Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Mudslinger Ceramics

What Do You Do With Your Pottery 'seconds'?

Recommended Posts

Hi all

 

Wondering what other potters do with their product 'seconds?

 

I have smashed the pitiable ones,

I have given many away to friends until eyes glaze and smiles freeze at another pot

I have damaged the maker's mark and sold them cheaply at school fetes and carpark markets well away from my gallery and high end outlets

but....after 12 years I'm running out of ideas.

 

I don't mean the really horrible 'seconds' which deserve a new life as mosaic .....but those with a small fault that are still functional but not 'good enough' for the regular outlets where high quality and reputation are essential to good business.

 

Talking faults like.......small 'S' crack under the foot ring, pin hole that won't heal in refire, post fire warp, glaze not the 'right' colour, pre-loved experiments....etc

 

What do you do with your pottery 'seconds'?

 

regards,

Irene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Biglou13    202

Irene,

 

I am planning on to use the technique of a crossed out chop mark for seconds.( Dremel tool) Leaving firsts with "whole" chop mark. (If can ever make a mark that I like)

 

But ultimately too many of these seconds in a market will dilute your body of work

 

It's often said "you are only as good as your last worst piece"

 

As an artist it's important to learn to edit. Which as potters can be difficult because if the work process.

 

Take a photographer for instance he may shoot 1000 frames for a 5 picture story.

 

I'm not saying you need to crash 99.5 % of your work.

 

But I've heard of amazing high percentages of edits of tea bowls makers

 

Potters tend to be frugal, and are bound by some rule of conservation......it also it is bond with material possessions

 

Freeing your self of these bonds may free you up spiritually and creatively

 

 

But since your asking it sounds like your having issues letting go of these pieces.

 

If your pottery sculpture garden is full try giving the pieces to a charitable organization, here your work continues giving!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,087

I got this from another potter ... if you have a yard, start building a wall with them ... or a rock garden .... or just put them outside in your existing plantings. Amazing how they start looking better in a few years as they age and have things live in or grow on them. If you do smash them use the shards as mulch in areas where you want to discourage squirrels ... they will not walk across sharp stuff to get at your flowers and seeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trina    20

I hammer the majority, but the ones i can't part with get the garden. I never ever ever sell seconds.... EVER. T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

I've got a few sitting around my house and in my classroom, that turned out "well enough".  The others that have no redeeming qualities, either don't make it to the bisque firing and end up reclaimed, and those that do meet with a lot of sudden force, that changes their structural makeup. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JBaymore    1,432

I don't mean the really horrible 'seconds' which deserve a new life as mosaic .....but those with a small fault that are still functional but not 'good enough' for the regular outlets where high quality and reputation are essential to good business.

 

Talking faults like.......small 'S' crack under the foot ring, pin hole that won't heal in refire, post fire warp, glaze not the 'right' colour, pre-loved experiments....etc

 

To the shard pit with em'. 

 

IMO....... selling seconds can de-value your other work....and once the piece is out of your hands...... it is representing you out in the world.  You sell it to someone as a second... and they then give it as a wedding gift to someone....... and you can BET they will not mention it is a "second" in that context.

 

Potential long term loss for short term gain.

 

Price the firsts to make up for the seconds, thirds and so on.  And work get your process controlled so that the percentage of less than firsts is very low.

 

best,

 

.............john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jrgpots    231

Hammer them, ball mill them, add the powder to resin and make a garden walk. The longer the walk, the longer you've been in business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22
To the shard pit with em'. 

 

IMO....... selling seconds can de-value your other work....and once the piece is out of your hands...... it is representing you out in the world.  You sell it to someone as a second... and they then give it as a wedding gift to someone....... and you can BET they will not mention it is a "second" in that context.

 

Potential long term loss for short term gain.

 

Price the firsts to make up for the seconds, thirds and so on.  And work get your process controlled so that the percentage of less than firsts is very low.

 

best,

 

.............john

 

 

Just to test this general 'smash'm' notion a bit....

