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Benzine

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  1. Like
    Benzine reacted to Crystal B. in Cracked hands   
    I get that too, I used a glycerin and silicone based hand cream but I  put it on at night too, loads then put on cotton gloves. A few nights of that and it's usually getting better. Oh and softer water helps too, I moved across the country.... Different water, different affect.
  2. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in kiln building   
    The cement blocks in center will not take the heat -especially from one layer of hard brick-3 layers would be needed.Just make the whole thing(the cement blok area) out of hard brick. 
    The arch needs to be supported at area where the wall comes up and the arch sits in top.Thats where you need steel Bracing
    I like a mortar with less clay content ,high grog content and more high temp materials -along with some vermiculite -Hopefully your clay can take the heat. You could add alumina as well.
  3. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in kiln building   
    @Pawelpksa The cement blocks are either going to spall (explode) or calcine and fall apart. Since they are essentially inside the kiln, they will not be able to handle the heat, especially with only one layer of hard brick covering them. Even with 3 layers of hard brick I wouldn't trust them to do well inside the kiln like that. When we use cinder block under the kiln, they can cool off because they have openings that allow air flow. You should build the entire pedestal out of kiln bricks.
    You'll need 3 layers of hard brick for the floor, and they should be up on cinder block as well, or you're going to spall the concrete slab. I've seen the results of a kiln built directly on a slab- not good.
  4. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in kiln building   
    If you put blanket between the layers of brick, it will compress and lose its insulating benefits. It really should be on cinder blocks for air flow.
  5. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in kiln building   
    Since you have already build this much .You could add a layer of soft brick to floor that is exposed and then another layer of hard brick on top so the 3 layers is there .
    3 layers is the minimum and on a slab . I have seen a slab crack and explode during a fire-not pretty
  6. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in What’s on your workbench?   
    Un loaded two kilns  this week and have dispersed most of it. I'm taking a break from clay some (still putting in a few days a week) in next 6-8 weeks.
    The last remodel project is starting on the house .Its a big one -but only one room-the main bedroom. About everything one can do to a room-
  7. Like
    Benzine reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    Right now 40 jars sitting in the shop waiting for honey/spoon lids, 26 in the kiln, Mug throwing next week 75 for the order, probably get them thrown on Tues & Thursday. Recycling thawed out clay is rougher this year, but doable. Now use a heavy wiggle wire to cut bread slabs, spray and slam. Used to put finger holes in the slab, this is quicker and easier. Wiggle grooves hold water well.
     
    best,
    Pres
  8. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Up in Smoke Pottery in What’s on your workbench?   
    I've been using some leftover scraps from "Construction Plastic".  It's what contractors and such put up, to protect against dust getting out of the work area, to catch paint drips, etc.  It's thicker stuff, and keeps the moisture in quite well.
    It's been so rainy here lately, that my basement stays pretty damp itself.  If I just poured some plaster on the floor, it would be one big damp box.
  9. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Rae Reich in Giffin Grip 1984   
    I understand the view, of those opposed to them, as they see it as a crutch, to a process that potters should know. 
    But it is a quick way to center, especially in the bulk, that you are dealing with Mark.  It is also a good way to recenter for decorating.  I just used mine to day, to recenter a leatherhard piece, right side up, to apply even coats of underglaze.  Tap centering that form, right side up, would have been quite difficult.  Plus, the feet hold the ware in place, without leaving clay dust on the outside areas, I already underglazed.
    Also, in my classroom, the Giffen Grip is invaluable.  I barely have time to teach the kids to use the wheel to throw the form, so I definitely do not have time to teach them tap centering.  So I can still teach trimming, without that extra step and frustration.  I still talk about tap centering, and show it to them, I just don't expect them to do it.
     
    Regardless, tap centering isn't going anywhere.  The Giffen Grip does not work well for altered forms, that aren't symmetrical, and of course, not everyone wants to spend over a hundred bucks, for a Giffen Grip.
  10. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Rae Reich in What’s on your workbench?   
    I've been using some leftover scraps from "Construction Plastic".  It's what contractors and such put up, to protect against dust getting out of the work area, to catch paint drips, etc.  It's thicker stuff, and keeps the moisture in quite well.
    It's been so rainy here lately, that my basement stays pretty damp itself.  If I just poured some plaster on the floor, it would be one big damp box.
  11. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Grace london in Crazing disaster   
    I've seen a lot of people are using an epoxy and such, for tabletops.  They seal things under them, so they are still visible, but the epoxy creates a usable surface.  So perhaps applying something like that, to create a coating around it.
    Beautiful piece, by the way.
  12. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in Giffin Grip 1984   
    I was going thru an old filing cabinet and found my orginal receipts for my 1st Giffen grip and a letter from Brian the owner thanksing me for buying it. Dated 1984.
    I know these are still controversial but for me they are (I own 3 of them now as well as the larger one) just another tool in the tool box the past 35 years
  13. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Skutt model 181 kiln?   
    Thinner brick use slightly more electricity, but they cool faster. The other potential issue is that they radiate more heat because they aren't insulated as well. Depending on your space and how it is vented, that may or may not be an issue.
    If a kiln is rated to cone 10, it will get to cone 10, regardless of the brick thickness. I rarely sell new kilns that aren't 3" brick, but 2.5" brick is not a deal breaker with a used kiln at a good price IMO.
    L&L's most powerful kilns, the JH crystalline series, are rated for cone 12, but are built with 2.5" brick. The thinner brick allow for faster cooling times, and more precise temperature control.
  14. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Skutt model 181 kiln?   
    There's very little reason to fire to cone 10 in an electric kiln. Your glazes won't look the same as pots fired in a gas kiln to cone 10, because you can't do reduction in an electric. You might as well fire to cone 6 and save the wear and tear on your kiln. There are really nice vitrified, translucent, cone 6 porcelain bodies available from most clay suppliers.
  15. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in Skutt model 181 kiln?   
    And can someone tell me if I *Have* to have 3” bricks in a ^10 kiln?    Or can I get away with the 2.5” brick?
     
