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For those who sell in galleries how does that go for you? Asking because recently I was asked to put  work in a gallery, nothing specific just whatever I felt with a limit of 9 items. I'm not really sure to go about this as I know the small items like... mugs tend to move faster. In my head I cant truly imagine 9 lonely mugs on a shelf going in a gallery.

Is this typically do for gallery setting? First time doing anything like this so any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Whatever it takes, right?

 

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Do you live close enough to go visit the gallery in person? That’s the best way to get a good idea of what you should include in your 9 items, and how you can expect them to display your work. 

If you can’t visit in person, hopefully the gallery has a decent website that will give you similar answers. 

If they are letting you choose the 9 items, it sounds like this is a consignment situation, rather than wholesale? You can search this section of the forum to find lots of warnings about doing consignment. It doesn’t mean you can’t do it, just be aware of the pitfalls and stay on top of everything. 

Anyhow, congrats on the new opportunity! I hope it works out for you, and leads to even better things. 

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7 hours ago, GEP said:

Do you live close enough to go visit the gallery in person? That’s the best way to get a good idea of what you should include in your 9 items, and how you can expect them to display your work. 

If you can’t visit in person, hopefully the gallery has a decent website that will give you similar answers. 

If they are letting you choose the 9 items, it sounds like this is a consignment situation, rather than wholesale? You can search this section of the forum to find lots of warnings about doing consignment. It doesn’t mean you can’t do it, just be aware of the pitfalls and stay on top of everything. 

Anyhow, congrats on the new opportunity! I hope it works out for you, and leads to even better things. 

Thank you and thanks for mentioning consignment. I received a contract today and sure enough it is. 

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My advice on consignment is more very slowly and 1st get to know the people and location . I have two consignment shops left in business.I have been with them for many many decades .

This is one of those situations you need a contract with and watch carefully (stay on top of) .It can go south in minute .

I know my people very well-they are very honest and good business folks. This is important-that process the monthly paperwork well and on time.

I get asked about consignment a lot by new business owners and would never be involved unless I had references  from others or knew someone who deals with them and even then I would check it all out very thoroughly myself. I have said NO way more times than yes-especially these days.

On the other hand 9 items is a small potatoes deal . If it went south you loose 9 items-can you afford that?

I have never heard of that low number of items before unless its a fancy gallery and the space is limited. In that kind of space it would not be mugs but one of a kind work.

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Is it maybe a Co-op gallery? Maybe not, but just in case be warned they can be weird.  I've been a member of three Co-ops and they are a mixed bag. Be sure you can work with the people in charge, recently I bailed and forfeited two of my paintings to get out of a contract with one due to personality conflicts. Long story. The two prior to that were much more above board and reliable, but I wouldn't call sales brisk. Sitting two days a week and working the till was something I hated and I never sold a thing (but someone who copied Dali paintings was making $1200 a painting weekly, go figure. Well that's the art world.) When I'd spent the money I allotted on monthly memberships I quit when my contract ran out. 

 

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48 minutes ago, Mark C. said:

My advice on consignment is more very slowly and 1st get to know the people and location . I have two consignment shops left in business.I have been with them for many many decades .

This is one of those situations you need a contract with and watch carefully (stay on top of) .It can go south in minute .

I know my people very well-they are very honest and good business folks. This is important-that process the monthly paperwork well and on time.

I get asked about consignment a lot by new business owners and would never be involved unless I had references  from others or knew someone who deals with them and even then I would check it all out very thoroughly myself. I have said NO way more times than yes-especially these days.

On the other hand 9 items is a small potatoes deal . If it went south you loose 9 items-can you afford that?

I have never heard of that low number of items before unless its a fancy gallery and the space is limited. In that kind of space it would not be mugs but one of a kind work.

Thank you. I do know these people somewhat and so far, they seem like people with good enough intentions. I should have been more specific it's a coffee shop setting with an attached gallery. Now I'm sure its probably a no brainer they will be spending way more time and energy pushing their coffee shop than pushing art works. So I am prepared if the items don't get anywhere or for some reason get them back. I'm still not sure where to go with this. Maybe just like a sampler of items? Perhaps 1 or 2 special items and the rest smaller stuff?

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1 hour ago, Mark C. said:

Whats the agreement 50/50 ?Details would help.

Its 80/20. A very small profit on their part I think. Fairly new businesses (under a year) I've had a little apprehension since they are so new but thought well what could it hurt. 

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I have had good and some not so good experiences with consignment.  I am one that will take a chance if I have a good feeling about it,  if something feels off I walk away.  As Mea said, if it's close check it out in person, go have a cup of coffee.  If it feels like it you could see your mugs there, try to make contact while your there to at least introduce yourself.  As Mark stated, its 9 cups.  Is that an acceptable risk for you?  If not, adjust the initial delivery to a number you feel comfortable with and set a contract specifying minimally the length of the trial period, frequency of pay and the percentage, reorder procedure,  and an escape clause.  It will protect both of you.

Best of luck

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6 hours ago, BlackDogPottery said:

Its 80/20. A very small profit on their part I think. Fairly new businesses (under a year) I've had a little apprehension since they are so new but thought well what could it hurt. 

80/20 is extremely favorable! You won’t find a better split than that. In fact, it’s so favorable tht it does raise a question mark. Are the owners good business people? There is the possibility that they plan to make all their revenue on coffee, and the handmade crafts are just for ambience. So it looks like it’s worth a try. It sounds like you have the right expectations going in. 

Because it’s a coffee shop, I would focus on mugs. Maybe 7 mugs, plus 2 other pots that are also coffee related, like sugar jars. 

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I’m with Mea on this ... 80/20 suggests people who either do not know what they are doing or they just want to act out the role of getting things locally.

I would almost guarantee they won’t be selling your work so it will have to sell itself.  Mugs is what I would supply ... espresso size, latte size and large size.

Good luck with it!

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go ahead but remember that the work you put in their shop is still yours.  at the first sign of possible financial trouble with the business, take your things out.  otherwise, if the business fails, the work will be considered inventory and sold at auction with the rest of the contents of the shop.  you lose.

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In consignment often the business owners do strange things with your pots. Some of these that I have seen is they use them to display other products-I once had my bowls full of key chains for sale (my bowl would not sell like this)

I have seen small stuff animals in my pots as well. All this took education go owners.Also pots where put in window box where customer could not touch them (kiss of death for sales)

More owner education.

Just get it straight at beginning -sell as few mugs and see what happens.

I have never heard of 80/20 split but that only means as other have said they are new to all this.

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