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Looking for a red glaze like this one


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#1 Creo

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 06:21 AM

Hello, I wonder if you could kindly advise me again.

I am looking for a red glaze for stoneware that I fire at Cone 7 and 8 (but could fire at Cone 6 if required).

Have bought a load of red glazes and they are all either too brown, too orange, too glossy, or just nasty.

I am looking for a deeper red, more raspberry, that is matte or satin, such as the one shown in this screenshot from a Japanese Youtube vid......

Posted Image

Many thanks.

#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 07:15 AM

This is on porcelain at ^6 Ox. read the comments for recipe and instructions .
Not sure when you are working as your profile is blank. If you read Mastering Cone 6 Glazes by Ron Roy and John Hesselbeth, you can learned how to manipulate a glaze to get exactly what you want.

http://ceramicartsda...ewimage&img=765

Marcia

#3 Creo

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:03 AM

I'm in the UK, have updated my profile.

Thanks. Think this may be a bit too complex for me. Havent really got past the basics, and glaze mixing is on the advanced list at the moment!

Anything already prepared from a commercial supplier that might be similar?

#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:24 AM

I don't use prepared glazes , so I am unable to help you there..
Sorry. Thanks for updating your profile. It is nice to know you. I prefer helping people who
share a little about themselves.

Marcia

#5 oldlady

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 08:12 PM

because you are new, you are not aware that you are asking for the directions to walk up the last 100 feet of mt everest when you have only taken the first ten steps. red is an achievement that you will appreciate when you finally reach it. don't set impossible goals.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#6 Chantay

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 10:01 PM

because you are new, you are not aware that you are asking for the directions to walk up the last 100 feet of mt everest when you have only taken the first ten steps. red is an achievement that you will appreciate when you finally reach it. don't set impossible goals

This is such a true statement.
- chantay

#7 Creo

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 03:40 AM

because you are new, you are not aware that you are asking for the directions to walk up the last 100 feet of mt everest when you have only taken the first ten steps. red is an achievement that you will appreciate when you finally reach it. don't set impossible goals.


Why?
If you are going to post a negative response then please at least explain why.

#8 oldlady

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 09:09 AM

my reply isn't negative, it is just not what you want to hear. red is the most difficult color to get. that is a fact. even very experienced potters feel elated when they get a red they like. check all the literature you can find on the subject and you will discover what i say is true. or, stop wasting time trying to do this and get to work with the materials you have now so you can improve your skills to the level you need to mix a red glaze.

when people practice the piano, listeners know that much more practice will be needed before the piano player will be skilled enough for carnegie hall.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#9 Claypple

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 11:26 AM

I don't use prepared glazes


For my understanding, very few professional/educated potters do. I think I know why:
It gives you more control over what the glaze gonna look like. It is less expensive. What else?

#10 Nelly

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 12:28 PM


I don't use prepared glazes


For my understanding, very few professional/educated potters do. I think I know why:
It gives you more control over what the glaze gonna look like. It is less expensive. What else?


Dear All,

I would call myself a medium level potter. I too have always wanted a perfect red. I used to use something called "Rosie's Red" but now use something called "Saturated Iron" in my little studio.

Saturated iron is brownish. Not a true red or I would send you the recipe.

Ron Roy does have a recipe for a raspberry colored glaze in his book "Mastering Cone Six Glazes."

I know in speaking directly with Robin Hopper and asking about red glazes he said "you have to know your glaze chemistry."

I think, if my memory serves me correctly, I have heard it said that "red" is one of the most complex of colors to achieve. But again, I could be wrong.

Given that I do not want a lot of extra dust in my studio from open bags (due to the space in my garage), I simply order my recipes through my supplier. I send them the recipe and they simply make it up for me, I add water, sieve and I am done. Given my small operation, this works perfectly for me. Yes, it is more expensive but it suits my needs.

This is what I do and it works.

But do look at the Ron Roy book for his raspberry colored glaze. This may provide you with a start for the color you are trying to achieve.

Nelly

#11 perkolator

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 06:47 PM

i'd say those raspberry red glazes aren't very close to the type of red you're trying to achieve. usually those chrome/tin reds are more of a fuschia IMO, at least that's how mine have always come out. I use the Lana Wilson recipe or similar.

i would love to be able to find a nice copper red recipe since mine seldom come out the "chinese red" (vermillion red) that I've always associated with copper reds. it's always been my understanding that many of these red glaze recipes are held under lock and key so nobody else can replicate them since they are so elusive and require a reduction-firing genius to get them to turn out correctly or be burned off.

Anyone know what the company making Crate & Barrel's ceramics uses for their sweet orange-red glaze? I figure it's commercial. Have no idea how to achieve such a bright color like that, but would like to know!

#12 GEP

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 08:29 PM


I don't use prepared glazes


For my understanding, very few professional/educated potters do. I think I know why:
It gives you more control over what the glaze gonna look like. It is less expensive. What else?


Third reason .... you can have glazes that no one else has. This can be very important for a professional.
Mea Rhee
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#13 Wyndham

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:23 AM

Glazing is like painting a canvas. You can go to the paint store and by a paint the color you want, paint it on a wall and have a uniform blah color. Red, blue,green, it doesn't matter.

You can take those same colors and paint a canvas and have a wonderful landscape.

A uniform colored glaze is, to me, a painted wall. Now if there is movement, overlap,texture, then the landscape is starting to emerge.

That bowl is not red, if it were, it would be what attracted you to it.

Just a thought
Wyndham

#14 JBaymore

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:32 AM

Anyone know what the company making Crate & Barrel's ceramics uses for their sweet orange-red glaze? I figure it's commercial. Have no idea how to achieve such a bright color like that, but would like to know!


I have not seen the particular color you are mentioning here.... so a guess.... but if it is BRIGHT red based, these days likely it is encapsulated inclusion stains containing cadmium compounds.

best,

..............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#15 Sean0526

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:58 AM

my reply isn't negative, it is just not what you want to hear. red is the most difficult color to get. that is a fact. even very experienced potters feel elated when they get a red they like. check all the literature you can find on the subject and you will discover what i say is true. or, stop wasting time trying to do this and get to work with the materials you have now so you can improve your skills to the level you need to mix a red glaze.

when people practice the piano, listeners know that much more practice will be needed before the piano player will be skilled enough for carnegie hall.


No it isn't negative. This craft takes time to learn. We have to invest that time. In this age of "Let me just ask the people on the internet how to do this", which isn't always a bad thing, we often forget how complex some professions are. In defense of the internet I use it daily to find knowledge I know someone can help me with. But sometimes I run into answers like this. They're frustrating, but they send me right back to the studio to figure it out for myself.

I tell students almost daily "You will never be as proud of yourself as you will be when you've actually done the work yourself."

Back to looking for that red I see in my mind's eye...




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