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Marcia Selsor

Foil Saggar Results

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

the chemical fumes could damage the coils if they escape from the foil saggars.. The foil can begin to break dawn. Melting point in 1100 but the foil can go higher depending.

I know some people who have done it in electric , but I can't recommend it.

 

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Excellent Marcia, what did you have in the sagger?

I put some lemon skins inside some of the pots. I brushed, sponge dabbed, various nasty chemicals like nickel chloride, copper sulphate, etc. and sprinkled some salts on the surfaces with a damp sponge. I have a lot of old chemicals around some dating back to the 60s but their labels look more like they are from the 30s.. I like silver nitrate, table salt, epsom salt, strontium chloride, etc. If I don't like the way it turned out, I 'll put some more stuff on it and fire it again.

Marcia

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Babs    386

Assuming I don't get the foil in touch with the electrics, how do you tink it would go in an electric kiln?

Thanks Marcia, I use tartaric and citric in some lemon syrup i make for a summer drink, get both of these products in baking areas of supermarkets here. I think, hmm, oxalic acid is found in silverbett, chard stalks and leaves, and there is another acid in rhubarb leaves may be worth fiddling with.

Lemon Syrup

juice of 12 lemons

Rind of 6

1 tablespoon citric

1 Tablespoon tartaric acid

4lbs sugar.

Dissolve the above in 3 pints of boiling water.

Cool '

Bottle.

Pour an inch in a large glass top with soda water or iced water.

MMM

Great after a hot day in the pottery shed!

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I will have to give that a try. Sometimes the heat down here is unbearable. My lemon tree still has lemons and is blooming already,

I haven't looked in the grocery store for this. I will try to do that.

.

Marcia

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Marcia: I like the soft, gray touch of your new pieces. Congrats on the success.

 

Hmmmm, I always wanted to try the foil saggars too in an electric kiln, but was a bit hesitant because of the fumes. I think I'll wait a bit longer...

 

Babs: thanks bunches for the recipe. I'am sure summer will come along some day....

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Benzine    610

That's quite a "Witches Brew" you use Marcia, and that term is in no way an assumption or implication of your personality.....

 

You say you use silver nitrate. I wonder what would happen, if you used an exhausted photo fixer, which would contain silver haylide?

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

witches brew sounds accurate. I just mix small quantities 50 grams and 1/2 pint of hot water. I apply with a sponge.I don't want any left overs.

I don't know about the silver solution. Sounds like it could be interesting. I like the granules and dab them onto the surface lightly otherwise there is too much black. Lightly and they fume silver. Epsom salts made clouds or bleached out some of the color. Plan to try as granules.

Marcia

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Benzine    610

Marcia, I just so happened to be mixing up photo chemicals this morning. After this conversation, I reread the ingredients list. I would wager many of them would yield interesting results. The developer has some type of alkaline agent, the stop bath a mild acid, and the two part fixer I use has both. The acid portion is sulfuric acid....It smells fabulous. And many of the chemicals come in powdered form, which would be handy for sagger. I even have some used fixer, that I let sit out, as it can't go down the drain, and it crystalized nicely. That could easily be used.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

The foil is the sagger. I am not familiar with these as it has been about 30 years since I worked in a dark room. Just follow the precautions for working with these chemicals.

Marcia

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Babs    386

The foil is the sagger. I am not familiar with these as it has been about 30 years since I worked in a dark room. Just follow the precautions for working with these chemicals.

Marcia

Go YOU mad haut rakuteurs! I reread my kitchen recipe and you have to add 1 Tablespoon of Epsom salts with all the rest before water is added, to the syrup recipe mentioned above!

Refreshing. Have made it without but the old recipe from my granny has it in it, and she'd know.

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Bob Coyle    113

I recently tried potassium permanganate solution for some of my "f aux" pit fired pots. I was expecting it to produce a black manganese dioxide color but instead I got a medium tan buff color. Not what I expected but it could be another color for your palette.

