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S. Dean

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  1. Like
    S. Dean got a reaction from liambesaw in Is there a place to buy a used slab roller & wall-mounted extruder?   
    TA Metalworks in Canada manufactures a quality extruder for a good price.  It looks very similar to the Bailey 4" extruder.  I've sent you a PM with additional information and links.
    Regarding slab rollers, you may want to search the forums as there are several posts on building tables for the Bailey slab roller.  Bailey will send designs upon request  - you will need to specify DRD or DRDII because they have different builds.   The designs contain enough information to build a table, but they are not full construction drawings so you will need to determine a lot of dimensions yourself.  Please note that the DRDII slab roller requires different table heights on the feed side and the output side of the machine, and there are some pretty tight spacing tolerances between the table tops and the rollers.    In my opinion, this is not a project for a novice wood worker.   I ordered a 24 inch DRDII (machine only) and had 2 tables built for it (one small one for the machine itself, and  a larger work table to receive the slabs).  I chose this approach for added functionality/flexibility, because I wanted to be able to roll the machine into a corner when not needed while having a general work table in the studio. This was more expensive than ordering the table from Bailey.   Factoring in cost and time, I'm not sure you end up saving much by building your own. table (even a simpler one), especially with the recent spike in lumber prices.
  2. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Jeff Longtin in Porcelain slip like seeley doll slip   
    I was introduced to Seeley and Bell Porcelain slip back in the 90's. (When I made a few molds for doll artists.) I found both to be very white and very vitreous. I also noticed that both developed green mold fairly quickly. Recently I've returned to mixing my own and found that recipes that use English Grolleg Kaolin have the same qualities. (Whereas recipes with EPK or #6 Tile do not.) A recipe from claybucket.com is proving to work nicely. 
    10,000 gms water
    80 gms Darvan
    100 gms Bentonite
    11000 English Grolleg Kaolin
    4600 Nep Sye
    4400 Flint
     
     
     
     
  3. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Min in Can you use glaze to stick a plant pot onto a saucer?   
    I'ld just fire them separately then there are no worries they will come apart.
  4. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Bam2015 in Customer complaint: handle came off a mug   
    I would just replace the mug and not ask for the broken one back. Although you will be explaining to the customer that you want to learn from the broken mug, you also risk them thinking that you are placing blame (even if they are the reason for the handle falling off). 
    I bought a mug about 5 yrs ago from a well known, well respected, experience potter and it leaked the first time I used it. He willingly took it back and gave me a replacement, but I felt like he was blaming me, he inferred that I "bumped" it on something. Well I didn't bump it, and although I appreciated him giving me a new one, I didn't like that he implied that I was at fault. 
    Your customer might not tell others about your excellent customer service, but he/she will certainly tell others about what they perceive as poor customer service.
    My two cents....from a customer perspective.
  5. Like
    S. Dean reacted to liambesaw in Customer complaint: handle came off a mug   
    I just give a replacement.  The amount of people who would cheat some way in this situation are so minimal and are the worst people to deal with it's just not worth my trouble.  The caveat being that this is the only replacement they'll get.
    Just try not to take it as a judgement of your work.  Pottery is fragile, things like this happen, but a mug should last more than 2 months for sure.
  6. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Denice in single pass vs multiple pass slab roller   
    I started out with  a pastry chefs rolling pin,   I didn't buy my Baily slab roller until I started  making tiles.   I still get out my rolling pin  on smaller projects.   I bought the Baily without the table and my husband built me one from the instructions that came with it.   I have had it for twenty five years,  still works like its new.   Just make sure this is what she really needs and has the room for it.    Denice
  7. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Chilly in Loading square shelves   
    If it's a front loader, put the single post at the back, and two at the front.  Then you can always add a pot or two without the post getting in your way.
     
