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Black Colorant?

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I recently saw a pot with vertical black and white stripes up the sides......the black was a pure black....no blurring, no running, crisp edges. . Anyone have any idea how this is achieved? It was a white glaze.  I was wondering if it was black stain applied to the surface.  Any ideas would me most appreciated. 

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So...black and white underglaze stripes with a clear over the top....it didn't have that look but I will try it....it almost looked like black and white glazes side by side....but there was no blending of the two together. Can you use a stain like an oxide if you have the right glaze? There was another pot he used it on where he had clearly drawn lines over a glaze that were black,,,but again no blurring or running.  I wish I could copy it and post it. 

Here is the url.....it is the lid of the box. He had a vase where it was vertical stripes on the neck. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tcbcO_vwdQ&t=24s

It is right at the beginning of the video....sometimes for some reason....it gets cut out. There is another brown box....it's not that one. 

 

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The video in the URL starts with a still photo of a lidded box with a black and white top and red chattered sides. I didn't see the vase. The top of the box lid was a slab, textured with a roller, shaped, and then applied to the top of the open thrown cylinder. The glaze on the top of the lid looks to me like a temoku type of dark transparent glaze that breaks clear over the edges of texture,

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23 minutes ago, jrgpots said:

could the top be Bernards slip applied to the top followed by carving  prior to bisque firing.  A celadon glaze then applied after firing?

Jed   I was wondering if it was some kind of stain....that would be consistent with this artist's work.....he is very meticulous

Thank you both, I should have been more clear....the vase was not in the video.  The box is lined with a green celadon.  Somehow that video has changed....it used to look black and white on the lid...not a darker green breaking on the texture. I did see him make it....it is very white porcelain even when wet.  And  it was slab rolled and applied.  Any idea what the red glaze is? He uses it a lot...I am thinking a clear with Mason 6003

5 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Black underglaze or slip with Mason best black (#6600) or cobalt free (#6666).

But really probably black underglaze if it had nice crisp lines

 

2 hours ago, Dick White said:

The video in the URL starts with a still photo of a lidded box with a black and white top and red chattered sides. I didn't see the vase. The top of the box lid was a slab, textured with a roller, shaped, and then applied to the top of the open thrown cylinder. The glaze on the top of the lid looks to me like a temoku type of dark transparent glaze that breaks clear over the edges of texture,

 

2 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Yep that's glaze breaking over texture, I wouldn't say temmoku just because it's more green than an iron saturate but maybe a celadon or oribe?

 

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On the poster at the start of the video, there’s a bowl with black and white sections with a fine red line between them. Is that the type of decoration you’re trying to re-create?

And  yes, mason stains can be used to colour glazes just like oxides. If it is the bowl’s effect you’re trying to create, that looks like the same satin matte base glaze with different colourants added. 

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Thank you.....yes that is what I am trying to duplicate. What I meant...sorry I was not clear....is can you mix a stain with water and use it like an oxide on bisqueware.....and is this what he is doing here? Or is it being added to a thin slip and then applied. I am thinking that Mason best black. There was also a stain in the "adding colorants " manual here on the site. But it looked pretty complicated and had to be milled for hours and I do not have a mill. 

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26 minutes ago, MFP said:

Thank you.....yes that is what I am trying to duplicate. What I meant...sorry I was not clear....is can you mix a stain with water and use it like an oxide on bisqueware.....and is this what he is doing here? Or is it being added to a thin slip and then applied. I am thinking that Mason best black. There was also a stain in the "adding colorants " manual here on the site. But it looked pretty complicated and had to be milled for hours and I do not have a mill. 

You should mix a bit of flux with it, gerstley or 3134 or something so it will stick when fired.  Otherwise, like oxides they can wipe off after it's bisqued.  Optionally use cmc gum or glycerin to help it brush nicely as well.

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Buying a ready made underglaze would be much easier to deal with that mixing oxides. For black and white, a black underglaze on white clay (porcelain) and a clear glaze is the simplest way to go. White underglaze may or may not work depending on what type of clay you're using. This piece is Speedball black underglaze on cone 6 porcelain:

 

Jar-Circles.jpg

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