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Plates - Slump & Hump


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#21 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 08:17 AM

My thrown plates don't warp. I dry mine as Neil says, right side up and upside down. On mt last porcelain dinner set, I put 2 concentric feet on the bottom.
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#22 Pugaboo

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 09:25 AM

There are a few ways to create plates without the wheel that I use.

1) If you want a quick simple disposable form to create a plate use Chinet plates. I use this method for teaching classes and even novice Potters can make plates that don't warp. Basically roll out your clay, lay over Chinet plate, use pounce to shape to form, trim, drop on floor to settle the clay, if you want a decorative rim place another Chinet plate on top of this and gently press in around the rim to capture that line. You can also add your own texture like lace, leaves, etc. you can remove the top plate almost instantly or at least the next day. LEAVE on wareboard until firm leather hard then sandwich and flip, pull off Chinet plate from bottom of plate, use shredder to carefully clean up edges. I slide mine off the board and onto wire shelves to dry. I have very little to no warping. The secret is the compressing of the clay into the form and NEVER pick up the plate off the wareboard while working with it. Lifting by the rim will cause your plate to warp, so careful handling on boards is required until it is dry enough to do so safely.

2) Bisque molds. I started out like Marcia using dry clay molds and then when I was completely happy I used that to create 8 bisque molds by rolling out a slightly thicker slab and forming, then just bisque firing them. You can even design right in any textures you want. Once bisque fired I just use these as if they were plaster molds, I in fact think they dry the clay faster than plaster. I like them for my silk screened imagery since I can flip the damp image face down over the mold and it won't smudge the image. I add a simple foot ring using an extrusion. I have not had an issue with Plates warping using this method either. I am still tweaking this to make the whole process faster.p but I'd say I'm am 90% there.

3) use craft foam and push plates. This is a great method for unique shaped plates. I have sets in floral, ornate square, and scalloped shapes that can be used for plates. Basically cut a craft foam ring into the shape you want then roll out clay and cut it the size and shape as the interior edge of your craft foam ring. Dry this between drywall until leather hard, then add little knobs to hold and pull the press plate out when you use it. Bisque fire this press plate. To use lay your ring of craft foam on a cushion, then lay a slab of clay over it, position your press plate in the center of your clay disc that is laying on top of your craft foam circle. Press down into the clay with the push plate and you will get a nice plate with a rim. The cushion cradles the foam and clay and when you push down the craft foam causes the rim of the plate to curve up whistle the push plate presses the bottom flat. Carefully remove from cushion, leave craft foam on the bottom until leather hard and dry on wire racks. This is a little more freeform than the previous 2 methods so there will be some variations but I use this for my floral petal plates and it works really well.

I hope one of these methods might help you get the plates you want.

Terry
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#23 Joseph F

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 03:17 PM

My thrown plates warp most of the time, but I am not very good at throwing them.



#24 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 03:41 PM

pugaboo said 2. Bisque molds. I started out like Marcia using dry clay molds and then when I was completely happy I used that to create 8 bisque molds by rolling out a slightly thicker slab and forming, then just bisque firing them.

I don't use bisque molds . I used plaster molds at first with plywood rings to sandwich the slab. Then I was giving many workshops and flying with plaster was ridiculous. So Now I sandwich the slab, prop up the plywood rings and let the slab drop into a large hump shaped form in the air!

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#25 Pugaboo

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 09:16 PM

Oops sorry Marcia I meant Chris!

I start out using a clay mold that is just dried and then when I am completely happy I make multiple bisque molds so I can make a bunch at once. I often do the dry clay molds for special orders that way once done I can reclaim the clay.

Marcia I like your way too I might have to give it a try for use during classes, might be less likely to get damaged.

Lots of ways to make a plate and now that my wheel is ready to throw standing up I plan to try throwing some as well.

T
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#26 yappystudent

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 10:40 PM

Learn to enjoy the simplicity and functionality of asymmetrical, uneven, yet beautiful ware. You're just going to chip them eventually anyway.


If nothing breaks you're not really trying.


#27 oldlady

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 11:26 PM

oh, yappy, you are bordering on a HUGE difference of opinions.  fortunately, this group of potters and pottery lovers is diverse enough to absorb the shock.  

 

there  are places i cannot go anymore.  the attitude of the owners is that everything is beautiful.  well, yes, that is true.  BUT when someone wants to learn a skill, it should be treated as a journey from no skill to something approaching much better.  not just "well, you can always use it to hold nuts".


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#28 preeta

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Posted 08 March 2017 - 10:05 AM

this semester yappy everyone in my class is surprised  how few of my things are coming out of the kiln. i've been destroying more than firing. because i would only fire perfect ones. (however i have recently been firing some close to perfect forms to do some slip tests)

 

i have to learn how to throw perfect before i even learn the art of the asymmetrical. i am hoping maybe in 10 years i will learn the art well enough that my warp will be beautiful. in teh meantime i am honing my senses by studying elements of design in other art classes too. 


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#29 Joseph F

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 05:31 PM

Well I got my bats yesterday evening. I bought 3 of them. So I can make 3 plates at a time. These were the ones I made today:

 

http://i.imgur.com/nmZ3sv9.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/eKCnH3n.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/r6CoE62.jpg

 

I tried different weights to see the thickness. I think 4 seems to be the magic number. I did 3.5#, 4# and 4.5#. 4.5 was too much clay. 3.5 could probably be the best with some more practice.  Not sure I like this design until I test it though.

