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oh, yappy, you are bordering on a HUGE difference of opinions.  fortunately, this group of potters and pottery lovers is diverse enough to absorb the shock.  

 

there  are places i cannot go anymore.  the attitude of the owners is that everything is beautiful.  well, yes, that is true.  BUT when someone wants to learn a skill, it should be treated as a journey from no skill to something approaching much better.  not just "well, you can always use it to hold nuts".

Pugaboo, Joseph F, preeta and 1 other like this

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this semester yappy everyone in my class is surprised  how few of my things are coming out of the kiln. i've been destroying more than firing. because i would only fire perfect ones. (however i have recently been firing some close to perfect forms to do some slip tests)

 

i have to learn how to throw perfect before i even learn the art of the asymmetrical. i am hoping maybe in 10 years i will learn the art well enough that my warp will be beautiful. in teh meantime i am honing my senses by studying elements of design in other art classes too. 

RonSa likes this

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Well I got my bats yesterday evening. I bought 3 of them. So I can make 3 plates at a time. These were the ones I made today:

 

http://i.imgur.com/nmZ3sv9.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/eKCnH3n.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/r6CoE62.jpg

 

I tried different weights to see the thickness. I think 4 seems to be the magic number. I did 3.5#, 4# and 4.5#. 4.5 was too much clay. 3.5 could probably be the best with some more practice.  Not sure I like this design until I test it though.

 

I think I might end up trimming feet on two of them, the 4 and 4.5 pound ones are probably too thick. I am not sure how much clay one should use to throw a plate tbh. But I plan on trying different weights each time I can remove these.

 

The good news is they will be great to test glaze designs on. 

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well, i made an awful mistake with your first photo. did not go the your post to see the next one, i just clicked on next.  what a mistake that was.

 

your plates will be wonderful once you complete them.  you will have learned a lot.  they are very nicely flat right now. good job.

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well, i made an awful mistake with your first photo. did not go the your post to see the next one, i just clicked on next.  what a mistake that was.

 

your plates will be wonderful once you complete them.  you will have learned a lot.  they are very nicely flat right now. good job.

 

I am not sure how you got a next button, I linked the direct image to avoid that. Sorry you had to see something crazy, public image hosting is so meh. I should have just hosted it on my website, but I didn't think about it.

 

Thanks about the plate comments. As soon as these are dry and remove themselves from the bats I am going to try to make a different style plate.  I figured it best to make a bunch of different styles then glaze and fire them all and decide which I want to make a set of 16. 

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Hi Joseph, wondering how the rims will fare with a bunch of those stacked on top of each other or would the foot raise the next plate up above the rim? Would you be sticking your thumb into the food picking them up? Lovely and flat looking, that brown clay looks like milk chocolate yumminess  :) Glad you like your new batts.

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I am not sure to be honest. In this picture: http://i.imgur.com/eKCnH3n.jpg you can see I tried to make sure that I dug in enough so that they could stack, these are prototypes and the very first plates I have made, so I am more interesting in thickness and weight and clay amounts then the stacking part. I figure that part will be easy to fix if I go with a straight side rim, I will just trim an indent on the bottom so that they stack. But it is a good thought to bring up, I will have to figure out how to make them stack well once I decide this is what I am going to make a set of for personal use.

 

I am not sure I will end up going with this style of plate. I don't think Tiara(my wife) liked them anyways. But she said she can never tell until I glaze it.

 

I have a really hard time liking plates with the inch or so of flat wasted space on the edge. I never understood why someone wants a 10 inch plate with 2 inches being useless. 

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Yea, I know what you mean about rims and wasted space. I think however it does frame what is on the plate and makes picking up a loaded plate easier. That being said, the last ones I made the customer wanted a shallow bowl as a plate. I made extra for us, they do work well but I think the style of plate needs to suit the type of foods you mainly would serve on it. We are definitely not a meat n'potatoes kinda family that would need a flat area on the plate to cut meat up on so for us the bowl/plate is working really well. 

