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Obvara Firing Technique

Alternative firing surfaces

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#1 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 05:55 PM

Attached File  Obvaraw:handles.jpg   36.8KB   3 downloads

I just posted some how-to photos and results of Obvara firing. I really like the patterns created from reducing the pieces in a wheatpaste brew.
http://ceramicartsda...saggars-obvara/
Fired to 1650 and reduced in a liquid flour, sugar yeast brew 3 days old.Rinsed and cooled in water

This is suppose to be a Slovakian technique.

Marcia

#2 OffCenter

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 06:22 PM

The one in your post above is my favorite. As I said on your FB page, you're doing some incredible work this summer!

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:03 PM

Thanks Jim. Although it is stinking hot down here and my dripping sweat stained the terra sig on the foil saggars, I have been doing a lot of exploration. I hope I get to the beach this summer.It is only 22 miles away.
Marcia

#4 Benzine

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:07 PM

Marcia, it's always great to see what you are working on. Very interesting indeed.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 10:54 PM

thanks Benzine. The Obvara firing technique is interesting and no smoke. Good for urban settings. A good teaching tool.

#6 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 06:55 AM

I made up several test clay bodies: perlite, cat litter, sawdust, coffee grounds and brass shavings.
The pits where the additives were soaked up the carbon.Places where the solution drips can make feather
patterns. Pieces need to stay around the 1650 temp coming out of the kiln. If it gets cooler, the solution
is more black or not carbonizing.

Marcia

#7 oldlady

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 10:48 AM

amazing!  and i do not use that word in everyday converstation

 

 marcia, it is another example of the unlimited possibilities available to potters.  anything goes, finding what appeals to your own sensibilities is the hard  part.


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#8 Bob Coyle

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 07:30 PM

SUCH BEAUTIFUL POTS!

 

Is there a link that gives a fuller explanation of your technique.

 

A few of us Santa Fe potters are planning a group pit fire this fall. Would this technique work in this type of a situation or do you have to have a more controlled temperature?



#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 09:57 PM

There is a lot of info about it online. You need o fire to 1650 all pull pots out hot like in raku.
Marcia

#10 Benzine

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 10:28 PM

I just watched another video on the technique.  It looks pretty straight forward, minus the witch's brew that you dunk the pieces in initially. 

 

Are there multiple recipes for the dunking liquid?

 

Also, what would happen if you incorporated a reduction phase, like traditional Raku?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:10 AM

I just watched another video on the technique.  It looks pretty straight forward, minus the witch's brew that you dunk the pieces in initially. 
 
Are there multiple recipes for the dunking liquid?
 
Also, what would happen if you incorporated a reduction phase, like traditional Raku?

here is the brew:
1 kilo or 2.2 pounds of flour
1 tbsp of sugar
1-2 packets of yeast
10 liters or 2.6 gallons of water
mix, cover and let it ferment for 3 days.
SInce this happens at 1650, colder then raku, and you need the porosity of the clay,reduction might obsure the cool patterns.
Marcia

#12 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:30 AM

Just saw this post, so please ignore my asking about the "witch's brew" in my p.m. Marcia. Thank you very much for sharing the receipt. Will sure try it some day... Do you think I can get 1650F in a pit? Want to try the obvara technique also in a pit or a drum instead of a kiln. Taking out the works after, say, 4 hours of pit firing....?

 

Evelyne


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#13 Benzine

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:00 AM

 

I just watched another video on the technique.  It looks pretty straight forward, minus the witch's brew that you dunk the pieces in initially. 
 
Are there multiple recipes for the dunking liquid?
 
Also, what would happen if you incorporated a reduction phase, like traditional Raku?

here is the brew:
1 kilo or 2.2 pounds of flour
1 tbsp of sugar
1-2 packets of yeast
10 liters or 2.6 gallons of water
mix, cover and let it ferment for 3 days.
SInce this happens at 1650, colder then raku, and you need the porosity of the clay,reduction might obsure the cool patterns.
Marcia

 

Yeah, that's the recipe, I've seen elsewhere too.  Is that the only recipe though, or can other things be added to the mix?

 

What's the purpose of the yeast?  To make it foamy?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:11 AM

the yeast ferments the brew. It make influence the pattern development on the flatter surfaces. SOme look like lichen or feathers.
Marcia

#15 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:17 AM

Just saw this post, so please ignore my asking about the "witch's brew" in my p.m. Marcia. Thank you very much for sharing the receipt. Will sure try it some day... Do you think I can get 1650F in a pit? Want to try the obvara technique also in a pit or a drum instead of a kiln. Taking out the works after, say, 4 hours of pit firing....?
 
Evelyne

I am firing in my small raku kiln which is a little taller than 2/3 of an oil drum. I am thinking of making a smaller one for tests and simple firings. The kiln reaches 1650 in about 45 minutes if I hold back and am not fighting the wind.
Marcia

#16 Up in Smoke Pottery

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:23 AM

I 've been playing with Obvara for a little over a year now, that is the recipe.  Approximate amounts is fine,  I have found slight differences in different flours, but not much.  You may want to have a beer on hand to "liven" up the mixture if it looses it fizz or you get delayed a day or two.


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#17 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:09 AM

 

Just saw this post, so please ignore my asking about the "witch's brew" in my p.m. Marcia. Thank you very much for sharing the receipt. Will sure try it some day... Do you think I can get 1650F in a pit? Want to try the obvara technique also in a pit or a drum instead of a kiln. Taking out the works after, say, 4 hours of pit firing....?
 
Evelyne

I am firing in my small raku kiln which is a little taller than 2/3 of an oil drum. I am thinking of making a smaller one for tests and simple firings. The kiln reaches 1650 in about 45 minutes if I hold back and am not fighting the wind.
Marcia

 

 

So you don't think I can do Obvara in an open fire pit?

 

Evelyne


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In love with alternative firing methods
www.schoenmann-ceramics.ch


#18 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:27 AM

Just saw this post, so please ignore my asking about the "witch's brew" in my p.m. Marcia. Thank you very much for sharing the receipt. Will sure try it some day... Do you think I can get 1650F in a pit? Want to try the obvara technique also in a pit or a drum instead of a kiln. Taking out the works after, say, 4 hours of pit firing....?
 
Evelyne

I am firing in my small raku kiln which is a little taller than 2/3 of an oil drum. I am thinking of making a smaller one for tests and simple firings. The kiln reaches 1650 in about 45 minutes if I hold back and am not fighting the wind.
Marcia

 
So you don't think I can do Obvara in an open fire pit?M
Marcia
 
Evelyne

If you can get to 1650 F go for it!
I think you would need to stoke a bit.Manolo Sala (Spain) gets copper fluxing in his pit firing of slab, so use a pyrometer and see how hot it really gets.
Marcia

#19 mss

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 12:27 PM

Bonus!  Make some bread with your fermented starter.



#20 Benzine

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 03:28 PM

Bonus!  Make some bread with your fermented starter.

That's what I was thinking!

 

Marcia, I forgot to ask, is the clay just left bare?  And if so, what would happen, if it were glazed?


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"




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