 

I should mention potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizer, but if you keep the solution in a bottle away from organic materials, it is no worse then ferric chloride. Wear gloves since it stains your hands if you get it on you.

 

After organic chemistry lab, us organic chemists used to look like we had a hell of a nicotine problem with the nitric acid and permanganate stains on ourfingers.

post-45594-0-34346400-1390958292_thumb.jpg

post-45594-0-34346400-1390958292_thumb.jpg

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Bob,

this has Potassium Permangnate. It was among my pieces from last May. It is currently on display at the Yellowstone Art Museum 45th Annual Auction.I get pinkish browns with this.I listed the chemicals in a post in May or June.

 

 

 

Marcia

post-1954-0-24361300-1391005447_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-24361300-1391005447_thumb.jpg

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Bob Coyle    113

Beautiful piece Marcia. I love the subtle gradations of color you get on your pots.

 

I have been trying to get some blues with cobalt salts but end up with mostly greys. Have you done any work with cobalt salts?

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Pres    896

Marcia, Bob and Dale, Love the surfaces! They have so much going on that anything more than the understated forms would be a "Tower of Babel"

 

Back in the 70's my school had a forced air gas incinerator in  the basement. A colleague of mine would put pieces in large tin cans sealed up than put them into the incinerator when they were getting ready to fire. We would pack them with all sorts of wood shavings from the wood shops on the opposite hall. These we would soak in anything we could come up with from industrial cleaning solutions to chemicals from the chem department sulfates and hydrates were often included.  We were just experimenting, but  did get an occasional neat piece.   A few years later a new fire chief came in inspecting all of the schools and forced closure of the incinerator.  Funny, he claimed my Ceramics studio safer than the Science department! They got new money out of that!

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Babs    386

Marcia: I like the soft, gray touch of your new pieces. Congrats on the success.

 

Hmmmm, I always wanted to try the foil saggars too in an electric kiln, but was a bit hesitant because of the fumes. I think I'll wait a bit longer...

 

Babs: thanks bunches for the recipe. I'am sure summer will come along some day....

Beyond Wax Resist

This guy uses foil saggars in his electric kiln and writes that it has no or little illl effects.

I discovered this link form the post on Elmers Glue as a resist so thanks to whoever posted it there. Matt Oz.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Lastest results from yesterday's firing

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3761-three-medium-size-foil-sagger-pots/

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3762-5-small-foil-sagger/

I think the center white one is really intriguing

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3763-foilgroupof5sm-copy/

 

I keep firing and adding chemicals until I am satisfied with the results. I fired a few three times yesterday.

Marcia

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Babs    386

Lastest results from yesterday's firing

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3761-three-medium-size-foil-sagger-pots/

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3762-5-small-foil-sagger/

I think the center white one is really intriguing

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3763-foilgroupof5sm-copy/

 

I keep firing and adding chemicals until I am satisfied with the results. I fired a few three times yesterday.

Marcia

All exquisite, love the paler central one in first link.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

This process is so fascinating , it is like magic. I am having fun doing this.Some chemicals lighten or belch the previous chemical. Really will take a while to master.

 

Marcia

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Bob Coyle    113

 

Some chemicals lighten or belch the previous chemical. Really will take a while to master.

 

I have found that if you brush copper citrate solution into areas where there is ferric chloride, you get an interesting bleaching effect where they meet. I am  trying to fine tune this so I can get it reproducibly. I think that the ferric chloride needs to dry some before you add the copper citrate.

 

The attached photo is an example of the effect.

 

Another interesting effect I found, was that some of the copper citrate that is not completely oxidized, will react with water to give an interesting greenish grey color.

post-45594-0-24635700-1392740874_thumb.jpg

post-45594-0-24635700-1392740874_thumb.jpg

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Bob, epsom salt also bleaches out the color of the previous layer.

Babs, here is a picture of a loaded kiln. The bear pots was from something else and I was cleaning it up.If you do this in an electric kiln, really wrap the foil tight so it doesn't let fumes escape.

Marcia

post-1954-0-51265200-1392816352_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-51265200-1392816352_thumb.jpg

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