Jump to content


Photo

Very thick glace


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 claclana

claclana

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • LocationBuffalo, NY

Posted 08 January 2013 - 12:17 AM

how this awesome superthick glaze is achieved?
specially that gorgeous yellow bowl with white glaze big drips...
from the master Takuro Kuwata

Thank you for your help!

#2 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,319 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 08 January 2013 - 08:48 AM

Clayclana;
Looks like he's got one glaze underneath. The red in some cases, and blue in others. YoU apply that glaze to the bisque pot, let it dry, then apply a really thicK white that tends to crawl, like a Shino glaze. It helps if the first glaze is slightly shiny, then the top glaze pulls off.
Don't forget to make test tiles, and test,test,test.
TJR

#3 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,335 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:51 PM

Thanks for sharing this site.
Some look like thick dry lichen glazes which you can find recipes for ... but I have no idea how he does the thick, gluey looking ones.
I'm betting the firing schedule is interesting too.
( I love how one of the comments says it's an ill fitting glaze ... really? )

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#4 perkolator

perkolator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 340 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 08 January 2013 - 03:39 PM

i agree, looks like a thick crawl/lichen glaze or similar coating over a colored clay/slip/underglaze. i've never seen one that made such large crawl sections (truly depends on what size the cups actually are) but my guess is this is something that the artist has tested and tweaked a bunch to get the outcome he desires.

#5 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,319 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:45 PM

Thanks for sharing this site.
Some look like thick dry lichen glazes which you can find recipes for ... but I have no idea how he does the thick, gluey looking ones.
I'm betting the firing schedule is interesting too.
( I love how one of the comments says it's an ill fitting glaze ... really? )


Yeah Chris, I agree. The glaze doesn't fit very well!
TJR.:Psrc="http://ceramicartsda...lt/tongue.gif">

#6 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,597 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:23 PM

He must be applying the glaze very thick to get that type of surface crawl. In addition to the crawling, the satiny surface is especially interesting and nice.

#7 Brian Reed

Brian Reed

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 210 posts
  • LocationWashington State

Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:34 PM

I have done this by accident on a couple of pots. The crawling white glaze we call "Super Crackle" does this same thing when over a glaze and slightly overfired. The biggest issue was that the super crackle tends to be very sharp and you cannot handle the pots when they over fire like this. I threw them all into the garbage bin.
Brian Reed

Throwing down in Washington State

http://www.reedpottery.com

Northwest Clay Club

#8 claclana

claclana

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • LocationBuffalo, NY

Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:27 PM

hahah... Brian: it seem so true that ones garbage is a treasure for others! would LOVE to have one of those! not to use, just for the eyes... beauty is food for the soul
thank you all for the ideas!

#9 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,335 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:53 PM

I have done this by accident on a couple of pots. The crawling white glaze we call "Super Crackle" does this same thing when over a glaze and slightly overfired. The biggest issue was that the super crackle tends to be very sharp and you cannot handle the pots when they over fire like this. I threw them all into the garbage bin.


Yes, I thought that at first but if you look closely the edges are super smooth ... Also the underglaze colors are on the back of the peeled areas too which suggests a post glaze process or a later cooler firing that only melted the edges? Wierd but wonderful surfaces.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#10 SmartsyArtsy

SmartsyArtsy

    Chris Seminara

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • LocationPNW

Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:59 PM

One pot has a red glaze applied first but the white crackle over it has blue on its reverse. That's tricky

#11 Round2potter

Round2potter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • LocationPortland, Orygun

Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:05 AM

how would ya'll deal with the problem of glaze chips possibly taking out shelve and stilts?

Super heavy layer of wash?