 

I make raku plates with etched designs. These are pretty finicky- all stages included, it takes about 2 hours to generate one of these. Failure rates in the raku firing run about one in three or four.

 

Given that these pieces are inherently decorative (no functional use possible), and that 'cracking' is sort of inate to the asethetics of raku... what would people think about carefully mending and selling one of these?

 

8569863_orig.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

Being as they aren't functional, I don't see why this would be  a problem.  It's not like it's a piece of dinner/ serving ware, where it will be heated and cooled, causing it to rebreak.  It also won't be used with food, potentially making someone sick.

If you can mend the piece, without it being noticeable, I don't see an issue.  You could always drop the price on that one a bit.

 

On a side note, I really like those plates.  Great colors, great design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

Being as they aren't functional, I don't see why this would be  a problem.  It's not like it's a piece of dinner/ serving ware, where it will be heated and cooled, causing it to rebreak.  It also won't be used with food, potentially making someone sick.

If you can mend the piece, without it being noticeable, I don't see an issue.  You could always drop the price on that one a bit.

 

On a side note, I really like those plates.  Great colors, great design.

 

Thanks- very kind of you. I was happy with how this one turned out... especially in light of the colors of the fish it was based on (Ling Cod- see below). While I agree in general that one shouldn't get over-attached to ones work, raku is so fickle that I really really hate to smash this one....

 

lingcod0.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

Told this story before, somewhere here. Put over one hundred of my unwanted pots on my back porch open to an alley. These were from grad classes at Penn State summers-I kept the keepers. By the following Spring the porch was empty. Occasionally, I'll walk into someones home and see a pot on a mantle, in a corner, on a coffee table. Pick it up and find the signature. Never said a word. I don't think most people connect me with then. Some of them actually point it out that they bought it somewhere etc. Most of these were Raku or ^9 stoneware. Never sold any from that time in life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    610

Told this story before, somewhere here. Put over one hundred of my unwanted pots on my back porch open to an alley. These were from grad classes at Penn State summers-I kept the keepers. By the following Spring the porch was empty. Occasionally, I'll walk into someones home and see a pot on a mantle, in a corner, on a coffee table. Pick it up and find the signature. Never said a word. I don't think most people connect me with then. Some of them actually point it out that they bought it somewhere etc. Most of these were Raku or ^9 stoneware. Never sold any from that time in life.

Was your intention for  them to disappear?  Or is it just something that gradually happened on its own?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
potziller    0

Hi Irene,

Mozaics perhaps? Re-tile the bathroom/kitchen splash back?  Give 'em to the other type of potter; those folk who plant up in pots - they'll know what to de with 'em!  Grind them up for grog and other intersting inclusion experiement?  Hope I haven't added to your headache!

V:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
potziller    0

 

To the shard pit with em'. 

 

IMO....... selling seconds can de-value your other work....and once the piece is out of your hands...... it is representing you out in the world.  You sell it to someone as a second... and they then give it as a wedding gift to someone....... and you can BET they will not mention it is a "second" in that context.

 

Potential long term loss for short term gain.

 

Price the firsts to make up for the seconds, thirds and so on.  And work get your process controlled so that the percentage of less than firsts is very low.

 

best,

 

.............john

 

 

Just to test this general 'smash'm' notion a bit....

 

I make raku plates with etched designs. These are pretty finicky- all stages included, it takes about 2 hours to generate one of these. Failure rates in the raku firing run about one in three or four.

 

Given that these pieces are inherently decorative (no functional use possible), and that 'cracking' is sort of inate to the asethetics of raku... what would people think about carefully mending and selling one of these?

 

8569863_orig.jpg

  • Makienaoshi (maki-e).
  • Yobitsogi.
  • Kintsugi.
  • Gintsugi.
  • Google..............

Now, if memory serves....................Kintsugi  translates to something like 'Golden Joinery' (if Wiki is to be believed).  There's an example in my local museum and interestingly enough, it's a bowl with two fish on it!  I have a pic of it, but I haven't sussed how to get images into this comment forum yet (any hints would be great!). 

Or you could do as my tutor always suggests, "let it go and make another"  Making another pot is always good!

V:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris Campbell    1,087

The new instant glues are very improved and work very well on ceramics. Just check the labels for usages. You follow the directions and I think you only have to hold them together for a minute. Key is not to use too much glue.

Then glue a permanent backing of some kind for support and so no one tries to use it for anything else. For this job i have used both epoxy and silicone. i like the clear silicone because it is flexible. Glue your hanging hardware on and you are good to go.

I have also framed the two pieces leaving the crack showing in the middle ... looked very cool and sold quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pres    896

 

Told this story before, somewhere here. Put over one hundred of my unwanted pots on my back porch open to an alley. These were from grad classes at Penn State summers-I kept the keepers. By the following Spring the porch was empty. Occasionally, I'll walk into someones home and see a pot on a mantle, in a corner, on a coffee table. Pick it up and find the signature. Never said a word. I don't think most people connect me with then. Some of them actually point it out that they bought it somewhere etc. Most of these were Raku or ^9 stoneware. Never sold any from that time in life.

Was your intention for  them to disappear?  Or is it just something that gradually happened on its own?

 

My intention was to get them out of the 3 room house-they were ringing like crazy every night keeping us awake.  These days nothing makes it to bisque if it isn't up to snuff, and if it does, it never makes it to glaze. For those that crack in glaze firing, trash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark C.    1,800

 

Thanks- very kind of you. I was happy with how this one turned out... especially in light of the colors of the fish it was based on (Ling Cod- see below). While I agree in general that one shouldn't get over-attached to ones work, raku is so fickle that I really really hate to smash this one....

 

lingcod0.JPG

 

Hey there-this underwater looks like it was taken off Montery-do you have any onfo on that?? You can tell its off Cal-coast by the hydro corals which have a narrow range.

mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

 

Hey there-this underwater looks like it was taken off Montery-do you have any onfo on that?? You can tell its off Cal-coast by the hydro corals which have a narrow range.

 

mark

 

 

Mark...

 

The photo is from a marine photographer named Kawika Chetron. Northern California- near Eureka. Really sad story- Kawika disapeared on a dive a few years back.

 

I'm currently working towards getting into cold water diving. All my dives have been in Hawaii and Borneo and places like that... yet I'm an avid B.C. sea kayaker with a father on the Olympic Peninsula. Everything I've heard suggests that the diving in those areas is incredible...

 

Edit... Carmel Bay... not Eureka...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark C.    1,800

(The photo is from a marine photographer named Kawika Chetron. Northern California- near Eureka. Really sad story- Kawika disapeared on a dive a few years back.)

 

I know the story well as I cleaned his boat after his death  before his parents  took it away .My diver friend did the dive looking for him at his anchored boat off a coast guard cutter when they found the boat.My dive friends told him not to go alone to that spot. I live and dive where this all took place near Eureka and have been cold water diving since a boy.

I reconized the place of the ling as I have shot many a roll underwater in Carmel Bay off my boat.

small world you know.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

(The photo is from a marine photographer named Kawika Chetron. Northern California- near Eureka. Really sad story- Kawika disapeared on a dive a few years back.)

 

I know the story well as I cleaned his boat after his death  before his parents  took it away .My diver friend did the dive looking for him at his anchored boat off a coast guard cutter when they found the boat.My dive friends told him not to go alone to that spot. I live and dive where this all took place near Eureka and have been cold water diving since a boy.

I reconized the place of the ling as I have shot many a roll underwater in Carmel Bay off my boat.

small world you know.

Mark

 

Yeah no kidding- small world. I'd definitely love to dive that area once I've completed the plunge into dry suit work.

 

Anyhow, I'm a long time admirer of the guy's photography (I've never seen better photos of harbor seals, among other things), and was really shaken to hear about his loss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark C.    1,800

Dry suit is a must have  to be comfortable-I own several.

Idaho is a ways from the sea. I do art show in Anacortes Wa. 1st weekend in August then dive Keystone underwater park for a few days afterward taking underwater photos. Been doing this there for over 20 years now. Its a good mix- clay and dive.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×