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Throwing on bats


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#1 jemenfous5

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:10 PM

I got a bunch of old bats for free but I haven't been able to get anything centered on them. I can center easily directly on the wheel head, but for some reason I can't ever get it centered on any of the bats. Is it the bats or am I now using them correctly? some of them are half inch thick cork-like material and the other is a thinner masonite-type one. I used the brand new plasti-bat that came with my wheel once with no problem, but now I can't get anything centered on that either. Maybe they're all slightly warped?

#2 mregecko

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:39 PM

Is there any wiggle in the pegs? I have some bats that will "rattle" a little bit on their bat pins, and if that happens I CANNOT center for the life of me.

If there is, put a piece of paper or some clay in the pin-hole and it might help remedy the wobble.

#3 Benzine

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 07:48 PM

What's a good way to attach a bat sans pins? I was going to buy some drilled bats, because my classroom does have a couple wheels, that accept bat pins, but if I can find another way, that's fairly quick and easy, I can just do that.

I've always just used bats, or thrown directly on the wheel head. But using bats, would allow my students the opportunity to produce more.

The general consensus, I've seen, seems to suggest using a flattened "pad" of clay, with concentric lines or grooves in it.
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#4 Meg

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 09:49 PM

The bats may be warped, but is it possible that your wheelhead is not level?

#5 neilestrick

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 09:13 AM

To attach a bat without using pins, throw a thin disc of clay to cover the wheel head, very level, about 1/4-1/2 inch thick. Put a few concentric circles in it with you finger. Wipe it down with water, then put your bat on it. Tap down the bat a couple of times and it'll stick. When done just pry off the bat and keep using the disc. This works best with wood bats. Plastic tends to slip.
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#6 Diane Puckett

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 09:32 AM

I have a Bat-Gripper, and it does help. It is basically a sheet of thin rubber which you wet and lay on the wheel head. It does not solve everything but is generally helpful. It is about ten dollars.
I have had wobbly bats because -
- the holes on Masonite bats had gotten too large
- the holes on plastic bats were too tight for my bat pins, so the bats would not sit flat
- the holes on plastic bats were too large
- bat pins got old and smaller. I was told this could happen, but I am still not sure.

If bats are not level and tight, centering is impossible. I find laying a couple strips of wet newsprint over bat pins is a better anchor for loose bats.
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#7 Pres

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 09:55 AM

To attach a bat without using pins, throw a thin disc of clay to cover the wheel head, very level, about 1/4-1/2 inch thick. Put a few concentric circles in it with you finger. Wipe it down with water, then put your bat on it. Tap down the bat a couple of times and it'll stick. When done just pry off the bat and keep using the disc. This works best with wood bats. Plastic tends to slip.


I used to use this tick years ago, and it worked very well, and you could use it in multiples if you did a little bit of work after removing the previous bat. Later I started using bat pins with plywood bats, even cut some bats using a compass fitting for my zip saw using some old 3/8 inch marine plywood. They are some what warped, but will do. Most times I use Bailey's when throwing large plates where a level unwarped bat is really important.

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#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 05:31 PM

I use to use this system too. I usually throw a thin plate and put the grooves in. Then place the bat on top and whack it. This system works well, but I do like the pins now that I converted to them.

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#9 Benzine

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 07:45 PM

The disk method would work well for me, but I think I may opt for pins, for my students, who have never worked on the wheel before. It would take precious time, just to teach them how to create the disk properly.
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#10 Pres

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 07:30 AM

The disk method would work well for me, but I think I may opt for pins, for my students, who have never worked on the wheel before. It would take precious time, just to teach them how to create the disk properly.


Pins save a lot of time, but you may want to demonstrate the disc method at least.

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#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 07:48 AM

The pins would also save a lot of clay in a classroom situation.

Marcia

#12 neilestrick

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 10:15 AM

The clay disc can be used over and over, and you can cover it with plastic between uses to keep it fresh. Pins are a little less trouble, but I used the clay disc method for a couple of years and it's really not any slower once you get used to it. But for students pins would be preferred.
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#13 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 05:52 PM

I use the clay disc method but it makes it extra important to be sure the bat is applied level. Rather than using 1 fist to pound the bat down- I use two on opposite sides of the bat. I don't have pins and have never used them. I don't even know how to use them if I had them.

