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Stool/chair Height?

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I should have expected that :lol:

 

At the HS where we took a class I didn't have any problems. Lately with the Skimp or Baileys my back hasn't been happy when throwing. Maybe I'll try a lower chair to keep my back straighter. 

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After siting on a stool and always having a backache afterward, I now use an office chair without arms in my studio.  This allows me hours of time with no discomfort at all.  I can adjust the height should I ever need to and the back rest is very comfortable.  

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I think that a variable height stool really works best. My reasoning for this is for the many different positions you might find yourself in when throwing. If you throw off the hump, you may be more comfortable with a higher seat, but as the clay gets lower, you find you are bending over too much. Trimming may require different heights, I don't like to get my arms too far past perpendicular to the wheel at the level of the pot bottom. So think about the types of chairs that would give you multiple heights. One of my favorites is:

 

31xxihjs2gl.jpg

This type of stool allows variable height, and the angle of the stool actually supports your body and pushes you slightly forward.

 

best,

Pres

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Most of my Brent wheels are raised 4" (4x4) and most of the Shimpo wheels are raised 1.5" (2x4). This has been what is comfortable for the majority of my students.

 

What is comfortable for me: sitting at the wheel (with my left foot on a 3" height from two 2x4s) and my left elbow on my thigh I should be able to put my hand on the wheel head and have my forearm just a little above the whee head. If the forearm is hitting, it will give me rug burn. If I am too high up my wrist will hurt.

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I made two after Pietro's design for the classroom at La meridiana. The lid of the storage bin sits flat on one side and turned around it is supported at an angle. The bottom has two leg panels to raise the height.

I'd make them wider next time.

Marcia

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post-1954-0-74251200-1479994656_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-57849200-1479994640_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-74251200-1479994656_thumb.jpg

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I suggest raising the wheel about 2-4 inches.Especially if you are tall.

 

I had considered this since I'm pretty tall at 5'6" 

 

 

What is comfortable for me: sitting at the wheel (with my left foot on a 3" height from two 2x4s) and my left elbow on my thigh I should be able to put my hand on the wheel head and have my forearm just a little above the whee head. If the forearm is hitting, it will give me rug burn. If I am too high up my wrist will hurt.

 

Right now I'm using both a 2x4 and a 1x4 to raise my left foot.

 

The suggested rule of thumb for wood lathe is the spindle the same height as your elbow so I can relate to your suggestions about elbow and forearm height. Something to work on after today's holiday.

 

Thanks All

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just something else to consider

 

http://www.plumtreepottery.com/articles/DownTheSC.pdf

 

https://kiefferceramics.com/2008/03/11/throwing-standing/

 

i have tried both. standing at a friend's wheel and sitting in school where i do most of my throwing. really standing with a mirror is what really helps out my upper shoulders esp. i now sleep on the floor on carpet with no mattress to help my back. 

 

however i am the kind of person who prefers standing up. i stand to cut vegetables, i stand to paint and draw.

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Thanks for the articles preeta

 

In my younger days I would be on my feet 12-14 hours a day. People would tease me that I never sat. Life happens and I'm only on my feet maybe 4 hours a day, tops.  I love to cook too and spend a minimum of an hour a day doing that.

 

Standing while turning is something I will now look into.

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That is a pretty famous article by Glick. As Glick says, lumbar support is important if you are sitting. Standing is another matter. My Bailey wheel has leg extensions and I can adjust them to a standing height if needed. My stools also adjust. You just need to find what works best for you and how you make whatever it is you are making.

 

Marcia

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For those of us who spend a lot of time at the wheel, throwing while standing does seem like a better option healthwise. More and more evidence of prolonged sitting not being very good. I know most people who throw get up and move around but I don't think that adds up to the same as standing while throwing. 

 

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/sitting/faq-20058005

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I raised the Baileys 3". and placed an adjustable office chair for both wheels, Much better, I didn't get a chance to throw today because of company , at least I'm all set up for tomorrow..

 

I'm aware of the health problems of too much sitting, I'm going to check out the extension legs. I might be able to turn a set or two., thanks.

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I've been thinking about standing and I can't help but wondering.

 

Will I be dancing with the wheel when I'm centering?

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Standing wheel is OK, if you are throwing smaller, but when that cylinder gets up to 20", the sitting wheel where you can stand to pull is a better option. This allows you to get straight down into the cylinder without having to distort your elbows and wrists to fit the cylinder. I often will stand to make pulls on cylinders as the arm length works easier when straight, thus not rubbing the sides from the angled arm. extra water on the forearm helps also.

 

 

best,

Pres

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On 11/23/2016 at 2:52 PM, Pres said:

I think that a variable height stool really works best. My reasoning for this is for the many different positions you might find yourself in when throwing. If you throw off the hump, you may be more comfortable with a higher seat, but as the clay gets lower, you find you are bending over too much. Trimming may require different heights, I don't like to get my arms too far past perpendicular to the wheel at the level of the pot bottom. So think about the types of chairs that would give you multiple heights. One of my favorites is:

 

31xxihjs2gl.jpg

This type of stool allows variable height, and the angle of the stool actually supports your body and pushes you slightly forward.

 

best,

Pres

I have 3 of these and Pres is right, chair height is important I’m constantly adjusting the chair height depending on what operation. I like the chair high centering  for better leverage then will adjust to a lower setting throwing so its easier to watch how the clay responds to my touch and trimming I’m usually sitting low again for me personally I can have more control and can better see the tool working.

Edited by 1515art

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