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As Mark has said, potter's choice about what to use or not. Myself, I have decided against anything in the shop that will have severe consequences for my own health. I know that my shop has a major hazard in dust, from silica. I do what I can, to keep that from getting too bad. At the same time I keep away from barium, lead, uranium, some other materials. Yes I use cobalt, chromium, and copper as coloring agents, and keep them in enclosed containers in a closed wall cabinet, carefully weighing them when mixing materials.

Some may find interesting that in the 70's ran a Geiger counter through the Jewelry & Metal-craft studio and found several pounds of copper enameling enamels that were kicking the scale of the meter off the chart. These were commercially purchased in our regular purchase orders from reputable companies. Then the big materials safety in the studios hit, and there were major changes by manufacturers in what they used for coloring enamels, and what I got in the way of commercial glazes. Oversight is important at times, and guidelines do help us to make better decisions.

best,

Pres

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Another thing that I learned long ago, and have seen it done otherwise. . . .mix you glazes wet! Saw a grad student one time gong nuts with a paint blender . . . dry, no mask. She said it was ok since it was outside! I always add enough water to just cover the mix, then use the drill mixer slowly to start, add more water, strain twice.

 

best,

Pres

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yes, I slide the glaze ingredients into bucket already partially filled with known quantity of water.if bentonite is going in it is mixed with another ingredient prior to adding. Left to slake then sieved next day ideally.

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One of my favorite potters, Larry Allen, does some amazing work with intense red glazes on stoneware in oxidation. According to his website, the stoneware is fired to full maturity, then the red glaze is applied in a separate step and refired to earthenware temps.

https://www.la-pottery.com/main.sc

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wow, wonder how he gets that to adhere.

This wouldn't nullify the possibility of a leaching occurring if the glaze is not a stable one?

His placement of colour makes this a bit irrelevant.

Maybe he has a glaze thickener....

Beautiful stuff

Edited by Babs
errors

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On 6/24/2018 at 3:56 PM, Babs said:

wow, wonder how he gets that to adhere.

This wouldn't nullify the possibility of a leaching occurring if the glaze is not a stable one?

His placement of colour makes this a bit irrelevant.

Maybe he has a glaze thickener....

Beautiful stuff

Looks like a standard ^06 Christmas Red brush-on over a dark slip or engobe or underglaze, maybe pre-heated. Perfectly okay if it's not touching food or lip surfaces. And quite a pop. 

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I think it up to us as individuals asa to what risk level we want to work with as long as we do not allow the public to be exposed to hazards as they do not know any better. I tend to work with a few not great  items (like barium and manganese )but I do so knowing the risk to myself  and take precautions and the end product cannot hurt the public. I make all my own glazes so I have a responsibility along with that that I take seriously .

 

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