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Pam S

Amaco Ancient Jasper Question

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You are all very welcome. I don't like anyone to struggle with one of my creations. I am also glad you all like the look of ANCIENT JASPER.

 

Steve...........

 

 

 

Steve,

 

Once you have fired too thin, will adding glaze and refiring be an option to revitalize the Ancient Jasper, or should one just move on from that pot? I have a couple of the "eggplant" colored variations.

 

John Lowes

Sandy Springs, GA

 

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John,

 

 

I have not had great luck adding more glaze to a thin glaze piece but I would also never tell anyone not to try. As a general rule I would say start over with a new pot. If you decide to try adding more a good suggestion is to warm the pot so the glaze will be applied and stay where you put it. I put pots into a cold oven and heat it until the pot is 200 F. You need to soak it there until the pot becomes warm all the way through. 15-20 minutes should do it. Let me know how it turns out.

 

Steve...

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nlynn    0

I have tried several of the Potter's Choice glazes and I have had very little success. Not one with the exception of Temmoku has turned out as they are marketed. They basically look like mud. Temmoku is the most consistant, but even then has variations.

 

I have noticed that the glazes look best on textured areas, and straight walls. However, I would like to see the same effect across the entire piece, not mud and beauty.

 

I feel a little decieved in that, if I am to apply thick coats, certain firing scheduled and clay bodies that I should be told by Ammaco.

 

I fired Blue Midnight yesterday on a white clay body and only the straight walls had any texture or movement in the glaze. The rest was almost black.

 

I also tried Deep Fire Brick Red under Ancient Jasper on the inside of a bowl and only Ancient Jasper on the outside. The outside turned out almost black, but the inside is absolutely beautiful.

 

And yes, even on the outside there was some movement with the texture, but how much texture in a piece do you have to have?

 

Albany Slip isn't much better. I tried it on several clay bodies and I got no breaking except at the handle point on a coffee cup.

 

I will pursue the Fire Brick Red under Ancient Jasper again with a 6 hour fire as suggested above.

 

This combination as in the pictures above is beautiful.

 

But Ancient Jasper alone and many of the other Potter's Choice glazes mostly turn to mud. That's my experience.

 

nlynn

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nlynn    0

This is a terrible picture and certainly does not do the glaze justice, but I wanted to show you Deep Fire Brick Red under Ancient Jasper.

 

I used a white clay body, bisque fired to 04. Inside the bowl I put one coat of Deep Fire Brick Red and then with a fan brush added 2 more coats of Fire Brick in areas around the sides and on the bottom. Then I put two coats of Ancient Jasper and fired to cone 6.

 

There is some red, but I think it is from the Deep Fire Brick Red and not the Jasper. The Jasper did break and move with texture. I really like it.

 

nlynn

 

Okay, I thought I put a picture up, but I guess I don't know how. I'll try again.

 

photo.jpg

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Nlynn,

While I have had issues with Ancient Jasper (but will keep trying), I have had great luck with many of the Potters Choice glazes. Especially the Albany Slip Brown. I found the link below that might help diagnose the issue you are having - if it is a glaze thickness issue. They have test tiles with different thicknesses. The 'mud' ones tended to be too thin.

Anyway, good luck.

Marc

 

 

http://www.amaco.com/learn-about-potters-choice-glazes/#pc-application

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nlynn    0

Marc,

 

Yes I have seen that page and I am very interested. I understand that thick applications get the effects of the glaze. However, my reluctance comes from the prevention of running and sticking to the kiln shelf.

 

I do the type of glazing where less is best and I do this quite well with Coyote glazes and adding shino's on the top of the piece for variations.

 

I plan on my next fire to really slop on the Potter's Choice glazes.

 

However, can you advise me as to how high I should make my foot?

 

Do heavy coats tend to run or is it stable?

 

Also, when you say thin, do you mean the thickness of the glaze itself, number of coats or the thickness of each coat?

 

Thanks,

 

nancy

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Nancy,

I understand your reluctance as my past kiln firing had me thanking the kiln gods for a thick coating of kiln wash.

I was actually using Coyote Glazes during that firing. I love the Ice blue but like it thick for different effects. In these cases I use a pedestal and catcher just to be safe.

 

I don't think I can tell you what is thick enough. Perhaps do some test tiles first so you can see what happens at different thickeness under your specific firing program.

You could even put them on a catch plate to be 100% safe.

 

I can tell you I have had great luck with the stability of the Potters choice glazes. If I were to compare thicknesses, I would say I am more confident about the stability of them than the Coyote glazes, which I love by the way.

 

Good luck!

Marc

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nlynn    0

Nancy,

I understand your reluctance as my past kiln firing had me thanking the kiln gods for a thick coating of kiln wash.

I was actually using Coyote Glazes during that firing. I love the Ice blue but like it thick for different effects. In these cases I use a pedestal and catcher just to be safe.