  8. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Mark C. in I want to buy a kiln. What accessories should be on my shopping list?   
    glasses that protect you from the infrared glow looking in a kiln.
  9. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Mark C. in Frit 4124 or substitute   
    Rick I cleaned out a deseased friends pottery studio who had a tons of Frits. I gave away as much as I could to some members here and the local collage. I still have a box full of odd numbers I feel . I may have some and I just looked for about 10 m inutes for that box full. since its not something I ever use I know its deep out of studio area. In the light of day I'll look agin and if I find it you are more than welcome to it for ship cost(flat rate is cheap ). If I find it I;'ll pm you. The standard frits most use I gave awy already inkluding a 100# sack of old stuff.
  10. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Min in Tips for slumping large slabs into a bowl form   
    Look up the work of Ann Van Hoey, she slab builds large vessels then alters them. She uses patterns and joins clay slabs in the mold, joining and ribbing the seams smooth. Not sure if you can open it but an Pottery Making Illustrated article from her here.
  11. Like
    S. Dean got a reaction from Hulk in Newbie looking for a first kiln   
    Regarding the e28t, here's a great explanation that Neil provided in another post about why many manufacturer's 10 cubic foot kilns are rated to Cone 8:
    Lots of people fire to cone 6 in cone 8 kilns. They work fine, however like you said, the elements won't last as long since you're closer to maxing them out with every firing. The L&L E28T-3 and kilns of other brands all fall into this same situation. The reason these 10 cubic foot kilns don't go to cone 10 is because they want to make them so they are plug and play, rather than being hard wired. That means a max of 48 amps kiln draw. At 48 amps on 240 volt single phase power, they can only generate enough heat to get a kiln of that size to cone 8. At 208 volt single phase they only get to cone 5. However on 3 phase power either voltage can get to cone 10. All brands make 10 cubic foot models that will go to cone 10 on single phase power, so you're not out of luck if you need a kiln of that size. However they have to be hard wired and they need an 80 amp breaker, which may or may not be an issue, depending on what your breaker box can handle. If you're set on  Skutt look at the PK models.
    I've got the e28s and love the wide low design (easier to load/less bending over, wider diameter is more flexible ). However, there are times that I would like more height.  The e28M  was not offered when I purchased my kiln, but that is what I'd go for now - it seems to hit the sweet spot of width, height and power.
    -SD
      
  12. Like
    S. Dean reacted to neilestrick in Newbie looking for a first kiln   
    And the e28M-3 is rated to cone 10.
  13. Like
    S. Dean got a reaction from neilestrick in Newbie looking for a first kiln   
    Regarding the e28t, here's a great explanation that Neil provided in another post about why many manufacturer's 10 cubic foot kilns are rated to Cone 8:
    Lots of people fire to cone 6 in cone 8 kilns. They work fine, however like you said, the elements won't last as long since you're closer to maxing them out with every firing. The L&L E28T-3 and kilns of other brands all fall into this same situation. The reason these 10 cubic foot kilns don't go to cone 10 is because they want to make them so they are plug and play, rather than being hard wired. That means a max of 48 amps kiln draw. At 48 amps on 240 volt single phase power, they can only generate enough heat to get a kiln of that size to cone 8. At 208 volt single phase they only get to cone 5. However on 3 phase power either voltage can get to cone 10. All brands make 10 cubic foot models that will go to cone 10 on single phase power, so you're not out of luck if you need a kiln of that size. However they have to be hard wired and they need an 80 amp breaker, which may or may not be an issue, depending on what your breaker box can handle. If you're set on  Skutt look at the PK models.
    I've got the e28s and love the wide low design (easier to load/less bending over, wider diameter is more flexible ). However, there are times that I would like more height.  The e28M  was not offered when I purchased my kiln, but that is what I'd go for now - it seems to hit the sweet spot of width, height and power.
    -SD
      