(bisque pic)

post-747-0-95300200-1489195989_thumb.jpg

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Yea that is a beautiful design. I was thinking about that type of design tomorrow. I plan on making 3 plates a day every day(or as soon as they come loose from the bats) until I figure out what I like best. I have always ate on plates with the wasted space on the side. 

 

I didn't think about picking up a loaded plate. I see what your saying now! I will need to trim in or when I am making it cut in enough room so that you can put your finger in the stacking part so you can pick up the plate after you have added food to it! I totally didn't think about that part enough. I guess this is why people put feet on plates. I either will need to flare those rims out more horizontally or make a big enough undercut so that you can stick a finger in there.. Hmmmm.

 

How much clay are you using for that bowl/plate, which btw is gorgeous, do you have any glazed pictures?

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Customer wanted the blu/blk combo, ours are just white. The scrap of paper with the weights/measurements is buried in my workshop somewhere, think it was 3lb12 I used for the dinner size. There is a foot, a lot of weight was trimmed away.

ps - I'm sure you have already thought of it but just in case, maybe measure the space in your dishwasher rack where you put plates plus your cupboard depth.

 

 

post-747-0-56636900-1489201191_thumb.jpg

Joseph F and S. Dean like this

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Hi, I have a related question. I can see how throwing round plates is faster and easier than slab building. But if I want to make a large, rectangular or oblong platter (e.g., a 9" x 21" fish platter), would it be easier to do that using a hump mold or a slump mold? My initial guess is that a hump mold might be easier because you can let it dry on the mold and gravity will help the curved sides keep their shape. However, I've never used either a slump or a hump mold before, so I might be missing something.

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Joseph, I do like your plates.  They looked just like your original photo!  But Min had some good points about usability.  Min, I also like the set you made for the customer.  I threw some that are similar.  I think my rim is a bit taller.  After I threw them, I was thinking about stackablity.  Once fired I will check that out. 

We have been using some square plates I made before Christmas.  They are holding up well, but could use more of a rim, and here is Min's point about the cupboard.....if you are going to have square plates, they allllll need to be square in order to fit in the space for plates!  Since I only have two square ones, we just stack them on top of the rounds.....Always something to learn!!

 

Roberta

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joseph, your plates remind me of the Arabia plates i saw at Scan many, many years ago.  the stacking was done with precision engineering of rim and foot to allow easy pick-up of stacked plates.  maybe you can see them somewhere online, maybe ebay.  

 

saki, a slump mold will allow you more options than a hump mold.  most things on a hump have to be removed before the shrinkage forces the plate to crack from stress.  so you have to be alert to the condition of the drying plate.   a slump mold can sit around for a long time without causing a problem because the shrinkage is within the confines of the mold.

Joseph F and Saki like this

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I have a really hard time liking plates with the inch or so of flat wasted space on the edge. I never understood why someone wants a 10 inch plate with 2 inches being useless. 

 

My Denby plates are similar to yours, and they are OK to pick up, even when very hot and I have to use bulky oven gloves.  They have a double foot ring, outer edge and and inner ring.

And they stack well too.

 

gallery_59202_704_69634.png

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Just an update. The first of the three plates I made has popped loose form the hydro bat. I tried drying them in different sections in my greenhouse wracks. This was on the bottom with the zipper not zipped. So it got the most airflow around it. I figured I would try drying them differently to see if it made any difference in the hydro bat performance. 

 

The others are still not loose. 

 

http://josephfireborn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/IMG_20170312_213036.jpg

 

I put the greenware on the bathroom counter-top and it didn't rock at all. It also seems to come lose from the hydrobat at the proper time to trim because I was able to smooth and trim the edges on the bottom slightly at nearly the perfect trimming time. Which I thought was impressive. Also the top and the bottom side seemed to be the same wetness, which made me happy. Two big thumbs up for the hydrobats. Thanks for the recommendation.

 

Looking at this plate is daunting though. So much room for beautiful artwork.

 

I just wanted to post this to give an update. The next one will be glazed plates.

LeeU, douglas and GEP like this

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