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allenc27

New kiln first firing, bad smell

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Hi everyone. I recently purchased a electric / gas dual firing kiln and was told to do a 1200 c firing to get rid of the first firing bad smell. I forget to switch it to oxidation firing and the venting hose was inside the house without me noticing until later on. It was fired empty kiln with just kiln shelves and stands. It was set to fire 12 hours and during the 4th hour I started notice bad smell and turn on the fans and windows and moved to safe zone. At 8th hour I notice the whole house is this smell and it stings my eyes. I probably inhaled 3 hours of these, might be lessor because i had opened the window a bit. I'm not sure.

So my question is, am I gonna be in serious deep trouble now after inhaled the fume for 3 hours? Is this real bad? I'm worry I'm gonna die?

Edited by allenc27

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I think that first we need to know what was causing the bad smell. I've never had a kiln put out a bad smell during the first firing other than during the first few minutes when the oil on the element wire is burning off.

What is being used to create the reduction atmosphere?

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Have you checked to see if you are missing a dog or cat or pet hamster?:o There's a good probability that you are not going to die...was there any kind of residue in the kiln when you opened it up...or have you even opened it up yet?

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1 hour ago, neilestrick said:

I think that first we need to know what was causing the bad smell. I've never had a kiln put out a bad smell during the first firing other than during the first few minutes when the oil on the element wire is burning off.

What is being used to create the reduction atmosphere?

The gas line didn't hook up gas tank. So electric powered up to 1200 c degree. Sure used a lot of electricity.

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Since you're not dead yet, you'll probably be fine. You said you forgot to switch it to oxidation firing- what does that mean? If the gas tank wasn't hooked up and you were firing with electricity, then you were firing in oxidation. I just don't see how an empty kiln can cause that much odor.

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@allenc27 What is the make and model of your kiln? I’ve honestly never heard of a combination electric/gas kiln for pottery. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong.  My understanding is that a reduction atmosphere would be too corrosive for electric elements, unless you have very heavy duty elements which are generally considered too cost prohibitive for pottery kilns. 

Also, if your kiln is meant to burn gas, it should not be inside your house. 

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3 minutes ago, GEP said:

@allenc27 What is the make and model of your kiln? I’ve honestly never heard of a combination electric/gas kiln for pottery. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong.  My understanding is that a reduction atmosphere would be too corrosive for electric elements, unless you have very heavy duty elements which are generally considered too cost prohibitive for pottery kilns. 

Also, if your kiln is meant to burn gas, it should not be inside your house. 

They're somewhat common outside of the US.  I've seen some Chinese ones that use silicon carbide rod elements, and seen Italian ones that use coils.  I think they probably just end up replacing the wire elements more often and chalk it up to operating costs.

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Do you have the kiln in your house,?   I use to e-mail with a beginner potter, found out he had him kiln in his house when he  nearly  burned his whole house down.  He gave up pottery when that happen.   Denice

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36 minutes ago, Denice said:

Do you have the kiln in your house,?   I use to e-mail with a beginner potter, found out he had him kiln in his house when he  nearly  burned his whole house down.  He gave up pottery when that happen.   Denice

A kiln can be perfectly safe in a house, as long as you set it up and use it according to manufacturer's specs. It's no more likely to burn down your house than your garage or commercial building.

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6 hours ago, neilestrick said:

Since you're not dead yet, you'll probably be fine. You said you forgot to switch it to oxidation firing- what does that mean? If the gas tank wasn't hooked up and you were firing with electricity, then you were firing in oxidation. I just don't see how an empty kiln can cause that much odor.

However there is a switch to fire reduction which uses gas to heat up at 1100 c, as well a venting hose sucks the air out. That hose suppose to be hookup to a hole on the door to vent out the air to the outside of the house.

 

And I don't know what cause the odor, I will ask the manufacturer.

 

Actually combine gas firing at which temperature can be programmed.

Edited by allenc27

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6 hours ago, GEP said:

@allenc27 What is the make and model of your kiln? I’ve honestly never heard of a combination electric/gas kiln for pottery. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong.  My understanding is that a reduction atmosphere would be too corrosive for electric elements, unless you have very heavy duty elements which are generally considered too cost prohibitive for pottery kilns. 

Also, if your kiln is meant to burn gas, it should not be inside your house. 

Ya dual firing system is new in Taiwan many personal studio uses it to get a minor reduction effect. Its not as reduction as full gas kiln. I have the kiln at the entrance of my house, now I'm gonna move it outside of the house because this incident.

 

Here is the link of the brand. Sorry its all Mandarin. Brand is Lonkai, they are leading brand for these dual firing kilns in Taiwan.

http://www.longkai.com.tw/tw_products_detail.asp?Fkindno=F000001&Pidno=201205290001

Edited by allenc27

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not part of the discussion but i tried the website and the English translation.   you might want to suggest that the company employ a translator who is a potter.   the descriptions of the equipment is not understandable  unless being read by a potter who has seen similar items being used elsewhere.   i do not know what a "wash and gush out the glaze platform' can be  but the  "embryo drawing machine" is a potters wheel.

Edited by oldlady
correction

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