    Yes you will need 3 inch brick for cone 10 and really that is just a bare minimum .Forget about 2.5 for cone 10
  16. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in Skutt model 181 kiln?   
    A cone 6 kiln will only get to cone 6 when the elements are in perfect condition. That may mean only 30-50 firings. You could contact Skutt and ask them about using different elements that would allow that kiln to go to cone 10. That would mean that the kiln would pull higher amperage, though. Typically in an 18x18 kiln they pull 24 amps, which means you'd need a 30 amp breaker. You would probably need a new power cord to handle the higher amperage, and the internal wiring may need to be upgraded as well. All of that is pretty inexpensive, though, if you can do it yourself. If you got the kiln cheap, and the bricks are in good condition, it would be worth it.
  17. Like
    Benzine reacted to spiffypix in Skutt model 181 kiln?   
    Thanks so much, Arnold.  I have to be honest, I saw a Paragon Dragon on Craigslist for $1000 and I almost went for it.  But a 75 amp breaker with 4 gauge wire.... gasp!  It’s too much for what I need.  But what a kiln. 

    And for anyone who may come across this post in the future, here is a great, great video I found that teaches you all about maintaining your kiln, along with how electricity works lol.  I needed to learn both of those things.
     

    Thanks again.  

     
  18. Like
    Benzine reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in black specks in white glaze   
    are the lids on the glaze containers metal; are you using any metallic containers, tools, brushes, etc. in the glazing steps?   
  19. Like
    Benzine reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    Am I the only dork left using dry cleaner plastic?
  20. Like
    Benzine reacted to liambesaw in New and need quick advise   
    Yes, wait for the cones, maybe the kilnsitter cone broke.
  21. Like
    Benzine reacted to neilestrick in New and need quick advise   
    Could be a broken cone, or your sitter is not calibrated.
  22. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in Crash Cooling   
    Yes my pots did not crash through quartz inversion so that was a great thing. I'm unloading kiln today at 3 pm-I already took a bunch of stuff from it to outlets.
    This year was super for sales as Mothers day and graduation weekend at the collage where on two separate weekends-Often its the same weekend . So I made sales at a show at UC Davis far away for 3 days over mothers day and all outlets sold well that weekend as well as the next weekend  when the state collage has 2,600 graduates with parents mostly from out of town  visiting so sales again spike at the outlets.Checks will be rolling in and I had to restock 8 outlets as well again.
  23. Like
    Benzine reacted to Mark C. in Crash Cooling   
    Ok we all know not to cool a kiln  down to fast. I had some friends who cracked their advancer shelves by opening the damper to soon to cool off their downdraft 30 cubic foot kiln.
    I alwaysa close the damper at cone 11 and let it sit for a few days until last Saturday.
    You know when ceramics seems like its flowing along well than wam two X four in the head.
    Last Saturday I was firing two glaze kilns (both gas) started them at 5.30 am. The 1st one went off at 4.30 pm and I closed it up as I have a thousand times before.
    We get into a routine about these things or so we think.
    Second kiln cone 11, 1/2 way down  at 5 PM -turn off 4 burners on right side and then the other 4 burners left side.
    About 3 hours later I sat down on couch in living room and noticed the heat waves reflecting on my socks-I jumped up realizing the low sun was showing the heat waves into the living room meaning the damper never got shut down 3 hours ago. I raced out and shut the damper. The digital pyro showed the kiln dropped 1,000 degrees in that 3 hour period. I was off on a two day trip to SF in the am and for two days  thought about the worst-broken shelves cracked pots under oxidized glazes-you name it. I have never done this in 45 years-made a damper mistake.
    I knew the cystals would not be there in the glazes 9they needs slow cooling to form) What else can happen to a 35 cubic kiln load of stuffed porcelain pots when its crashed cooled.
    Last night when arriving from a 6 hour drive I opened the kiln to find all is well. The only thing so far noticed is my brown glaze is muddy and very brown not reddish. I have yet to unload it all so we shall see what else is astray .
    Just when its all going so well-even the pros get it wrong now and again.Ceramics is most humbling at times
  24. Like
    Benzine got a reaction from Rae Reich in What’s on your workbench?   
    Thought that was a foam cooler.  That's a great idea for a damp box, since it's strong, yet light.  I just lightly cover my mugs, after attaching handles, basically until the handles firm up.  I used to have issues with the join developing hairline cracks, when used to use magic water *and*  a joining slip.  Since then, I switch to only magic water, and zero cracks. 
  25. Like
    Benzine reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Yep, Costco tote with a couple inch o plaster in the bottom.  If I put them in there for a day or two after attaching handles they even out a bit
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