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Ways to get glaze to stick to already fired pieces?


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#1 clay lover

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 07:47 AM

I have the misfortune to have quite a few small cylinder shaped pieces with glaze much too thin, and the color is WAY too dark. The glaze is fairly new to me. the first 2 firings of it went great, then I did not use it for a while, was in a hurry and didn't pay atention to the dip thickness. I am being properly dicipllined for glazing 'in a hury'. I know!

I tried dipping again, got a very thin layer on and refired a few, with little improvement. I have heard of tricks to get 2nd glaze to stick, using spray starch? heating with heat gun, that sounds very time consuming. I have about 30 of these little buggers, they sell well with the right look, I would love to save them.

What's your best trick to get glaze to stick on already fired pieces?

#2 Denice

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 09:15 AM

I would stick them in the oven and warm them up not so hot you can't handle them. I have a small toaster broiler I sometimes take out to my shop to use, it sounds like you have enough to fill the oven and take a tray of them at a time. Denice

#3 Ben

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 09:46 AM

How long to make new ones vs how long to reglaze (and with questionable reglazing results)?

I say make new pieces.
That being said, in dishware industry they fire pots to maturity, smooth the surfaces in a vibratory "tumbler", then heat and spray the glaze on. They could be using some sort of adhesive in the glaze too. No way to know that.
It may be do able and here's how I'd try it.
I'd use my kiln to preheat. It is larger and once hot will hold the heat. Get em hot. Above the boiling point of water (300f) and try spraying the glaze. May take 2 or more coats.

Sounds like too much trouble to me. I'd still just remake them.

#4 perkolator

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 12:50 PM

things to try:
- heat the object up before glazing either in a kiln/oven or with an external heat source - heat gun, blow dryer, heater, etc.
- add thick CMC solution to glaze to help stick and keep from flaking off
- corn syrup trick -- apply corn syrup to piece, then glaze - the syrup makes it tacky and glaze will stick better.
- spray the glaze on

#5 kathi

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:31 PM

You can add corn syrup directly to the glaze.

#6 Pres

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 09:34 AM

You can add corn syrup directly to the glaze.


Remember that adding anything organic to a glaze puts it in the perishable category-at least as far as growing mold, and smells are concerned.

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#7 Wendey

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 11:24 AM

Paint on Elmer's type glue and let it dry, spray starch and my favorite is hair spray cuz it dries quickly and works beautifully if you spray.
"There's fun to be done." Dr. Seuss

#8 oldlady

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 02:19 PM

thanks for the hair spray tip!!!

i use hair spray to remove the names i have put on plastic containers. i use a Sharpie to label everything so i do not mix up all those whitish tubs of glaze tests and hair spray and a cotton ball gets everything clean again. sometimes there is a faint "ghost" of the old label.
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#9 kathi

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 02:35 PM


You can add corn syrup directly to the glaze.


Remember that adding anything organic to a glaze puts it in the perishable category-at least as far as growing mold, and smells are concerned.



Yes...very important. I make just the amount I plan to use that day.

#10 clay lover

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 04:37 PM



You can add corn syrup directly to the glaze.


Remember that adding anything organic to a glaze puts it in the perishable category-at least as far as growing mold, and smells are concerned.



Yes...very important. I make just the amount I plan to use that day.


Thanks so much. In a quart of liquid glaze, do you have a sort of right amount ot suggest, I have NO idea.

#11 yedrow

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 01:29 AM

Wow, some great ideas here!!!

Joel.

#12 scoobydoozie

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 08:29 AM

My tried and true way to paint over fired glaze is APT II cermic enfhancer or APT II NRG. Just a couple drops added to the glaze and it sticks like molasses! Awesome stuff with multiple uses. I'm never without it.

http://www.apt2produ...laze.html<br />http://www.apt2produ...com/ceramic.htm
http://www.apt2produ...m/porcelain.htm

#13 Denice

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 09:20 AM

Scooby thanks for the information on apt II, I think I'll give it a try. I have been doing a lot of glaze testing, and one of my test is comparing the difference in the layering of glazes. One tile has the glazes layered and fired once the other tile has the same glazes but is fired between layers, interesting results. If I decided to use some of these this product will make it easier than heating the pieces up. Denice




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