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Brittany

Prices and Expectations

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If a person were to sell their pottery, what would determine the price of the peice? I know some people who are interested in purchasing my ceramics, but I don't know what price I should make it as, considering that it is not professional work so it can't be too high, but I also want to make a profit.

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if you sell something it should be good. You should cover expenses plus your time...and experience...and training or learning.

f you read some of the comments about the technician job at the Clay Studio in Philadelphia, think about what you are worth.

 

Marcia

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If a person were to sell their pottery, what would determine the price of the peice? I know some people who are interested in purchasing my ceramics, but I don't know what price I should make it as, considering that it is not professional work so it can't be too high, but I also want to make a profit.

 

 

Don't be shy. Post pics in your profile gallery or here so we'll have some idea what you're talking about selling.

 

Jim

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Brittany, if you've just begun making pots a few months ago, at this point you should not be worried about turning a profit, or even covering expenses. Just charge what you think is fair. For now your main priority should be enjoying the process of learning. The pricing and profit issues are things you should examine much further down the road.

 

Mea

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In the meantime, if you're interested in learning about all the factors that go into pricing, we've had several good discussions about it:

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/topic/3940-i-have-a-big-problem/

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/topic/3040-pricing-artwork-to-sell/

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/topic/3010-what-is-your-time-worth/

 

 

.... among others. I only went back a few months to find these.

 

Mea

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Brittany;

I just came off a two day Mother's Day sale in my studio. We are a group of 10 artists-three potters, two glass artists, a few painters. I stood in my studio for 5 hours for two days, talking to people about my work, and also selling it. The pricing thing is very subjective. I raised my mug prices from $15.00 to $18.00. Pie dishes went for $50.00. Colanders[with holes in the bottom, and a saucer], were $65.00. Teapots sell for $75.00. I always have a few embarrassment bowls around for people that feel they must buy something to get out of my studio. They are $15.00. I never sell anything for less than $10.00.

Do not undersell yourself, and don't give stuff away. Look at other potters work and get a sense of what work sells for in your area. Set your prices comparable to your peers. We don't like newbies who undersell us, as this drives the market down.

Good luck. Welcome to the wonderful world of ceramics.

TJRcool.gif

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Brittany;

I just came off a two day Mother's Day sale in my studio. We are a group of 10 artists-three potters, two glass artists, a few painters. I stood in my studio for 5 hours for two days, talking to people about my work, and also selling it. The pricing thing is very subjective. I raised my mug prices from $15.00 to $18.00. Pie dishes went for $50.00. Colanders[with holes in the bottom, and a saucer], were $65.00. Teapots sell for $75.00. I always have a few embarrassment bowls around for people that feel they must buy something to get out of my studio. They are $15.00. I never sell anything for less than $10.00.

Do not undersell yourself, and don't give stuff away. Look at other potters work and get a sense of what work sells for in your area. Set your prices comparable to your peers. We don't like newbies who undersell us, as this drives the market down.

Good luck. Welcome to the wonderful world of ceramics.

TJRcool.gif

 

As TJR has said, get a good look at other potters work. Spring is a great time for that as many potters are now entering shows for Spring and Summer. Arts festivals, juried and non juried are a good start. Why both types? Most of the time the non juried will have your local hobbyist potters just starting out, or too timid to try for a bigger show. Sometimes you will have a good potter doing it, as a community thing. The juried shows will have potters from all over, and these will most often be high quality work, and be surrounded by other arts and crafts of high quality. In a non juried show, I often got lost between the plastic flowers and yard ornaments!

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Brittany;

I just came off a two day Mother's Day sale in my studio. We are a group of 10 artists-three potters, two glass artists, a few painters. I stood in my studio for 5 hours for two days, talking to people about my work, and also selling it. The pricing thing is very subjective. I raised my mug prices from $15.00 to $18.00. Pie dishes went for $50.00. Colanders[with holes in the bottom, and a saucer], were $65.00. Teapots sell for $75.00. I always have a few embarrassment bowls around for people that feel they must buy something to get out of my studio. They are $15.00. I never sell anything for less than $10.00.

Do not undersell yourself, and don't give stuff away. Look at other potters work and get a sense of what work sells for in your area. Set your prices comparable to your peers. We don't like newbies who undersell us, as this drives the market down.

Good luck. Welcome to the wonderful world of ceramics.

TJRcool.gif

 

As TJR has said, get a good look at other potters work. Spring is a great time for that as many potters are now entering shows for Spring and Summer. Arts festivals, juried and non juried are a good start. Why both types? Most of the time the non juried will have your local hobbyist potters just starting out, or too timid to try for a bigger show. Sometimes you will have a good potter doing it, as a community thing. The juried shows will have potters from all over, and these will most often be high quality work, and be surrounded by other arts and crafts of high quality. In a non juried show, I often got lost between the plastic flowers and yard ornaments!

Pres;

Don't forget the jams and jellies, and the guy pressing his own garlic!And you are in the next booth.

TJR.ohmy.gif

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What? I know that it's not that great,but someone wants to buy it.

 

Brittany, there really is no meaningful way for a stranger to price a specific pot for you. There are so many factors involved. As others have advised you here, you have to gain a whole lot of reference points before you can make meaningful pricing decisions. In the meantime, charge the amount that would make the sale worthwhile for you.

 

Mea

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What? I know that it's not that great,but someone wants to buy it.

 

 

Brittany, there really is no meaningful way for a stranger to price a specific pot for you. There are so many factors involved. As others have advised you here, you have to gain a whole lot of reference points before you can make meaningful pricing decisions. In the meantime, charge the amount that would make the sale worthwhile for you.