My most common mistake as a potter is throwing something too big and failing to use a bat. I have to wait a few hrs for it to get stiff enough to remove without collapsing the bowl. I don't always start off a project knowing what I am going to make.. I just go with the flow of the clay.
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#14 Jo-Ann

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 08:02 AM

If the pins are loose you can stuff the holes with some clay to get a more snug fit. I made a bat pad that works well with wiggly pins, I used the rubbery stuff you tuck under carpeting to keep them from slipping or you can use the non slip stuff meant to line kitchen cupboards with, I think you can find it at the dollar store even. What I have found to be the best, most snug solution is as mentioned above, throwing a pad of clay to stick your bat too.

#15 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 08:19 AM

I use one of those rubbery grab bats under my bats . If the holes are worn, it keeps the bats from slipping.

Marcia

#16 AtomicAxe

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 08:23 AM

if using pins and it rattles (thus making it next to impossible to center properly as it's shifting) ... clay in the peg holes can help ... but I just put 4 little dots of clay on the head and whack down ... that way it's glued to the wheel head like the clay disk ... but isn't trying to jam a loose hole with squishy clay. Best of both worlds.

As for without pins, clay pad with grooves and a whack like others have mentioned.

My suggestion for bats is always to make your own ... if they were given to you ... most likely you will spend a ton of time getting them to not eff up. One thing I want to do is this ... http://www.axner.com...ompleteset.aspx ... i used to make my own plaster bats the hard way, but darned if I don't miss them. Oh and some good thick 3/8" masonite bats go a long way, made mine as squares that corner to corner matched my wheel head when I was throwing smaller things.

#17 Pres

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 08:46 AM

if using pins and it rattles (thus making it next to impossible to center properly as it's shifting) ... clay in the peg holes can help ... but I just put 4 little dots of clay on the head and whack down ... that way it's glued to the wheel head like the clay disk ... but isn't trying to jam a loose hole with squishy clay. Best of both worlds.

As for without pins, clay pad with grooves and a whack like others have mentioned.

My suggestion for bats is always to make your own ... if they were given to you ... most likely you will spend a ton of time getting them to not eff up. One thing I want to do is this ... http://www.axner.com...ompleteset.aspx ... i used to make my own plaster bats the hard way, but darned if I don't miss them. Oh and some good thick 3/8" masonite bats go a long way, made mine as squares that corner to corner matched my wheel head when I was throwing smaller things.


I had bats with worn pin holes that I repaired, they now work better than some new ones. You go to a hardware store and find plastic tubing or pipe that fits your pins. Drill out your old holes to fit the new OD of the tubing, insert tubing with a little epoxy, cut off, and sand even. the tubing wears very well, has a little cushioning, and really does a nice job.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#18 AtomicAxe

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 09:41 PM

I had bats with worn pin holes that I repaired, they now work better than some new ones. You go to a hardware store and find plastic tubing or pipe that fits your pins. Drill out your old holes to fit the new OD of the tubing, insert tubing with a little epoxy, cut off, and sand even. the tubing wears very well, has a little cushioning, and really does a nice job.


Awesome Idea. plus since it's equal pressure all the way around ... it's going to be stronger than a normal hole. man ... really great idea!

#19 yedrow

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 10:08 PM

It's probably easier to just get new socket head screws than it is to replace a bat hole. In fact, you only need one good hole.

As to the original question, centering can be very psychological. If your bat is rattling then you need new bat pins (socket head screws). If it is warped it will 'lope' on you as it spins. If it soundly on the wheel head then it is more likely that you changed something in your centering than it is that the bat is causing a problem.


Joel.

#20 Pres

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:01 AM

It's probably easier to just get new socket head screws than it is to replace a bat hole. In fact, you only need one good hole.

As to the original question, centering can be very psychological. If your bat is rattling then you need new bat pins (socket head screws). If it is warped it will 'lope' on you as it spins. If it soundly on the wheel head then it is more likely that you changed something in your centering than it is that the bat is causing a problem.


Joel.


I tried it with the larger head screws, but was not satisfied.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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