  14. Like
    S. Dean reacted to neilestrick in Newbie looking for a first kiln   
    Move the outlet or have it hard wired.  Putting on a longer cord will negate the UL listing and possibly affect the warranty. Definitely get 3" brick. My advise is always to go wider, unless you really need the height.
  15. Like
    S. Dean reacted to neilestrick in Shimpo RK-2 pedal   
    In my experience, the pedal on those wheels is always stiff, and the arm is the easiest way to adjust the speed. I don't think I've ever been able to easily use the pedal with my foot.
    As for bat pins, standard bats have holes drilled 10" on center. The hole is 1/4", and the pins are 1/4-20 socket head screws. Get stainless steel pins. You can drill your own holes for the pins, you just have to make sure you're drilling in a spot where the hole is in a good place. Some wheel heads have ribs on the back side, so you want to make sure you're not hitting a rib. There need to be room for the wing nut on the back side. You also want to be fairly precise with your holes. It's a good idea to use a punch to make a starting mark for your drill bit, and start with a small bit, like 3/32", before jumping in with the 1/4", as the small bit is less likely to drift. If you mess up and the bats don't fit right, you can always fill the holes with JB Weld and try again in a different spot.
  16. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Benzine in What do I cover my work table with?   
    Yeah, like Liam said, bare wood works very well.  If you want something more porous, cement board is a great option.  It absorbs moisture well, and is pretty durable, unless you are rough with it. 
    I have a couple dozen cement boards we use in my classroom, and they've worked extremely well.  The only downside is, they are heavier than wood, and can be damaged easily if you aren't careful.  But if I can keep mine in decent shape with teenagers using them, then it should be fine in a home studio. 
  17. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Dick White in Custer Feldspar Substitution   
    Some history and clarification about the G200 series feldspars - G200 was (the important word: "was") a potash spar roughly equivalent to Custer at the time it was in production. The G200 mine in Monticello, GA began to run out in the early 2000s, but they were able to keep the brand going by using a feldspar from another mine in Siloam, GA (about 50 miles distant). That feldspar, however, was considerably higher in its potassium content. They resolved the chemistry by trucking a soda feldspar in from Spruce Pine, NC (about 250 miles distant, probably from a mine near the Minspar source and the now-closed Kona F4 source mines) and blending it 70:30 Siloam potash spar:Spruce Pine soda spar. In about 2009, the company decided it was getting too expensive to truck both feldspars for processing and blending in Monticello, so they announce to their customer base that henceforth they would sell only Siloam product with the higher potassium, now labeled as G200HP. They revealed that they had been blending it for years and customers could either blend it themselves with Minspar or recalculate their glazes to the higher potassium content of the G200HP.  Lauguna, for example, began mixing them in their own facility and selling it as "Old Blend." However, as happens in the world of mined products, the Siloam mine ran out in about 2013, and G200HP is now unavailable. To meet the demand for a potash spar, they began to import a potash feldspar from Spain that was comparable to the original G200, and labeled it as G200EU. This product remains currently available, but not as widely carried by distributors and a bit more expensive due to the transport costs from Spain.
    At the same time, Laguna found a potash spar in India that is very similar to the original (and blended) G200 and imports it under the name Mahavir feldspar.
    Shifting now to the Custer issue, the original G200 and the blended G200 were roughly equivalent at the time, and often subbed 1 for 1 for each other in glaze recipes with no problem. When potters began to realize the bag of G200 they had so blithely just picked up from their distributor was in fact G200HP (the bag and label coloring were similar, only the printed name with the additional letters "HP" was the give-away) and their glazes were overfluxing, some did their own blending but then changed to using Custer. But then people who had long been using Custer began to notice their glazes were underfiring. After some potters sent their Custer out for testing at independent labs, it was found that the Custer product was now actually significantly lower in potassium and alumina and higher in silica than advertised. Pacer Corp, the producer of Custer, still claims in its technical literature that the analysis is basically the same as advertised some 20 years ago and blames the problem on customer (the potters) misuse. In my experience and similarly reported by others, if you have an old recipe containing a significant amount of Custer (40%+), you might need to recalculate your recipe, or change to G200EU or Mahavir.
  18. Like
    S. Dean got a reaction from mrcasey in Measuring Air Born Silica Dust   
    +1 for what Min said.  Get a p100 respirator. 
    It is also important that the mask fits well so that you get a good seal.  A bad seal means reduced filtration effectiveness as unfiltered air and particles are getting around the mask and into your lungs.  So, if you have a small face structure and are wearing a mask that is too big, you will not get a seal.  3M offers many of their respirators in small, med and large sizes - so buy the correct size (this will get you a better chance of getting a good seal, but it's not a guarantee as some face shapes and some mask shapes just don't fit together to get a good seal).  Also, if you have facial hair, you will not get a good seal.   Here's some more info from OSHA about fit. https://www.osha.gov/video/respiratory_protection/fittesting_transcript.html.  Hospitals and other companies have equipment to conduct fit testing on each employee.  Unfortunately, as studio potters we don't have access to that kind of equipment and testing, so do what you can to get a mask that fits your face.  It might mean trying different models and manufacturers.
