Jump to content

Recommended Posts

JBaymore    1,432

Here  are porcelain artists whose work I find very successful.   kato-san is very materialistic in his approach to what happens to clay and glass in fire.  Fukami-san's has a bit of a "fire and ice" quality about it that is less "warm" than what I try to achieve.  Very powerful forms.

 

FUKAMI Sueharu 深見陶治

 

http://www.360doc.com/content/14/0210/18/699582_351415218.shtml

 

And another:

 

KATO Tsubusa 加藤委

 

http://www.gallerytosei.com/list/kts/kts.html

 

http://toku-art.seesaa.net/category/4128954-1.html

 

best,

 

.....................john

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I count porcelain as more of a glaze you can throw rather than a clay that vitrifies.

 

I have tried once or twice and thought how horrible it was. Like when I drink a cup of tea and I am sad it's not coffee....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neilestrick    1,379

Porcelain is unique among clay bodies. The lack of plasticity, almost a rubberiness, is terribly appealing once you get used to it. I would rather throw porcelain than stoneware any day, and actually find it easier to throw now. It was a difficult transition, though. I was a good stoneware thrower, but porcelain kicked my butt at first. I switched to porcelain because I wanted the whiteness, but it took me months and months to get used to it. I had to let it dry out until it was really stiff in order to successfully use it. I've been working with it for about 13 years now, so I've figured out what I can and can't do with it. I no longer worry about water- I drench it but work quickly. I don't baby the drying at all- after it's trimmed I just leave it out to dry. I find that drying speed after trimming is a non-issue if you make the walls even. I take a little more care from wet to leather hard, though, as the lip will dry very quickly. It's difficult to get things dry enough to trim in one day like I can do with stoneware. I also don't baby the firings at all. I often bisque my pieces on 'Fast Glaze', which is a 4.5 hour firing. Anything under 4 pounds can handle the fast firing just fine. I prefer to pull handles right on the pot, but I can't do it with porcelain. Instead, I pull them on a bisqued piece, then let it stiffen up and transfer it to the real pot. Once they're attached I can put them in the kiln and dry them out quickly if needed.

 

My students often ask me if they're 'ready' for porcelain, because they feel like they have to use it, like they're expected to 'move up' from stoneware. This attitude goes for moving from brown or buff stoneware to smooth white stoneware, too. I'm all for trying different clay bodies for the sake of expanding one's experience, but I stress to them that there's nothing wrong with using the groggy brown clay. It's all good stuff, just different. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
juliad76    2

Hello I only work with bone china if any one wants any info on this please just ask and I will do my best to answer any questions if you have any that is, I am fascinated by all the other clays but with only a small studio we cant have any contamination, the main items we make are horses and lampshade but have made all sorts of other items both large and small all of course are slip cast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
glazenerd    816

Juliad:

 

You can contact me via the PM messaging. Always interested in learning new things about clay/s.

 

Nerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chilly    329

Not yet.  Planning to buy a bag to make some extruded shapes for potter's camp this summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark C.    1,797

Since this is a thread about white gold I figured that if anyone had some of that other gold colored gold that you could just mail it to me and I could dispose of it properly.

just click my link at bottom of page for address to sent that old gold stuff to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×