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docweathers

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Everything posted by docweathers

  1. Sometime ago I postedan MFA thesis by Frank Vickery on oil spot glazes Oil spot thesis, some of which are amazing. I have been corresponding with him about such things. He has been extremely helpful. He will be running a workshop at John C. Campbell folk school in Brasstown, NC September 22-28, part of which will cover oil spot glazes. He tells me that he will be demonstrating the use of test tiles to do a line blend or progression blend to show colors. He plans to mix a couple as well as bringing some already mixed to experiment with. Besides oil spots will be dealing with the full progression from making to finishing pots. You can see some of his stuff if you search "Frank Vickery pottery" on Facebook
  2. Sometime ago I postedan MFA thesis by Frank Vickery on oil spot glazes Oil spot thesis, some of which are amazing. I have been corresponding with him about such things. He has been extremely helpful. He will be running a workshop at John C. Campbell folk school in Brasstown, NC September 22-28, part of which will cover oil spot glazes. He tells me that he will be demonstrating the use of test tiles to do a line blend or progression blend to show colors. He plans to mix a couple as well as bringing some already mixed to experiment with. Besides oil spots will be dealing with the full progression from making to finishing pots. You can see some of his stuff if you search "Frank Vickery pottery" on Facebook
  3. I love the idea of just sealing it up to keep it wet. It fits with my general emulation of the Peanuts character Pig-pen. Since it's official advice from professional potters, I no longer have to feel guilty about it.
  4. Until today, I had not run my pug mill for a long time. I had forgotten what a mess it is to clean. Has anyone found something easier than a garden hose? Larry
  5. John With that encouragement about Insight, I will start putting in more hours to master it in the level II database. So far I'm quite impressed with it. In some thread you talked about giving demonstrations of throwing 25 to 50 pounds of clay. Have you made any videos of these demonstrations? I can do 25 pounds plus but it is a real workout, even though I'm a big guy. I would like to refine my technique for throwing large. Larry
  6. Marcia Thank you for the list of excellent ceramics glaze books. In response to your prior suggestion, I have bought the Baily book and am reading it. it is excellent. I also have the Insight software, which includes a lot of similar information. Getting around insight is a project in process. Larry
  7. I have used those rare earth magnets on some projects myself and I'm always amazed and sometimes frustrated by how well they stick. do you have any difficulty getting the magnets to slide on the pan to adjust to the diameter of your pot. I have ones on the side of my propane tanks to mark the icing point/ propane level so that I can tell next time I go to fire (after the ice is gone) how much propane I have left. I slide them down as my propane level drops, but sometimes it can be fairly difficult to move even the little ones.
  8. What do commercial glazes have in them that make them so stable that you can successfully fire an 04 at cone 6? what are they doing that we should be doing? Larry
  9. Duh!! Maybe my problem is my familiarity with kitchen chemistry doesn't go much beyond making a hamburger I have a strategy that will utilize the pint-weight idea to assess specific gravity in my mixing container. My standard mixing container is a 32 fluid ounceyogurt container (without yogurt). 1) Weigh the container empty 2) Calibrate a dipstick for the container by pouring successively larger quantities of water into the container. 3) use the dipstick to measure how many fluid ounces I have 4) Weigh the container with my liquid glaze in it. 5) Subtract weight of container from total weight of container and glazes 6) Use pint-weight formula to determine specific gravity Larry
  10. Has anyone tried these oil spot recipes. I've been experimenting with them with mixed results.
  11. I too have noticed that some of the commercial glazes lack depth of color. Since I am a beginner at glaze formulation, I am literally extruding hundreds of test tiles to run line blends in all possible directions. The whole thing seems an immense amount of work, but of course that's the reason we get paid the big money do the glaze recipes that have been successful for you have any common chemistry?
  12. thanks for the suggestions I understand Marc's approach and that is a clever idea that will work fine. I don't understand Day's "Pint Weight" strategy. You say "then weigh 6 oz of the glaze." 6 ounces of glazes always weighs 6 ounces?? I would hope to find a strategy that I can measure the specific gravity of my small amount of glazes in the mixing container versus having to pour it into something else and lose some of it in the process.
  13. When testing glazes I mix 500 g or less. All the hydrometers I've seen are tall thin things that require quite a lot of glazes to get them to float. Does anyone know of a hydrometer useful in small amounts of glazes?
  14. There I seem to be a range of experiences with red stains. It sounds like I will have to include the encapsulated stains in my experiments. one thing that seems eminently clear, these are going to be expensive experiments since stains seem to be outrageously priced. the best prices I have found so far is Axner. Does anyone have a cheaper source?
  15. Compared to the deep crimson color swash on the Mason site, it looks like there's quite a bit of fading. mason colors Are there any better alternatives or techniques?
  16. I have heard that Mason red stains are not stable at cone 6. Does anyone have any experience with Mason or other red stains at cone 6? What kind of red stains are most stable at cone 6? Larry
  17. My favorite ones are made out of hacksaw blades. it's easy, cheap and you can make some really interesting tools.
  18. It is in your browser, not the forum itself. Look in the top row or two of your browser
  19. I've seen your work. If "I always wedge. It's my way of getting to know the clay before I throw it" Is a secret to the beautiful things you create, I will never give up wedging. I always wedge. It's my way of getting to know the clay before I throw it. I've used Walkers, Bluebirds, and homemade puggers. My Peter Pugger is rated as one of the best and I can't tell the diff between clay that has been de-aired and clay that hasn't. There is a lot of discussion to be found about pug mills on this forum if you search "pug mills." Jim
  20. I have a similar but somewhat older version of the pubmill you picture. Instead of the cast aluminum augur chamber mine is a welded steel tube. I could easily weld a little vacuum box on top of that tube. Does yours have the slicing blades that are mentioned in earlier posts? how good a job of de- airing does it do?
  21. I did call bluebird and they don't convert. They say it's more work than they think it's worth. They would rather sell me a new de-airing model. After reading the above descriptions of how a de-airing mill works, I think they may be right. I'm very interested in Jim's comment that he can't tell the difference between when he de-airs and doesn't de-air clay. I've heard that before. I wonder if Marcia and justanassembler would agree. Larry
  22. I have a small old bluebird non de-airing pug mill that I would like to upgrade to de-airing. The part I am puzzled by is how the vent into the paddle chamber is arranged so it can suck out air without getting plugged with clay. Does anyone know how this works or can send me to a reference. Also I understand that old milking machines work as good vacuum pumps. Is this true or do you have any other suggestions for inexpensive vacuum pumps? Thanks Larry
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