 

Mea

 

 

I think your teapot is whimsical and fun!

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What? I know that it's not that great,but someone wants to buy it.

 

 

Brittany, there really is no meaningful way for a stranger to price a specific pot for you. There are so many factors involved. As others have advised you here, you have to gain a whole lot of reference points before you can make meaningful pricing decisions. In the meantime, charge the amount that would make the sale worthwhile for you.

 

Mea

 

 

I think your teapot is whimsical and fun!

 

Thanks!

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What? I know that it's not that great,but someone wants to buy it.

 

 

Well that was an unfortunate post and I hope you didn't pay attention to it. Some folks get a rise out of picking on people online or have the audacity to think that only what they like is worthwhile which is not true of course. My 2 cents, I would never utter those words though. It is your work and some people will like it, some people will love it and some will simply not care for it and I wouldn't defend my work to someone so obviously out of line.

 

Like Gypsy I like the work. Hand building is something I admire and would like to spend some time experimenting with. How are you planning on glazing the set? Are you concentrating on tea sets? You know on pricing, if this is a friend you might just ask them what they had in mind and bargain from there. Hand built work generally cost more because it is often more involved but of course value and the time it takes to produce has a very loose connection in pottery.

 

You did say a mouthful though when you pointed out you have a buyer, nice quip :-)

 

Good luck and let us know what you ended up charging. Also be sure and post the finished glazed pieces, would love to see them.

GEP, skyvalley and gypsy like this

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I want to add that one should never judge their work by the fact that someone wants to buy it ...

Or does not want to buy it.

Big hairy deal either way!

Picasso could not sell at your local street fair yet little wooden bloomer kids for the garden go like hot cakes.

 

You should however judge your utilitarian work by its design and usefulness. Is it well made and pleasing to the eye? Is it well balanced when used? Do the lids fit well and compliment the entire design? Can you even use it? ( I worry about that upward pointing spout! ) You should strive to make wares that work well for your buyer.

 

This work looks to me like it is made by a new-ish potter who is stretching and trying to find her design style ...trying a lot of different things to see what works and what doesn't. This is what you are supposed to do when you are learning a new craft. Try everything that catches your eye. Every technique you see in the books. Fail, succeed ... Whatever ... Just keep trying stuff and having fun with the journey.

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I want to add that one should never judge their work by the fact that someone wants to buy it ...

Or does not want to buy it.

Big hairy deal either way!

Picasso could not sell at your local street fair yet little wooden bloomer kids for the garden go like hot cakes.

 

You should however judge your utilitarian work by its design and usefulness. Is it well made and pleasing to the eye? Is it well balanced when used? Do the lids fit well and compliment the entire design? Can you even use it? ( I worry about that upward pointing spout! ) You should strive to make wares that work well for your buyer.

 

This work looks to me like it is made by a new-ish potter who is stretching and trying to find her design style ...trying a lot of different things to see what works and what doesn't. This is what you are supposed to do when you are learning a new craft. Try everything that catches your eye. Every technique you see in the books. Fail, succeed ... Whatever ... Just keep trying stuff and having fun with the journey.

 

True, right now I'm still experimenting with the teapots and other other pieces that I am making. Thanks for pointing out the spout though, I do need to work on that.

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What? I know that it's not that great,but someone wants to buy it.

 

 

Well that was an unfortunate post and I hope you didn't pay attention to it. Some folks get a rise out of picking on people online or have the audacity to think that only what they like is worthwhile which is not true of course. My 2 cents, I would never utter those words though. It is your work and some people will like it, some people will love it and some will simply not care for it and I wouldn't defend my work to someone so obviously out of line.

 

Like Gypsy I like the work. Hand building is something I admire and would like to spend some time experimenting with. How are you planning on glazing the set? Are you concentrating on tea sets? You know on pricing, if this is a friend you might just ask them what they had in mind and bargain from there. Hand built work generally cost more because it is often more involved but of course value and the time it takes to produce has a very loose connection in pottery.

 

You did say a mouthful though when you pointed out you have a buyer, nice quip :-)

 

Good luck and let us know what you ended up charging. Also be sure and post the finished glazed pieces, would love to see them.

[/quote

I'm thinking of some bright colors that are almost like the velvet glazes ( am I saying that right?) That Amaco sells. First I just have to take the time out of my day to go get them, considering that I just have the basic glazes for beginners. And I do wish people would keep those sorts of opinions to themselves, especially since I'm new to this.

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>And I do wish people would keep those sorts of opinions to themselves, especially since I'm new to this.

 

Good luck with that!! ...she says with a smile.

Potters can be passionate about teapots, so if that is your love you better buckle up!

 

P.s. those spouts can be fixed with a sharp exacto knife before you fire.

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Thanks for posting, Brittney. In answer to your question, I have been where you are now and have watched other new potters struggling with the "when to sell, what to charge" question. Often, selling too early in your career can chage what you decide to make, and I have seennewbies loose track of their growth by tryinng to figure out what sells and then making that, instead of developing their new skills.

 

I like your pots and hope you make LOTS more of that item, each time you will learn more about how to make that item and what your style is going to be.

 

It's great that someone wants to buy this set, but remember, it's not a pot untill it's fired the last time, the glaze can change everything, and not always for the better.

Sell if you must, don't underprice the potters in your area, you will be glad to have their good will later, and it doesn't do you any favors either to price too low. You train your buyers as to what they will expect to get your work for.

 

Enjoy the trip, it can last a lifetime.

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