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S Crack Opinion


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#1 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 01:00 PM

I have some pots from last year that have s cracks (on the underside), but they do not go all the way through, and they do not leak. (I have filled water in them overnight and placed a piece of paper underneath to see if any extra moisture comes out)  Are these pieces trash due to the s crack or is it the leaking that would make it trash?


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#2 Pres

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 01:22 PM

What is the issue? If you are asking if these are sales worthy, I would say no. If you are asking if there is harm in using them around the house I would say yes. S cracks are something visible, and an obvious flaw in the formation or trimming of the pot. For that reason, I really don't allow "S" crack ware in sales, it comes back to bite me.  Even in my early years I did not sell these things as they were too obvious. At the same time I don't sell pots with cracks at the joins of two pieces or handles, I don't sell the cracks that on occasion occur on the inside of lids or other place either.   Years ago I had problems with "S" cracks when throwing off the hump, relearned how to throw off the hump and solved the problem. Thats my personal opinion about the dreaded "S" crack.  I do know some professional potters that really don't think a second time about them and have them in their booths.


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#3 Benzine

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 01:23 PM

If they don't leak, then I would think the issue would just be structural. So they would likely break sooner, from use, especially with heating and cooling involved.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#4 MMB

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 02:26 PM

I know that paper clay has been used to reattach broken handles on ware that has already been bisquit fired so wouldnt a possible way to mend the form be through the use of paper clay? fill the crack and smooth it out then refire. Yes this is camouflaging the problem but is also adding to it strength. I still wouldnt sell such a piece, but I would rather just keep it as a stock mug or what not in the kitchen.



#5 Humboldt Potter

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 06:41 PM

My own view is that a flawed or cracked pot doesn't represent my work. I don't want it out in the world. I keep the "seconds" at home. Once a piece is out in the world, you have no way of knowing how it will be used or who will see it. Put it in the microwave, it's hot, it cracks, someone gets burned... No thanks.
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#6 Diane Puckett

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 09:29 PM

Still haunted by one I gave to a charity auction years ago. Either keep it yourself or take a hammer to it.
Diane Puckett
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#7 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 11:58 PM

haha- I fear my dog is going to have more dishes than I do before long. ;) 


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#8 Diane Puckett

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 04:18 AM

Consider saving some for mosaics. Pam Brewer does some fabulous mosaic work www.pambrewer.com.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#9 oldlady

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 10:09 AM

you are at the beginning of your career.  now is the time to make those decisions that will become your character and integrity.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#10 JBaymore

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 12:21 PM

you are at the beginning of your career.  now is the time to make those decisions that will become your character and integrity.

 

Wise words!

 

best,

 

...............john


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#11 Babs

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 03:44 AM

S Crack..compress the base after opening up your clay, be aware of  the thickness of your base when trimming foot, put thrown work onto dryish surfaces, clear water from bottom of pot as you throw....When drying invert  pot on rim when it is firm enough. It's a fault , a "second" if you don't mind selling inferior work, great for garden pots esp. if broken.






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