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Hot item at today's show.......


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#1 Biglou13

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:17 PM

Just got back a local clay club show/ sale .. And the the hot item was....... Drumroll please............

Teacups.............

I sold many yunomi styled tea cups. :D

Was expecting rice bowls to be hot... From what others said......

From ive been reading you can never predict what's hot.
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#2 Mark C.

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 07:38 PM

The one thing I have learned in 40 years of shows is there is no predicting what will sell best.
Last weekend for me it was sponge holders and mugs .
Mark
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#3 Kohaku

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 08:45 PM

Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...
Not all who wander are lost

#4 trina

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:59 AM

Ya, I get that, I make these little turtle pots as souvenirs from my village. After doing different colour combos finally thought that the green and blue ones looked better then the purple/yellow ones and what do you know.....the purple ones sold out first so now I am left with a whack of green ones...T

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#5 Pres

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:07 AM

Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#6 oldlady

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 10:20 AM

what a good idea! i might make some like that for the next show in september. thanks
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#7 Kohaku

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 11:55 AM


Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads


<<revises thinking about not making any honey pots>>

Not all who wander are lost

#8 Mark C.

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 01:10 PM

My success at functional ceramics is to offer as many forms as I can at a show. I make about 40 forms now. When folks ask for something I do not make I will need about 50 or more requests to consider it as then when I do make that form another slower selling form drops off my list.
Honey post have always been on the make list but are never big sellers. I have seen less and less potters make them these days. I used to keep bees so I still use honey and make the pots.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#9 Pres

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 09:37 PM


Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads


The newer jars, last two years, have a thrown hollow bulb on the end instead of the reversed handle shape. I then cut part of the bulb so that it becomes a spoon. Works a little better.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#10 OffCenter

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 08:12 AM



Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads


The newer jars, last two years, have a thrown hollow bulb on the end instead of the reversed handle shape. I then cut part of the bulb so that it becomes a spoon. Works a little better.


I never thought of making a spoon that way. Got a picture?

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#11 Pres

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 01:21 PM




Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads


The newer jars, last two years, have a thrown hollow bulb on the end instead of the reversed handle shape. I then cut part of the bulb so that it becomes a spoon. Works a little better.


I never thought of making a spoon that way. Got a picture?

Jim


Sorry Jim, I don't off hand. However, consider throwing a tall thin goblet/chalice them, and instead of flaring the end, bulb it closing in completely. Then if you cut of one side of the bulb @1/3 of it you have a spoon for the honey. Some of these I have done to the opposite side of the opening, and put 1/4" hole to allow drizzling of the honey.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#12 OffCenter

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 02:13 PM





Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads


The newer jars, last two years, have a thrown hollow bulb on the end instead of the reversed handle shape. I then cut part of the bulb so that it becomes a spoon. Works a little better.


I never thought of making a spoon that way. Got a picture?

Jim


Sorry Jim, I don't off hand. However, consider throwing a tall thin goblet/chalice them, and instead of flaring the end, bulb it closing in completely. Then if you cut of one side of the bulb @1/3 of it you have a spoon for the honey. Some of these I have done to the opposite side of the opening, and put 1/4" hole to allow drizzling of the honey.


I will try that. Thanks very much for the tip.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#13 Pres

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 05:20 PM






Today I had five people ask for 'honey pots'.

Ignoring the obvious smart-arse potential, I figured out that they meant 'medium sized jars with an aperture in the lid'.

I had none. Nor do I plan to make any. Oh well...


Many years ago when I was still doing shows, I had several queries about honey jars. After listening for a few years, and also having a request for a gift for a local guy that had bees, I made some. Many of the comments would mention that they would misplace the spoon/dauber or that they used them on the porch and bees or ants would be attracted even when the lid was on. I made some with these thoughts in mind, and sold great numbers of them. Over the years they have changed, but this example is one of the first years-a reject.

Attached File  honeyJar.jpg   228.97KB   144 downloads


The newer jars, last two years, have a thrown hollow bulb on the end instead of the reversed handle shape. I then cut part of the bulb so that it becomes a spoon. Works a little better.