Scrap bisque tiles under each cup/test series?

i want to do some tests on this! I am thinkin of a carbon trap shino over top a bisque-engobe or my favorite mat glaze
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#12 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,335 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:19 PM

I would throw a bunch of shallow saucer shapes to catch the glaze run off and buy yourself a grinder to clean the bottoms. Good Luck and post pictures when you get results ... good or bad.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#13 weeble

weeble

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • LocationOregon Coast

Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:20 PM

I'd be interested to actually FEEL that! I wonder if its actually a glaze or maybe something else applied after firing? I have worked with crawling glazes but never that thick, it looks like a lot of fun.
Maryjane Carlson

Whistling Fish Pottery

#14 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,319 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:45 AM

how would ya'll deal with the problem of glaze chips possibly taking out shelve and stilts?

Super heavy layer of wash?

Scrap bisque tiles under each cup/test series?

i want to do some tests on this! I am thinkin of a carbon trap shino over top a bisque-engobe or my favorite mat glaze


Make yourself some bisque tiles from the same clay body you are using for the bowls. Don't glaze all the way to the foot.
TJR.

#15 Round2potter

Round2potter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • LocationPortland, Orygun

Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:42 PM

Thanks all! i will be sure to post picturtes and my procedure later (also i'll get all my other tests put up too) as soon as the glaze firing schedule allows, For now i think i am gonna stick to simple glazes that i know crawl badly when thick, but i want to lower the flux a little and increase shrinkage (replace flint and flux with spar and i think wollastonite does the trick too, but maybe that works the other way......) i got books books books so it shouldnt be too hard!

Also i really dislike using a mason stain at all (lowfire sculpture ok, but not my wheel work). What is a good strong, stable colorant to start off with for the underglaze, my mind jumps to chrome or cobalt just due to their potency and regularity.

Cheers!

-Burt
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#16 mregecko

mregecko

    Potteries

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 154 posts
  • LocationBay Area, CA

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:56 PM

Are we sure that this is actually achieved with a glaze? I'm of the opinion it's a technique related to the form of the pot, not to heavy glaze crawl, etc.

Look at this image in particular. If this were a glaze crawl, the "back" sides of those peeling pieces would be the same white as the "front"... Instead they are the same red as the under-layer.

Makes me think that this is some elaborately thrown & hand-built work that is glazed very precisely and low fired, to achieve the illusion of heavy crawls.

I could also be very, very wrong. Posted Image

#17 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:45 PM

Are we sure that this is actually achieved with a glaze? I'm of the opinion it's a technique related to the form of the pot, not to heavy glaze crawl, etc.

Look at this image in particular. If this were a glaze crawl, the "back" sides of those peeling pieces would be the same white as the "front"... Instead they are the same red as the under-layer.

Makes me think that this is some elaborately thrown & hand-built work that is glazed very precisely and low fired, to achieve the illusion of heavy crawls.

I could also be very, very wrong. Posted Image

Interesting idea. Like maybe the pot was thrown, then waxed in some places, then covered with a thick porcelain slip that pulled away from the pot and was then manipulated. If the pot was dry before the slip was added, the slip would crack as it started to dry and pull away from the wax. The red color was obviously brushed on.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#18 weeble

weeble

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • LocationOregon Coast

Posted 12 January 2013 - 05:08 AM

See, I'm still wanting to touch, these COULD be done with something along the lines of a coating of wax or plastic after the firing! A layer of chalky red paint over the pot covered with a wax that shrinks, or ...?

I'm just saying, sort of in a devil's advocate way... I'm reasonably sure they ARE a cool funky glaze, but they don't HAVE to be....
Maryjane Carlson

Whistling Fish Pottery

#19 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 12 January 2013 - 05:34 AM

Actually the glaze looks like the 'Lamb's Fat' glaze or what TJ called 'Mutton Fat' glaze. The 'creamier' of the textures looks exactly like it.

The last time I saw the glaze it was in an issue of CM (years and years and years ago). The glaze flowed thickly and dripped over the rim. The translucency was almost like magnesia but thicker and white with a tinge of blue; fantastic.
John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#20 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,150 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 12 January 2013 - 12:00 PM

For crawling and bead glazes, increase additions of magnesium carbonate. Try incremental increases 2-3% and the crawling can eventually develop in raised beads.
Marcia




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users