Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Kohaku    22

Thanks guys. Honestly, it had a few minor issues with proportions, so it was a relatively painless lesson. I get to remake it now...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

John, how complicated can it be? You load the kiln, seal it up, start some wood on fire, and keep adding more wood until it gets hot......Simple.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Care to share a failure that resulted in a learning leap? :unsure:

 

Don't use an outhouse until you look under the seat.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

BWAHHAHAHAA  this is why I love you jim! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My reply to the question... just take a brief look at my past posts.. I am sure you find enough to entertain this thread.  I have only been making pottery since may of '12.  After taking a 5 week (once per week) class at the local art museum I decided to go out and buy a pottery wheel and use a hand me down kiln from my father in law.  I have been using manufactured glazes and haven't even mixed my own yet, so I have a lot more to learn. I just ordered some dry mix from glaze mixer so to avoid screwing it all up.  We will see if I can trust the online recipes. lol 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,088

John, how complicated can it be? You load the kiln, seal it up, start some wood on fire, and keep adding more wood until it gets hot......Simple.....

 

I keep waiting for John to answer this post .... now I am afraid his brain might have exploded!!!! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

 

John, how complicated can it be? You load the kiln, seal it up, start some wood on fire, and keep adding more wood until it gets hot......Simple.....

 

I keep waiting for John to answer this post .... now I am afraid his brain might have exploded!!!! :D

 

He "liked" the post, so he found it to be, at the least, amusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Babs    386

Well I got a bit rash with the resist brush on a no. of teapots, where the lids sit and as it was a tenmoku glaze the white clay body exposed was ugly. I then heated and coated the area with, a don't ask me why, C03 glaze and fired the said pots to C03...result a beautiful subtle glaze, satin, over all the  pots, ugly areas acceptable but shiny!! Lots of lessons here but a new glaze for me! 

Wouldn't have thought of double firing a high fired glaze to that Cone after first firing but it's worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Babs    386

Perhaps this should be called unexpected outcome, because of the negative association of the F word. Shoulsd be banned really! Esp. by teachers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,088

Actually,  I use the "F" word .... Failure that is ... on purpose. 

Everyone fails and in most cases, lives to  tell the tale.

Make mistakes ... just don't keep making the same mistake. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Babs    386

Yes Chris, how right you are! Failing is an important learning point or can be. Positive lessons can be learned, depends on the atmosphere and the reaction to the failure, not the person but the action of the person, some people cannot separate those two.

 Still wouldn't say it out loud unless I was sure of the person's  confidence. Probably ask a few questions, get the thoughts going etc. Why what to try next etc. 

Failure is used as a pejorative, hard to get away from that.

Ability to cope with the situation. Expecting too much etc, an easy ride... Not succeeding needs to happen.

Going back to the drawing board etc all comes with positive self esteem which all students do not have.

For me, part of the course, work it out, like to think I learn from failure but quite often do things hoping  that, hey I might just get away with that this time, call me dumb??? Better than Failure??

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,088

"For me, part of the course, work it out, like to think I learn from failure but quite often do things hoping that, hey I might just get away with that this time, call me dumb??? Better than Failure??"

 

I hear you! If I had a dollar for every time I wasted effort chasing a crack in green ware ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

It is a huge part of the learning curve. I hope you post some pics of the kiln load, Chris. Any failures especially (if any) and tell us what you gleaned from them. To me, that is what "failures" provide.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,088

I just watched the tv documentary on Diane Nyad (sp?) ... The woman who "failed" three times before she made the swim from Cuba to Florida. All I can say is WOW ... her courage to come back from incredible setbacks was truly amazing to see. Luckily she did not believe those who wanted her to stop because she had failed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeFaul    79

 

 

Care to share a failure that resulted in a learning leap? :unsure:

 

Beware of foreign clay bodies as they may not dry at the same rate as the one you're use too...

post-58862-0-18571100-1386714571_thumb.jpg

post-58862-0-18571100-1386714571_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob Coyle    113

Remember what Ben Franklin said... "there is many a slip between the cup and the absolutely perfect, primo, balanced, finely glazed and fired mug."

 

Or maybe it was Aristotle.. or Paul Soldner???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jolieo    45

Hi my experience is failure is either trying to reach for something new or carelessness.sometimes carelessness yields surprising or beautiful results. The reaching can teach so much but usually much more on reflection. Usually I am so single mindedly going for what I think I can achieve that only later do I realize what I learned from that experience. Also I believe that there is more to be learned and repeated in a group that is cohesive ( not an easy thing to come by). A honed group mind can steer new developments to an advantage w/o losing the goal. I can't say I have ever had a true ephipeny , but my mistakes take the fear out of creating, if I believe that I already have done my worst , can only get better right? Also I always stash my failures. I have found that looking at them later does two things for me: the never are as bad as I remember, I usually kinda like them. And they show a clear path of my development , which encourages me to continue. Jolie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

Test tiles, and an organized test tile panel will help to improve on your glaze problems Judd. One of the first things I did was to create a board with a grid on it where I would attach the test tiles with screws. Then I started with test tiles for each of the glazes we had, with the clay we used. Each tile was incised with a line, and had an iron stain painted on. When dipped we dipped one coat on 3/4 of tile, then a second coat on 1/2 tile. backs were cleaned, tiles were fired. After assessment these were mounted on the grid board. Then we started other tiles with combinations of glazes over glazes. Combos were painted on back with stain. These got mounted at lower part of the board.

 

As to pinch pots, you may find that turning out the lights for part of the period, forcing the students to pinch the pots using their sense of touch in a guided practice approach will work.  I did this believe or not with HS kids. I did do some preliminary work on my own. I turned out the lights and memorized the room. Then during the class I could walk between and around without them knowing where I was when I wasn't talking. I also pulled some shenanigans at times where they would really be confused-climbing on top of a table so I was in the middle up high-then giving their next set of instructions.  Funny thing is, they were so amused by the crazy teacher and the complete isolation and concentration on the process that they didn't think of mischief. It was a good lesson, and I even did it as an inservice one time with a bunch of teachers and administrators.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

You give "Crazy, Old Art Teachers" a good name Pres.

 

I used to do pinch pots, with my high school students at a previous school.  But that's when I had a Ceramics I and II.  Now, I just have the one class, so I've dropped the project, for the sake of time, and doing more in-depth projects.  I still go over the "pinch" process, there just isn't a project that focuses on it specifically.

 

You can't beat glaze test tiles.  I had never made a tile board, when I started my first teaching job.  The previous instructor had some tiles, but just in a small container, and they were pretty beat up.  So I remade all new tiles, with some student help, and had a nice little board.  My second job the instructor had the tiles, well taken care of.

At my current job, there were NO tiles at all.  I once again made all of them, and created the board.

 

The boards that I made, are a little different than yours Pres.  I don't screw my tiles down.  They just slide on a nail, so they can be removed, and held near projects, to figure out schemes.  I also, etch a number that corresponds to the glaze onto the tile.  This also serves as an area, where the glaze collects, to show what happens, in that instance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

I screwed mine down to the board so that there was always an excellent example easily found. We also had heavy string bound test tiles of our glazes, but then you never could find them when wanting to make a quick point. We would paint the name of the glaze on back of tile in unglazed area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chantay    101

Come January I will have been working with clay just two years.  I think every failure is a rung on the ladder toward success.  My 14 year old daughter said something to me this evening.  She was practicing her violin.  I complemented her on her improvement.  Her response was, "Mom, when I see how much better you have gotten with throwing clay it makes me realize that I can be as good as I want if I'm just willing to keep at it."  Brought tears to my eyes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×