 

I think I might end up trimming feet on two of them, the 4 and 4.5 pound ones are probably too thick. I am not sure how much clay one should use to throw a plate tbh. But I plan on trying different weights each time I can remove these.

 

The good news is they will be great to test glaze designs on. 



#30 preeta

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 06:51 PM

Joseph I dont remember what cone you fire at? ^6? 

 

and what clay are you using?


"Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go." T.S. Eliot


#31 oldlady

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 07:45 PM

well, i made an awful mistake with your first photo. did not go the your post to see the next one, i just clicked on next.  what a mistake that was.

 

your plates will be wonderful once you complete them.  you will have learned a lot.  they are very nicely flat right now. good job.


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#32 Joseph F

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 07:48 PM

Joseph I dont remember what cone you fire at? ^6? 

 

and what clay are you using?

 

Cone 6 with a long controlled cooldown, and highwater brownstone.  https://www.highwate...40&ParentCat=35



#33 Joseph F

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 07:50 PM

well, i made an awful mistake with your first photo. did not go the your post to see the next one, i just clicked on next.  what a mistake that was.

 

your plates will be wonderful once you complete them.  you will have learned a lot.  they are very nicely flat right now. good job.

 

I am not sure how you got a next button, I linked the direct image to avoid that. Sorry you had to see something crazy, public image hosting is so meh. I should have just hosted it on my website, but I didn't think about it.

 

Thanks about the plate comments. As soon as these are dry and remove themselves from the bats I am going to try to make a different style plate.  I figured it best to make a bunch of different styles then glaze and fire them all and decide which I want to make a set of 16. 



#34 Min

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 08:21 PM

Hi Joseph, wondering how the rims will fare with a bunch of those stacked on top of each other or would the foot raise the next plate up above the rim? Would you be sticking your thumb into the food picking them up? Lovely and flat looking, that brown clay looks like milk chocolate yumminess  :) Glad you like your new batts.



#35 Joseph F

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 08:24 PM

I am not sure to be honest. In this picture: http://i.imgur.com/eKCnH3n.jpg you can see I tried to make sure that I dug in enough so that they could stack, these are prototypes and the very first plates I have made, so I am more interesting in thickness and weight and clay amounts then the stacking part. I figure that part will be easy to fix if I go with a straight side rim, I will just trim an indent on the bottom so that they stack. But it is a good thought to bring up, I will have to figure out how to make them stack well once I decide this is what I am going to make a set of for personal use.

 

I am not sure I will end up going with this style of plate. I don't think Tiara(my wife) liked them anyways. But she said she can never tell until I glaze it.

 

I have a really hard time liking plates with the inch or so of flat wasted space on the edge. I never understood why someone wants a 10 inch plate with 2 inches being useless. 



#36 Min

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 08:33 PM

Yea, I know what you mean about rims and wasted space. I think however it does frame what is on the plate and makes picking up a loaded plate easier. That being said, the last ones I made the customer wanted a shallow bowl as a plate. I made extra for us, they do work well but I think the style of plate needs to suit the type of foods you mainly would serve on it. We are definitely not a meat n'potatoes kinda family that would need a flat area on the plate to cut meat up on so for us the bowl/plate is working really well. 

(bisque pic)

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#37 Joseph F

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 08:37 PM

Yea that is a beautiful design. I was thinking about that type of design tomorrow. I plan on making 3 plates a day every day(or as soon as they come loose from the bats) until I figure out what I like best. I have always ate on plates with the wasted space on the side. 

 

I didn't think about picking up a loaded plate. I see what your saying now! I will need to trim in or when I am making it cut in enough room so that you can put your finger in the stacking part so you can pick up the plate after you have added food to it! I totally didn't think about that part enough. I guess this is why people put feet on plates. I either will need to flare those rims out more horizontally or make a big enough undercut so that you can stick a finger in there.. Hmmmm.

 

How much clay are you using for that bowl/plate, which btw is gorgeous, do you have any glazed pictures?



#38 Min

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 10:01 PM

Customer wanted the blu/blk combo, ours are just white. The scrap of paper with the weights/measurements is buried in my workshop somewhere, think it was 3lb12 I used for the dinner size. There is a foot, a lot of weight was trimmed away.

ps - I'm sure you have already thought of it but just in case, maybe measure the space in your dishwasher rack where you put plates plus your cupboard depth.

 

 

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#39 Saki

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 10:13 PM

Hi, I have a related question. I can see how throwing round plates is faster and easier than slab building. But if I want to make a large, rectangular or oblong platter (e.g., a 9" x 21" fish platter), would it be easier to do that using a hump mold or a slump mold? My initial guess is that a hump mold might be easier because you can let it dry on the mold and gravity will help the curved sides keep their shape. However, I've never used either a slump or a hump mold before, so I might be missing something.



#40 Roberta12

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Posted 10 March 2017 - 11:02 PM

Joseph, I do like your plates.  They looked just like your original photo!  But Min had some good points about usability.  Min, I also like the set you made for the customer.  I threw some that are similar.  I think my rim is a bit taller.  After I threw them, I was thinking about stackablity.  Once fired I will check that out. 

We have been using some square plates I made before Christmas.  They are holding up well, but could use more of a rim, and here is Min's point about the cupboard.....if you are going to have square plates, they allllll need to be square in order to fit in the space for plates!  Since I only have two square ones, we just stack them on top of the rounds.....Always something to learn!!

 

Roberta






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