 

I don't think I can tell you what is thick enough. Perhaps do some test tiles first so you can see what happens at different thickeness under your specific firing program.

You could even put them on a catch plate to be 100% safe.

 

I can tell you I have had great luck with the stability of the Potters choice glazes. If I were to compare thicknesses, I would say I am more confident about the stability of them than the Coyote glazes, which I love by the way.

 

Good luck!

Marc

 

 

Yes I do notice that the Potter's Choice never creeped beyond the bottom wax line, eventhough I glazed with thinner coats. It seems to be as stable as Versa, but I'm not ready to have that much confidence.

 

I will practice on tiles and also use a catch plate. I can't wait to get the Albany Slip effect on a piece. I love that glaze.

 

I did read on another forum that when he used Ancient Jasper in thin coats, it turned black and ran all over the place. He too learned the hard way that it takes thick coats and applied quickly.

 

I am not jumping for joy over my bowl above, as the outside is mud, but the inside is absolutely beautiful.

 

Thanks Marc, Nancy

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cracked pot    7

Nancy,

I understand your reluctance as my past kiln firing had me thanking the kiln gods for a thick coating of kiln wash.

I was actually using Coyote Glazes during that firing. I love the Ice blue but like it thick for different effects. In these cases I use a pedestal and catcher just to be safe.

 

I don't think I can tell you what is thick enough. Perhaps do some test tiles first so you can see what happens at different thickeness under your specific firing program.

You could even put them on a catch plate to be 100% safe.

 

I can tell you I have had great luck with the stability of the Potters choice glazes. If I were to compare thicknesses, I would say I am more confident about the stability of them than the Coyote glazes, which I love by the way.

 

Good luck!

Marc

 

 

Yes I do notice that the Potter's Choice never creeped beyond the bottom wax line, eventhough I glazed with thinner coats. It seems to be as stable as Versa, but I'm not ready to have that much confidence.

 

I will practice on tiles and also use a catch plate. I can't wait to get the Albany Slip effect on a piece. I love that glaze.

 

I did read on another forum that when he used Ancient Jasper in thin coats, it turned black and ran all over the place. He too learned the hard way that it takes thick coats and applied quickly.

 

I am not jumping for joy over my bowl above, as the outside is mud, but the inside is absolutely beautiful.

 

Thanks Marc, Nancy

 

 

I would agree with Marc about the stability of Amaco glazes. I also like Coyote glazes but would never apply them as thick as I do Amaco PC glazes. I apply three thick coats of PC glazes, letting them dry in between layers. For A. Jasper, I then apply another coat on the rim. Also, when firing A. Jasper, I put it on the bottom kiln shelf, in the middle, surrounded by taller pieces.

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Masha7    0

I've used this on dark buff stoneware with 3 thick irregular coats applied with a hog bristle brush, inner surfaces only. Wow! It really pops, the reds are incredible. With a thinner coating, it's a dark espresso with red, ochre and blue in the textured areas. Once I got used to it, I learned to love it. But I never use it on exteriors, it flows sometimes....

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Pam S    6

Even with the advise of the makers, I've given up on Ancient Jasper. It's never come out like the photos on the web site. Not even close. I've tried different firing schedules, different clay bodies and it always turns out black to dark brown with little bits of red and eggplant. Guess I'm not holding my mouth right...

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Benhim    3

It's amazing how many companies don't respond. I've contacted about a dozen companies in the last three months that didn't respond. In each case I was prepared to purchase materials from them and said so in the email. No wonder our economy is down, no body is doing their job.

... It would be nice if all the suppliers actually tried to help point us in the right direction every once in a while.

 

 

Yes, it would... but in my experience they don't reply to questions emailed to them directly, so I wouldn't hold my breath that they will post here. I wouldn't treat my customers that way, but I guess that's pretty old-school these days.;)

 

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~janie    8

I have a whole shelf of pots glazed with Ancient Jasper, waiting to be fired. Now I am wondering if it is not enough, too much or just right.....

 

A friend glazed big plates with AJ, and it ran, to the point of ruining shelves. I am afraid that I may not have enough on my pots. I think I will add a bit more...

 

A very instructive thread. I am very appreciative of Steve Lampron.

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klen11    15

I wonder if maybe firing at too high of a temperature is causing the browning. It's simply a guess. Another thing could be the ceramic bisque you are using. Some ceramic bisque is made with too much silicate and ends up changing the paints natural color.

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I'm anxious to try this glaze. It seems to be one that acts very differently if it's vertical, rather than horizontal.

At my supplier, one of the staff had a sculptural piece that she did in Ancient Jasper and it was amazing.

 

I'm wondering though, for those who've used it, do you think that this pic is accurate, from your experience?

pc53-application-tiles-and-sake-cup-pp.jpg

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cracked pot    7

I'm anxious to try this glaze. It seems to be one that acts very differently if it's vertical, rather than horizontal.

