Jump to content
Pres

Pottery Knowledge Quiz Of The Week(Pkqw): Week 2

Recommended Posts

Here you go with week 2. These have been proof read 3 times! At the same time, many of you will find these quite easy. Have fun.

 

 

Week 2

  1. A ________________ is often considered to be the peak of the development of pot gauges as it allows the potter to measure multiple widths and depths of a series of pots using the same dimensions thus duplicating the form.

    a. butterfly

    b. bumblebee

    c. dragonfly

    d. caliper

  2. ________________ are tools for lifting pots off of the potters wheel. The Japanese made theirs out of bamboo, and the process looks awkward to me, but then a culture that developed the chopstick for eating may find them easy. Others I have seem made of wood, metal and plastic, the material does not really matter only the efficiency. I personally don't often use them.

    a. cradles

    b. carriages

    c. handlers

    d. calipers

  3. A useful decorating tool that can be used to decorate greenware, slip covered greenware, or freshly glazed bisqueware is the ________________. It is a quick and easy way to create a pattern of parallel 2 or more lines on the pot. Hand made tools of this sort allow for a variety of lines of different spacing and depth. I use them when throwing on cylinders before shaping.

    a. needle tools

    b. fluting tools

    c. stamps

    d. combs

  4. Tools that allow for a series of parallel lines on a pot that appear to be similar to the tool in question 3 but are more of a deep incised process are __________ tools. This technique is very dependent on the form of the pot and the strength of the technique is in the rhythm and repetition of the process.

    a. needle tools

    b. fluting tools

    c. stamps

    d. combs

 

This weeks questions were taken from text in Handmade Potter's Tools, Wilford & Wong, Kodansha International, C-1986.

 

 

best,

Pres

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

feet first jump,

 

Q1 - d - caliper

Q2 - none of the above, your hands. or those horrible metal lifters that mess up your pots which might have been called cradles or carriages back in 86, don’t know, wasn't making pots back then

Q3 - d - combs

Q4 - b - fluting tools

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Min you are a newbie-not making pots in 1986 you say.

 

D-caliper

A -cradle

D-Comb

B-Fluting 

 

LOL, sure call me a newbie, always will be trying to figure this stuff out. psst, I think we both learned a different word for the answer Pres is looking for to the first question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Min 

I never asked but what where you doing when you lived in The Queen Charlottes? I ask this out of curiosity since I have been there. I chartered a dive boat for a week in the 90's  after doping my Anacortes  art show and dove the inside areas taking underwater photos-Flew into Sandspit and spent a night in small town on other Island before getting aboard the vessel. The world heritage site was really cool. Also the small hot springs nearby was a hit with us cold water divers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Min 

I never asked but what where you doing when you lived in The Queen Charlottes? I ask this out of curiosity since I have been there. I chartered a dive boat for a week in the 90's  after doping my Anacortes  art show and dove the inside areas taking underwater photos-Flew into Sandspit and spent a night in small town on other Island before getting aboard the vessel. The world heritage site was really cool. Also the small hot springs nearby was a hit with us cold water divers.

 

sent you a pm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to say it, but it really doesn't look like too many of you are all the way there yet. Close, but only one with their ducks in a row.

 

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I  am still learning to throw, so I will go with.

 

1. calipers.

2. whatchamacallit

3. thingamabob

4. scratchy lines thingy

 

Nerd

 

** Pm me when we get back to clay and glaze chemistry.

LeeU likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually Pres, I have to learn this side of the equation too. However, I must admit that I find a perfectly formulated porcelain body more stimulating than a perfectly thrown vase.

Nerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nerd the ingredients are just a bunch of materials without the pot at the end. Its the pots that makes it a functional item.

Hard to put flowers in a pile of epk and have them last.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A different view is that the pile of finely crushed rocks (kaolinite, feldslpar, and quartz) will transform the flowers into dry clay-like items that will last years longer than the wet version.  [Powdered porcelain is an excellent medium for absorbing water].
 
Functionality is only constrained by the point(s) of view of the observer.
 
LT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get that ceramic flowers last a lifetime or dry flowers last until the dust covers them or plastic ones last until brittle-but I'm speaking as a fresh flower lover in this point of view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I chose this particular book to illustrate much of what I have found in my own work. You can buy tools others make, and make them work. . . or not. Yet not all of the time will they do exactly what you want them to do for the specific job you task them for. However, if you know a little about tool making, then you can make the tool specifically for what you are trying to task the tool for. At the same time isn't it a good thing to be able to look for the cows tongue, knowing the name for a specific shape, rather than having to look through picture after picture trying to find a tool that you know you want, but don't know the name for it. So many tools out there, all sorts of ribs, all sorts of trimming tools and modelling tools. Yet how many know the difference in the use between a wire end tool and a ribbon end tool? Or have we come to where we don't even care?

 

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×