    Lastly, getting a p100 right now may be hard with COVID-19.  Many places seem to be sold out or holding stock for healthcare.  If a website says sold out, pick up the phone and see if you can get through that way.  Good luck.
    -SD
  19. Like
    S. Dean got a reaction from Min in Measuring Air Born Silica Dust   
    +1 for what Min said.  Get a p100 respirator. 
    It is also important that the mask fits well so that you get a good seal.  A bad seal means reduced filtration effectiveness as unfiltered air and particles are getting around the mask and into your lungs.  So, if you have a small face structure and are wearing a mask that is too big, you will not get a seal.  3M offers many of their respirators in small, med and large sizes - so buy the correct size (this will get you a better chance of getting a good seal, but it's not a guarantee as some face shapes and some mask shapes just don't fit together to get a good seal).  Also, if you have facial hair, you will not get a good seal.   Here's some more info from OSHA about fit. https://www.osha.gov/video/respiratory_protection/fittesting_transcript.html.  Hospitals and other companies have equipment to conduct fit testing on each employee.  Unfortunately, as studio potters we don't have access to that kind of equipment and testing, so do what you can to get a mask that fits your face.  It might mean trying different models and manufacturers.
    Lastly, getting a p100 right now may be hard with COVID-19.  Many places seem to be sold out or holding stock for healthcare.  If a website says sold out, pick up the phone and see if you can get through that way.  Good luck.
    -SD
  20. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Min in trouble with big pots   
    When reading Frank and Janet Hamer's Potters Dictionary they bring up a few things that I think apply to these cracks that point to a forming or drying issue rather than a firing one. Looking at the edges of the cracks they are not clean breaks, according to Hamer if the edges are frayed or rough then that indicates the crack(s) occurred slowly and probably happened during the making and drying stages even if they didn't show up until firing. I'm seeing some displacement of the rim which makes me wonder how thick the rim is compared to the rest of the pot. If there was a dormant crack from forming or drying and then during firing the cracked rim couldn't take the stress I think you would see this type of displacement. 
    There isn't much shrinkage between bone dry and bisque but if there was a lot of weight resting on a relatively thin rim (in proportion to the rest of the pot) then I wouldn't be firing these upside down. Break it open and look at the wall thickness.
  21. Like
    S. Dean reacted to neilestrick in Need help with which Thermocouples to get for L&L JD230   
    @Artist Mom NC What you have there are not the original TCs that came with the kiln. Someone has used an after-market TC and rigged up a way to hold them. The easiest thing to do would be to replace the TCs and the ceramic blocks that hold them with the ones that L&L has. It will be easier to source and replace them later that way. HERE is the part you want, the standard 8ga TC with block. It just takes two #6 panhead screws in the metal case to hold them in place. In the future, you only need to replace the thermocouple itself, not the ceramic block. If you want your TCs to last longer and not shed in your kiln, you could also install protection tubes. For those you'll also need the spacers kit.
  22. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Jo Reid in Creative Industries Pottery Wheels   
    I have a very old Creative Industries Model JR. I am experiencing the latency in start up and slow down and the wheel struggles with over 20# of clay. So I have two questions:   Is this problem the nature of the wheel or can it be fixed?  What is the HP for the KR. 
     Also, I have an extra splash pan for the JR - willing to supply to anyone in need. 
  23. Like
    S. Dean reacted to Hulk in Creative Industries Pottery Wheels   
    Check Claybabe's post on page two, the .pdf is still available.
    https://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/37-anyone-have-a-really-old-creative-industries-model-mp-wheel/page/2/
    ...looks like JohnnyK posted the same manual on page three!
    Per said manual, CI wheels have a reversing plug; the Jr model is .25 hp, "...can center 25 pounds of clay..." 
    Centering capacity and hp ratings - not an exact science. If your JR model is still running well, give it a break and stick to small pots?

  24. Like
    S. Dean reacted to neilestrick in Kiln Manuacturer Closures Due To Coronavirus   
    I received notices today from Skutt and Paragon saying they are now closed to due Coronavirus lockdowns required by their states. L&L is remaining open, as they can met the requirements needed to keep their employees separated while working. I have not heard anything from Olympic, and their web site does not say they are closed. The state of Georgia has not issued a lockdown yet, but I'm sure it's coming soon as they have over 700 confirmed cases. Evenheat Kilns is closed due to the Michigan lockdown order.
    So if you need kiln parts during the shutdown, for the most part you'll need to find a distributor that's still open and has what you need in inventory.
  25. Like
    S. Dean reacted to JohnnyK in Griffin Grip - I like it, but what a mess it makes!   
    I have an old Creative industries wheel and had the same problem with the height of the splash pan, so I found a plastic bucket  with the top portion near the size of my splash pan and cut it so that it is higher than the throw-off of the GG. You'll just have to find a bucket of the right size for your Brent...
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