At my supplier, one of the staff had a sculptural piece that she did in Ancient Jasper and it was amazing.

 

I'm wondering though, for those who've used it, do you think that this pic is accurate, from your experience?

pc53-application-tiles-and-sake-cup-pp.jpg

 

It looks pretty much like my results but I would add that I place the pieces with this glaze in the middle of the bottom kiln shelf. It seems to need a slightly cooler location. I fire to cone 6.

 

 

 

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patinlago    1

I've been using this glaze over a year now and it didn't start out well. Here's what I found: First the clay makes a big difference. I settled on b-mix or cone 5 porcelain as I get consistently nice finishes. I also dip my pieces so I just hold them in for a 4 count. Fast fire to cone 5 as the engineer suggested in a previous post. the important thing is not to skimp on the glaze. It doesn't seem to matter where I place them in the kiln. I am a new potter so I am not speaking as an authority just experience. Good luck.

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I love Ancient Jasper. I brush it on and have achieved awesome rusty reds as well as deep-space blacks. Here are two pieces with Ancient Jasper brushed on in four heavy-ish coats. The lid on the urn has a particularly heavy 4th brush coat.

 

Electric to cone 6.

post-8563-132431459302_thumb.jpg

 

post-8563-132431460703_thumb.jpg

post-8563-132431459302_thumb.jpg

post-8563-132431460703_thumb.jpg

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grayfree    3

Hi I am a new potter of 6 months and have a little studio. I loved the idea of this glaze but have ruined many a piece with it. Even one of my teachers has not had much luck with it. I will agree that it has to go on thick ....It will look way to thick. I had one piece that came out beautiful with it. I put oatmeal on the inside of a utensil holder and anceint jasper on the outside. I put a little oatmeal on the lip and it really did nicely. Lots of blue cream and a little redish tinges here and there. Haven't been able to repeat.

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SunsetBay    1

I like Ancient Jasper (and Potter's Choice glazes in general, though sometimes I feel they are too glossy on untextured pieces). Here are two examples of my usual results. I do a 9-hour Cone 6 glaze firing in a manual Skutt kiln (3 hours on low, 3 on medium, then turn to high; kiln-sitter shuts kiln off pretty reliably after 9 hours total). I haven't done anything special in terms of placing the pieces in the kiln. Oh, btw, the red inside the mug is Firebrick Red, not Ancient Jasper.

post-9780-133201449928_thumb.jpg

post-9780-133201460588_thumb.jpg

Also, when I had a question for Amaco and emailed it, I got a very swift and helpful response from the company.

post-9780-133201449928_thumb.jpg

post-9780-133201460588_thumb.jpg

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Bill T.    4

I like Ancient Jasper (and Potter's Choice glazes in general, though sometimes I feel they are too glossy on untextured pieces). Here are two examples of my usual results. I do a 9-hour Cone 6 glaze firing in a manual Skutt kiln (3 hours on low, 3 on medium, then turn to high; kiln-sitter shuts kiln off pretty reliably after 9 hours total). I haven't done anything special in terms of placing the pieces in the kiln. Oh, btw, the red inside the mug is Firebrick Red, not Ancient Jasper.

post-9780-133201449928_thumb.jpg

post-9780-133201460588_thumb.jpg

Also, when I had a question for Amaco and emailed it, I got a very swift and helpful response from the company.

 

 

I am getting somewhat different results probably due to lack of texturing. This is over Firebrick on Laguna Speckled Buff. I like what it did for you too.

post-6443-133208572336_thumb.jpg

post-6443-133208572336_thumb.jpg

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teardrop    2

We pulled this out of the kiln last night and were completely blown away.

 

2 (dipped) coats of PC Firebrick Red (from dry mix) on the bottom.

 

3 heavy/drippy coats of PC Ancient Jasper (straight from a well shaken bottle) applied with a bulb syringe on top. The stuff was globbed on liberally and the runs on the side were fat and thick.

 

The only surprise was that the saturation GOLD I placed on the top edges came out a silver/metallic. Though I LOVE what it did...that wasn't what I thought it was gonna do.

 

I will definetely be working more with this combo in the future!

 

teardrop

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post-8561-133460694292_thumb.jpg

post-8561-133460696141_thumb.jpg

post-8561-133460698816_thumb.jpg

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teardrop    2

More bad/newbie-made pottery glazed in Ancient Jasper

 

 

brushed on heavily (5 coats) at the top...lessening to 2 coats near the bottom....

 

 

hangtag in place...(thanks for the idea) and ready to be sold to people who evidently have even less of a clue what "good" pottery is :lol: than even I do...

 

 

yes...I'm funnin' with ya...sorta...

post-8561-134123476978_thumb.jpg

post-8561-134123476978_thumb.jpg

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