouldn't result in such a uniform look?

 

 

http://akio-nukaga.com/



#12 Stellaria

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 08:35 AM

That just looks drape-molded to me.

#13 Natania

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 09:41 AM

True - a drape mold would work to make that plate, but the same texture is on other pots that are more verticals (look on his website under "work")...?



#14 Min

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 10:57 AM

Along the same lines - I was recently wondering how this surface was created/carved? It looks like a mark that a wood carving tool would leave, but surely carving each individual line wouldn't result in such a uniform look?

 

 

http://akio-nukaga.com/

 

Fluted. Lots of tools work to do this, here's one I like: http://shop.clay-pla...or-fluting.aspx



#15 ayjay

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 10:58 AM

 I was recently wondering how this surface was created/carved? It looks like a mark that a wood carving tool would leave, but surely carving each individual line wouldn't result in such a uniform look?

 

I think there are potters good enough to do that: there's one in my class who does very neat, tidy, and symmetrical fluting, (he's very experienced and only there to use the facilities, not learning as such, if you can ever say that).

 

Either freehand with a loop tool or using a gauge rod and a stop on the tool, final trimming when leather hard will produce the effect near the rim.



#16 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 01:31 PM

I'm in camp fluting. I have a mirror in my house (thrown with the intent to be a platter, but it cracked as it dried) that has a very similar look. I produced the marks with the rounded end of a Kemper trimming tool.


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On Instagram @chris_throws_pots
 

 

 

 





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