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Benzine

Firing A "large" Slab

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Benzine    609

Yeah Pres, I double checked the kiln again today, the controller does indeed attach on two sections. So no unstacking/ stacking of the layers around large wares.

 

The slab fired today, and had cooled to around eight hundred, by the time I was leaving. So naturally I had to quickly peek.

 

The slab made it through the firing intact!

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Benzine    609

Job well done!

I'd like to thank the Academy....

 

Seriously though, thank you all, for the suggestions. I'll post some photos after the second firing....I shouldn't need the coils for that right?

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bciskepottery    925

Seriously though, thank you all, for the suggestions. I'll post some photos after the second firing....I shouldn't need the coils for that right?

Your platter will expand and shrink in second firing, too. Recommend keep the coils/slats.

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Benzine    609

 

Seriously though, thank you all, for the suggestions. I'll post some photos after the second firing....I shouldn't need the coils for that right?

Your platter will expand and shrink in second firing, too. Recommend keep the coils/slats.

I wondered about that. Would some one inch shelf posts, laid on their side work OK as well? It will be less of a hassle to use those, than to keep all the coils we used, for the first firing.

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bciskepottery    925

I'd stick with the coils, they've already been bisqued and will expand/shrink at the same rate as the slab in the second firing. Your posts will neither expand nor shrink.

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Benzine    609

I'd stick with the coils, they've already been bisqued and will expand/shrink at the same rate as the slab in the second firing. Your posts will neither expand nor shrink.

Ah yes, I didn't think about that. I'll just use the coils again then, and give them to the student after the second firing, as a souvenir.....No student ever wants the "Souvenirs" I offer them; the exposed ends of their 35mm film, dried acrylic peeled off the palettes, etc......

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Babs    385

 

I'd stick with the coils, they've already been bisqued and will expand/shrink at the same rate as the slab in the second firing. Your posts will neither expand nor shrink.

Ah yes, I didn't think about that. I'll just use the coils again then, and give them to the student after the second firing, as a souvenir.....No student ever wants the "Souvenirs" I offer them; the exposed ends of their 35mm film, dried acrylic peeled off the palettes, etc......

 

Such a giver!

Could suggest he paints them, totem sticks...

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Benzine    609

Alright, the relief was stained, and fired the second time, on the coils. I turned out well, but as you can see from the photo, a small stress crack appeared. I was able to unload it, with no issues. I looked on the back, and it appears the crack originates from, one of the areas, the student hollowed out. It was a corner area, so that sharp point probably had a lot of stress, during the firing.

 

I have no idea, how weak the crack is, but I definitely want to reinforce it. I was thinking of some Gorilla glue on the back side, to hold, and maybe some epoxy on the crack on the front, with some paint to hide disguise the crack.

 

Any suggestions?

post-15067-0-35612500-1393514471_thumb.jpg

post-15067-0-35612500-1393514471_thumb.jpg

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Pres    896

Looks like it could be a cooling dunt, don't know.  My best thought is to fill areas of crack in the back with epoxy putty working it in with old credit card. Front could probably be matched up with acrylic and a lot of work.

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bciskepottery    925

Mounting the slab on a round piece of plywood on the back would give it stability and allow for wall hanging. The plywood backing could be a bit bigger and painted to serve as a border, or just match the size of the slab.

 

You and your student did a terrific job. His art work is wonderful; the firing job well done.

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Pres    896

Great thought, Bruce, on the plywood backing, could even be a frame edge, also easier to hang.

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Benzine    609

Mounting the slab on a round piece of plywood on the back would give it stability and allow for wall hanging. The plywood backing could be a bit bigger and painted to serve as a border, or just match the size of the slab.

 

You and your student did a terrific job. His art work is wonderful; the firing job well done.

 

 

Great thought, Bruce, on the plywood backing, could even be a frame edge, also easier to hang.

 

Yeah, a wood mount is kind of what I was thinking as well.  The display, initially, was to use a specially made "plate" stand.  Since the coloring has a nice rustic look, I suggested, that the stand also have a similar look.  I thought, about taking a torch to the wood, to give it such a look.  With a wood backing, the same could be done to that.

 

What kind of glue is recommended?

 

Great effort Benzine, whew, what a relief!

Like th idea of backing and hanging.

Best with the repair job.

Babs

 

Thank you much.

 

What a great project.  Your student should be very happy with this, and proud.

 

We are both happy with the results.  I plan to enter it, in a couple of the art shows we have coming up.

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Benzine    609

We are getting ready to mount the piece on wood. What would be the best adhesive choice?

 

I know I've seen JB Weld mentioned frquently by someone (Mark?).

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