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Splotchy colour in stained glaze


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#1 Min

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 01:31 PM

I’m working on a clear glaze with stain that breaks and pools. If I spray the test pots they look okay but is there a way to get an even glaze with dipping? With dipping trials the glaze seems to go on the pot okay, no drips or runs and it looks even when raw but splotchy when fired. I'm using 2% stain in a low expansion clear, ^6 1/2, smooth white clay.

Thanks in advance for any help, Min

#2 John255

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 05:05 PM

I’m working on a clear glaze with stain that breaks and pools. If I spray the test pots they look okay but is there a way to get an even glaze with dipping? With dipping trials the glaze seems to go on the pot okay, no drips or runs and it looks even when raw but splotchy when fired. I'm using 2% stain in a low expansion clear, ^6 1/2, smooth white clay.

Thanks in advance for any help, Min


Min,
The problem with a "splotch" is it can look much like a "blotch" at the right time of day, especially if you are not feeling well.
You really need a photo get more accurate speculation about this defect.
Good luck.
John255
John255

#3 Min

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 07:16 PM

[
I’m working on a clear glaze with stain that breaks and pools. If I spray the test pots they look okay but is there a way to get an even glaze with dipping? With dipping trials the glaze seems to go on the pot okay, no drips or runs and it looks even when raw but splotchy when fired. I'm using 2% stain in a low expansion clear, ^6 1/2, smooth white clay.

Thanks in advance for any help, Min
[/quote]

Min,
The problem with a "splotch" is it can look much like a "blotch" at the right time of day, especially if you are not feeling well.
You really need a photo get more accurate speculation about this defect.
Good luck.
John255
[/quote]

You are right, I should have attached a photo in the first place. The gray glaze on the test piece isn't too bad but the green really shows the colour uneveness. Min

[attachment=2571:DSC_0140-1200-b.jpg]







#4 oldlady

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 09:56 PM

i don't see anything wrong. the glazes pool in low places and show up darker. maybe if you see something i don't.   you could circle the offending splotch, blotch with a sharpie so it can be seen more easily. these pieces look great to me, the pooling of color is just right in the impressions.


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#5 Min

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 11:18 PM

i don't see anything wrong. the glazes pool in low places and show up darker. maybe if you see something i don't you could circle the offending splotch, blotch with a sharpie so it can be seen more easily. these pieces look great to me, the pooling of color is just right in the impressions.



Thanks for looking at my tests "Old Lady", better picture posted now. Min

#6 OffCenter

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:11 AM

You are right, I should have attached a photo in the first place. The gray glaze on the test piece isn't too bad but the green really shows the colour uneveness. Min

[attachment=2571:DSC_0140-1200-b.jpg]



I wouldn't call that splotchy. I'd call it nice. Granted you can see it better than those of us looking at the pictures, but the gray glaze looks just as "splotchy" to me as the green. I'd be complaining if the glaze was just a bland, even, commercial-looking glaze instead of a the glaze you have with subtle variations of color depending on thickness.

The difference in your sprayed tests and your dipped pots is that spraying results (when done carefully) in a very even layer of glaze that is not affected much by indents in the surface (during application), whereas with dipping the glaze tends to be thicker and pools in low spots and thins off in high spots. So, naturally, you're going to get a lot more unevenness with dipping--which, I think in this case is better.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#7 Brooke•Millecchia

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 02:54 PM

The glaze is doing it's job in all of the right places. They look nice!





#8 Mark C.

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 04:56 PM

The pots look fine-its ceramic glaze not automotive paint . The effects you mention are part of the ceramic process-its best to be happy with that.
Mark
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#9 Min

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 06:08 PM

Thanks for the replies, guess I was being nitpicky. Min

#10 flowerdry

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:37 PM

Those glazes are gorgeous. Isn't it interesting that we are all admiring the "fault" you are trying to get rid of....

Doris Hackworth

"Promoting the joy of handmade pottery"





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