I never thought of making a spoon that way. Got a picture?

Jim


Sorry Jim, I don't off hand. However, consider throwing a tall thin goblet/chalice them, and instead of flaring the end, bulb it closing in completely. Then if you cut of one side of the bulb @1/3 of it you have a spoon for the honey. Some of these I have done to the opposite side of the opening, and put 1/4" hole to allow drizzling of the honey.


I will try that. Thanks very much for the tip.

Jim


You are welcome. I'll be in the studio this week, I'll try to do a few honey jars to show you.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#14 Pres

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:35 PM

Promised you a Honey Jar pic with the spoon, Jim.
Attached File  HoneyJar1.jpg   176.45KB   95 downloads

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#15 Min

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:30 PM

Hi Pres, what a terrific way to make honey jars! Very clever indeed. - Min

#16 OffCenter

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 07:25 AM

Promised you a Honey Jar pic with the spoon, Jim.
Attached File  HoneyJar1.jpg   176.45KB   95 downloads


Thanks, Pres! I was going to say, "What a terrific way to make honey jars! Very clever indeed," but Min has already said it.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#17 Benzine

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 12:40 PM

Promised you a Honey Jar pic with the spoon, Jim.
Attached File  HoneyJar1.jpg   176.45KB   95 downloads


That's awesome Pres. Do you make the lid separately, then attach the "Spoon"?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#18 Pres

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:40 PM


Promised you a Honey Jar pic with the spoon, Jim.
Attached File  HoneyJar1.jpg   176.45KB   95 downloads


That's awesome Pres. Do you make the lid separately, then attach the "Spoon"?


OK, I have been reluctant to highlight my process. . .I throw the pot, usually several, but if only one throw the lid and spoon first then the pot off the same ball of clay. After leather hard, . . . .I use my GG to trim the jar, put the lid in upside down and trim the lid, score while still on wheel, put on the uncut spoon with scoring and magic water, and while wheel turning clean up. Afterwards I cut the notch in the spoon. Lately I haven't been adding the drizzle hole-seems redundant.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#19 OffCenter

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 03:44 PM



Promised you a Honey Jar pic with the spoon, Jim.
Attached File  HoneyJar1.jpg   176.45KB   95 downloads


That's awesome Pres. Do you make the lid separately, then attach the "Spoon"?


OK, I have been reluctant to highlight my process. . .I throw the pot, usually several, but if only one throw the lid and spoon first then the pot off the same ball of clay. After leather hard, . . . .I use my GG to trim the jar, put the lid in upside down and trim the lid, score while still on wheel, put on the uncut spoon with scoring and magic water, and while wheel turning clean up. Afterwards I cut the notch in the spoon. Lately I haven't been adding the drizzle hole-seems redundant.


The way you make the spoon is clever but have you ever thought of making a clay honey dipper (the wooden thing with a knob on the end with ridges sort of like a cork screw)?

Jim (who is trying to ignore the mentioning of a GG!)
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#20 Pres

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 04:13 PM




Promised you a Honey Jar pic with the spoon, Jim.
Attached File  HoneyJar1.jpg   176.45KB   95 downloads


That's awesome Pres. Do you make the lid separately, then attach the "Spoon"?


OK, I have been reluctant to highlight my process. . .I throw the pot, usually several, but if only one throw the lid and spoon first then the pot off the same ball of clay. After leather hard, . . . .I use my GG to trim the jar, put the lid in upside down and trim the lid, score while still on wheel, put on the uncut spoon with scoring and magic water, and while wheel turning clean up. Afterwards I cut the notch in the spoon. Lately I haven't been adding the drizzle hole-seems redundant.


The way you make the spoon is clever but have you ever thought of making a clay honey dipper (the wooden thing with a knob on the end with ridges sort of like a cork screw)?

Jim (who is trying to ignore the mentioning of a GG!)


Yes I have considered that, however was not satisfied with the first ones I made. Then again to this was several years ago, and my throwing skills have changed, I may try it again. Most people have liked the spoons.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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