Jump to content
bobtiki

How Would I Make This… Stamp? Medallion?

Recommended Posts

Hey there. I'm new to ceramics, but I'm getting into it quickly. I looked around on the forums for this question, but I didn't see exactly what I was looking for. (Maybe I just didn't know the right name.)

 

I'm trying to make something on my mugs much like the graphic detail on this Maryland Renaissance Festival mug. It's raised, smoothed into the mug surface on the outside, but has very fine detail on the inside:

 

post-86606-0-93588000-1499974444_thumb.jpg post-86606-0-76254700-1499974483_thumb.jpg

 

What is this sort of element called, and can you point me to info on how one might go about adding such a detail to a piece?

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The decoration on the mug looks like a type of sprig. Sprigging is the addition of a stamped or modeled object on to a pot. This could have been done with a rubber stamp, a plaster bar relief mold or some other basically flat image. The stamped piece is then added to the pot using slip between the two piece of cheese to leather hard clay. All before drying, and firing. Careful glazing is needed to make certain that the sprig is not obscured with the glaze. This includes the type of glaze, the thickness of glaze and the application of the glaze.

 

best,

Pres

bobtiki and Davidpotter like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The graphic/impression was most likely made with a wooden or metal stamp. It may be a sprig like Pres said or it ma have been stamped directly into the surface of the pot. I think it would be less work (after some trial and error) to stamp the pot directly. There are a number of companies that will make a stamp from a graphic. A quick online search will give you a number of companies and their pricing. You can also try an office supply store. If they offer customized rubber stamps, I assume that would work too. If I was trying to replicate the photo I would throw the pot, stamp it, apply underglaze or stain wash to the logo, wipe away the high areas of underglaze with a sponge, bisque it, wax the stamped area, then dip the entire pot in glaze.

bobtiki likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So research indicates this mug was made by Grey Fox Pottery, which specializes in this kind of thing.  They're vague about their process... saying that the design is applied with a scrimshaw technique, similar to how sailors engraved on bone.  They *imply* that the artist is engraving on every single cup, but that would be prohibitively expensive for such a detailed design, I'd think. 

 

Ah, here ya go... a video showing parts of their process.  It's a sprig.

 

Marcia Selsor and bobtiki like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to make the sprig(stamp)

This is something that you can do yourself-

My studio assistant has made many dealing with bicycle subjects. They photos are posted on an old thread here.

anyway-you can make the original  out of clay or wood or metal and take a plaster cast of it and turn it into a press mold.I made her a cutout stamp that mimics gears in circle and then she presses that into a round plaster press mold of the image she wants.

 

That video shows enough of the process to get the idea.

I have few tips on glazing -you a small squeeze bottle with a micro tip for your glaze or stain and fill only the groves as best you can -let dry then wipe off the area so only the groves are filled. The video does not show this part.

After that you can wax the emblem and now glaze the pot so that glaze is not on the raised emblem.

I also suggest keep the deign simple -it will stand out better.

bobtiki likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make mugs with sprigs for a local business.  I have started using rubber latex on the sprig before glazing.   It works better for me than regular wax.  The stamp I use makes a fairly deep impression. 

 

Roberta

bobtiki likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it interesting that no waxing over the black inlay was done, just  glaze dipped over and then ...sanded?.. off.  It would be difficult for me to sand, or remove the overglaze, that perfectly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, clay lover said:

I thought it interesting that no waxing over the black inlay was done, just  glaze dipped over and then ...sanded?.. off.  It would be difficult for me to sand, or remove the overglaze, that perfectly.

It's all about the shape of the logo and the amount of pressure you use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×