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jrgpots

Diy Burners

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jrgpots    231

I just tested the twin burners for my small electric-gas conversion.  I haven't set the baffles on the air intakes yet. So I used a little foil to reduce the air flow.  The burners are burning at 3 psi in the second pic.

 

I have cut three holes in  my small electric kiln (18" dia x 24" ht.)  I still need to set the bricks for the chimney and buy a thermcoupler. 

 

I just wanted to show my progress.

 

Jed

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Biglou13    202

I'm impressed

 

But I'm easy. Oo ohh shiny object..... Ooo ooh fire!

 

What is size of each gas orifice!

 

I was given the parts to a forced air burner x2. Can you post close ups of your connectors, angles, All the plumbing including gass line connections. Plumbing connectors etc etc are foreign to me. Thanks

 

And big congrats on the fire. Err. Burners

 

Ps.

What's the next better thing to pictures of burners............videos with sound of burners

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

My DIY burners had the bell reducers with the smaller end at the tip . They went from2" to 1.5" I think. It has been quite a few decades since

I built them. The basic idea was to mix the gas and air then compress it as it exited the tipi. What ever works.

Marcia

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jrgpots    231

My burner tube is 1" diameter black pipe. with 1" to 1 1/2" burning nozzle. The gas line is 1/4". The gas nozzle is a mig welding tip .024" (the smallest diameter tip for propane.) Natural gas tip would be .030 or .035".

 

I used a brass compression fitting 1/4 to 1/8 to hold the mig tip in place at the end of the 1/4 copper pipe.

 

I used a separate cut off valve on each burner line.

 

I used a high pressure regulator and a 3/8" gas hose.

 

I will post a video Wednesday of the burners and their noise. I have to refill my propane tank first.

 

Jed

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Mark C.    1,807

My DIY burners had the bell reducers with the smaller end at the tip . They went from2" to 1.5" I think. It has been quite a few decades since

I built them. The basic idea was to mix the gas and air then compress it as it exited the tipi. What ever works.

Marcia

Mine where 2  inch down to 1 /12 as well-that was in the 70's-natural draft. They still work well as I loaned them out for a few years until they could afford cast venturi ones. They have been in the shed for many years now.

Mark

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jrgpots    231

 

My DIY burners had the bell reducers with the smaller end at the tip . They went from2" to 1.5" I think. It has been quite a few decades since

I built them. The basic idea was to mix the gas and air then compress it as it exited the tipi. What ever works.

Marcia

 

Mine where 2  inch down to 1 /12 as well-that was in the 70's-natural draft. They still work well as I loaned them out for a few years until they could afford cast venturi ones. They have been in the shed for many years now.

Mark

Should I neck down the nozzle to 3/4"?

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JLowes    28

I use a single weed burner (propane) from Harbor Freight (looks just like the ones Mr. Leach uses) to fire my raku kiln (20" diam x 24" high).  It works fine, but the end of the burner is galvanized steel and is showing deterioration after many firings.  Those firings are 45-60 minutes, not 10-12 hours as one might do for a gas reduction firing, so having easily replaceable parts is good. I don't know how many Cone 10 firings one of these might be good for.  Of course, I watch the Harbor freight sales ads and use the 20% or 25% off coupons and have built a reserve of burners at good prices.  I am still on the first one after a couple of years of occasional firing.

 

I do like the looks of this pair and it appeals to the do-it-yourselfer in me.

 

John

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Stick with your design as is and see how it works. It should be fine. Mine were for propane and the gas was introduce midway down the 2" pipe by a black pipe inserted through the larger pipe at 90 degrees with 5 tiny holes drilled into it.The blower was on the rear. Air intake was adjusted with a lid screwed on the intakes of the squirrel cage blower (from Grainger)

 

Weed burners are ok for raku but waste a lot of gas IMHO. I like my set up from Marc Ward which I h've had for nearly 20 years. I use very little gas per firings. I have my gauge set at 3.5 to 4 psi. Never turn it up over 1/2 way at the burner.

Marcia

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jrgpots    231

Stick with your design as is and see how it works. It should be fine. Mine were for propane and the gas was introduce midway down the 2" pipe by a black pipe inserted through the larger pipe at 90 degrees with 5 tiny holes drilled into it.The blower was on the rear. Air intake was adjusted with a lid screwed on the intakes of the squirrel cage blower (from Grainger)

 

Weed burners are ok for raku but waste a lot of gas IMHO. I like my set up from Marc Ward which I h've had for nearly 20 years. I use very little gas per firings. I have my gauge set at 3.5 to 4 psi. Never turn it up over 1/2 way at the burner.

Marcia

Thanks Marcia.

 

jed

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Mark C.    1,807

I also would try your setup before any changes-Propane is so different from what I made for natural gas anyway.

I used 1 1/2 inch flame retention nozzels on the ends 

Yours may work super with no more modifications-test the out 1st.

Mark

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Brian Reed    23

I have never seen copper pipe used for this type of setup?  I am not a metallurgist, but I thought copper had a low melting point.

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Tyler Miller    331

Copper also wicks away heat very quickly.  Copper tuyeres have been used for centuries in forges, as well as in iron smelting operations.

 

On thing that does make everything last a little longer is to close the baffles on the air intakes as soon as the burners are off.  You can get a chimney effect going on if you don't, with the air pulled in at the burner outlet and out through the intake, pulling heat over the copper.

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jrgpots    231

Copper also wicks away heat very quickly.  Copper tuyeres have been used for centuries in forges, as well as in iron smelting operations.

 

On thing that does make everything last a little longer is to close the baffles on the air intakes as soon as the burners are off.  You can get a chimney effect going on if you don't, with the air pulled in at the burner outlet and out through the intake, pulling heat over the copper.

good  tip about turning off the baffles.  It's good to know.

 

jed

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