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Round2potter

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About Round2potter

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 02/17/1992

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    Portland, Orygun
  1. send me your email and I will send you better pictures of that granite kiln. I has hundreds of pics of fire boxes and kilns throughout Spain from 30 years ago. I just got Graphics converter but when transposed it downsized from 40k to 9k. Marcia

  2. To anybody who thinks this is REAL. IT IS! i heard that a newish penny would do this and sent one through an 04 glaze fire with almost the exact same result! I did not however put a glaze in it. And Maria, Try splittling the now fired penny into layers! I dropped mine and it split yielding a really shinny and glittery spiral pattern thing. Super cool!!! - Burt
  3. Dear John, Thanks for the math on that! although i love to fiddle with glazes, converting % and weight and balancing stuff is a headache for me, not that i cant do it. I know it is expensive, its gold, i just want to make enough (~50 grams) glaze for test tile or 2. if its 10 bucks for 1 kg it'd be like 50 cents for my tests; i dont know about you but 50 cents seems worth it to me. I know a science teacher too, so maybe i could buy only a very small amount from the school or through the school too.... we are already talking about making glazes/glass in his freshmen chemistry class
  4. Ok Upon looking more into stuff written on glassware/jewelery Silver should be reddish orange to blue depending on RDX and gold SHOULD be red in both RDX and OX. I still have no starting percentage, so i will probably do like 1/4%-1% in 1/4% increments. or just start low and see, maybe i wont have to waste any more Au or Ag than needed. NOW. The real question is what is the best (by best i mean cheapest) form of these metals that i can use. Thanks all you have been a wealth of places to look. And in answer to Ag, Au vs. Cu; i love copper, and copper red, i want to s
  5. i am not sure why its sideways...... its not on my computer when i open the file.......
  6. Oh i read John Britts book long ago, it is a go to for me when i am doing tests. As for the chemistry, i think i have a good enough grip on it all, i am a super nerdy geochemistry student. And NO I AM NOT GOING TO MELT COINS, silver carbonate and goldoxides look apealing. The Coinage Metals is a common name for the column in the periodic table including, copper, silver, gold and roentgenium. And i am also aware they are used for lusters, but seriousey nobody has used them at stoneware temp? I guess they will go orange or red, which is what i want. Are they going to volati
  7. Oh i read John Britts book long ago, it is a go to for me when i am doing tests. As for the chemistry, i think i have a good enough grip on it all, i am a super nerdy geochemistry student. And NO I AM NOT GOING TO MELT COINS, silver carbonate and goldoxides look apealing. The Coinage Metals is a common name for the column in the periodic table including, copper, silver, gold and roentgenium. And i am also aware they are used for lusters, but seriousey nobody has used them at stoneware temp? I guess they will go orange or red, which is what i want. Are they going to volati
  8. Dear all, I have been mixing glazes and modifying them for about a year now and i am very curious about the Coinage Metals as colorants. I know that Gold is used in cranberry glass and i have seen glassblowers "gas" a peice with silver for a blue color. What colors can i get from these metals in feldspathic glazes? I am more interested in silver as i can get it readily without totally breaking the bank on just a small test batch of glaze. I have soooo many books on glazes, some new, mostly old classics, and none of them mention these pricey metals in any glazes. I was going
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