Jump to content

Recommended Posts

AndreaB    23

I'm in a bit of a quandary regarding saggar firing.  I'd really love to try it, but here's the thing. From what I've read on internet saggar can't be used on functional ware. I've thrown a tall lidded pot and a bud vase/oil holder and I think they both would look really great with the effects of saggar.  My question is - having been thrown in stoneware, bisqued to 960 deg C, how would glazing on the inside be affected by saggar firing.  I know if I leave unglazed the pot can be used to store spaghetti etc ie. non porous items but the oil pot would not be food safe. If I glaze with earthenware glaze and fire to about 1100 (electric kiln) what's the possibility of the saggar affecting the inside? (my idea is to glaze and saggar fire at the same time)

 

Or should I glaze fire with stoneware glaze to 1200 first?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Thanks 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

I agree that saggar firing is not meant for food. The effects of saggar firing work well if the clay is porous enough to absorb fumes and smoke from the firing. I have seen some innovative functional ware using saggars ..urns, lamp shades, murals, sculpture. Check out some of my saggar firing friends: Judy Motzkin and Linda and Charlie Riggs

http://motzkin.com , http://www.cclay.com/criggs/

 

riggs pottery and clay art studio videos

and my own (shameless self promotion)  http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com/saggar-fired-pottery-gallery.html

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/album/824-recent-pieces-in-october/

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rex Johnson    47

I've been trying to solve this question (in my head)  for a while. The saggar effects are coming along well, though I tell buyers that they are earthenware, not terribly sturdy, usable as decoration or vases and planters.

It would be nice to have a finish inside certain forms, but in the end, they're still not useful in a utilitarian sense.

My advice would be to try it. Do your glaze and then saggar the piece(s).

What's the worse that can happen?

Let us know what you find out....it could be a good thing. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Marcia Selsor    1,301

The terra sig finish that absorbs the colors of saggar chemicals will not be porous enough if you glaze the piece to ^04 or even06. Go ahead and try it, Please post the results.Please include some of your recent pieces without glaze so we can compare.

 

 

One thing you can do it seal the inside after firing with a sodium silicate solution like that used on dry flies for fishing. I think even deck sealant would work. Then you could have a vase that holds water.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pentapus    0

I wanted to raise this post back from the dead instead of starting a new thread (I tried to find an answer online and by searching the boards).

 

I am searching for a method to use the smoke/carbon capture of a saggar fire on functional food-safe items like cups.

 

My plan is to bisque fire my white stoneware first then use a saggar in a separate firing (probably only to 1500 degrees). I would then fire the cup again to a full cone 6.

 

My concern is that the cups will leach the carbon/ash during use with tea or spirits.

 

Would "sealing" the results of the saggar firing with a clear glaze and then firing to cone 6 solve this potential issue?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Min    781

I wanted to raise this post back from the dead instead of starting a new thread (I tried to find an answer online and by searching the boards).

 

I am searching for a method to use the smoke/carbon capture of a saggar fire on functional food-safe items like cups.

 

My plan is to bisque fire my white stoneware first then use a saggar in a separate firing (probably only to 1500 degrees). I would then fire the cup again to a full cone 6.

 

My concern is that the cups will leach the carbon/ash during use with tea or spirits.

 

Would "sealing" the results of the saggar firing with a clear glaze and then firing to cone 6 solve this potential issue?

 

Hi Pentapus and welcome,

 

Any carbon will burn off when you fire again to cone 6. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pentapus    0

Thank you Min, and I appreciate the welcome.

 

I have some low fire cone 05 glazes to try out. Maybe that's still hot enough to burn out the carbon but I'll keep playing around.

 

I'm stuck on the look/feel of pit and saggar fired clay. The commercial glazes I have access to feel too controlled, like there isnt enough room for surprises.

If anyone has any suggestions on how to get the spontaneity of smoke and fire in dinnerware safe pieces I'd love to keep researching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×