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docweathers

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Everything posted by docweathers

  1. One approach I'm going to try is to soak feathers and horsehair in a thin colored slip or water-soluble metal salts such as ferric chloride, cobalt sulfate, copper sulfate or ???. Hopefully when the organic material burns out from the feathers or horsehair it will deposit the colorants and a pattern reflecting the structure of the material. Is there anything else that might be useful to try just so these things in? Is there anything that would makethe feathers and horsehair absorb the colorants better?
  2. I am firing manually with a gas kiln. I have been climbing at about 400° per hour. I have been corresponding with Vickory. He as been very helpful. This is the firing schedule that he recommends 500 degrees an hour to 2100then 100 an hour to 2232, 30 minute hold,500 degrees an hour to 2000, 10 minute hold 500 degrees an hour to 1900, 10 minute hold 500 degrees an hour to 1800, 10 minute hold. I like your cheating idea with granular iron oxide. I will definitely experiment with this. Part of my mixed results is been do to the extreme particularly on vertical surfaces. I'm getting ready to run some line blend tests, as victory does in his thesis, on increasing the dolomite to make it more suitable for vertical surfaces. thanks for the suggestions Larry
  3. thanks for the scoop Since I have sodium silicate and no darvan 7, it would seem that I could substitute about half the amount of sodium silicate that I might've used of Darvan.
  4. Oh well, but thanks for all the information about the dynamics of the problem.
  5. What are the relative merits and demerits of sodium silicate versus darvan 7 as deflocculants?
  6. Is there some way to get the horse hair affect at cone 6 rather than raku?
  7. Where do you get such magnets for $.99 each? Please give a link to the supplier.
  8. Thanks for the glaze recipe. I'm using a gas kiln, so I will try it in both oxidation and reduction. Larry
  9. I emailed Rick Malmgren about this.He states that "It sounds as though you are not getting proper reduction. You need to have the right amount of reduction at the right time in the firing cycle. We go into reduction at cone 010 and maintain it to the end of the firing. You’ll need to experiment with your kiln to get the right results." so the statement in the article that it can be fired "oxidation or reduction" is an accurate.
  10. Look at the picture in the attached PDF. He is getting both the blue-green and copper red in the same bowl.
  11. Here is the recipe. Note that it says oxidation or reduction. I was firing in a gas kiln under oxidation. For those unfamiliar with it, I have also attached the original document. It really has a lot of nice stuff in it. Blue-green / copper red glaze (Cone 6., oxidation or reduction) Talc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 .30 % Whiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 .29 Ferro Frit 3134 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 .33 Kona F-4 Feldspar . . . . . . . . . . . . .46. .16. EPK Kaolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. .40 Silica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16. .52 100 .00 % Add: Tin Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 .24 % Zinc Oxide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 .37 % Black Copper Oxide . . . . . . . . .1 .07 % Covering with clear glaze helps reduce burning out of red . From Rick Malmgren, Ceramics Monthly, October 2000 15cone6recipes.pdf 15cone6recipes.pdf
  12. I tried Rick Malmgren's Blue-green / copper red glaze from 15 tried and true cone 6 glaze recipes. I got a shiny transparent glaze with a slight green tint. Has anyone else tried this glaze, with what result? Any clue how to get the beautiful result that Rick displays it in that article?
  13. I didn't realize that there was an events section. I have posted it there. Thanks Larry
  14. Sometime ago I posted an MFA thesis by Frank Vickery on oil spot glazes Oil spot thesis, some of which are amazing. I have been corresponding with him about such things. He has been extremely helpful. He will be running a workshop at John C. Campbell folk school in Brasstown, NC September 22-28, part of which will cover oil spot glazes. He tells me that he will be demonstrating the use of test tiles to do a line blend or progression blend to show colors. He plans to mix a couple as well as bringing some already mixed to experiment with. Besides oil spots will be dealing with the full progression from making to finishing pots. You can see some of his stuff if you search "Frank Vickery pottery" on Facebook
  15. Sometime ago I postedan MFA thesis by Frank Vickery on oil spot glazes Oil spot thesis, some of which are amazing. I have been corresponding with him about such things. He has been extremely helpful. He will be running a workshop at John C. Campbell folk school in Brasstown, NC September 22-28, part of which will cover oil spot glazes. He tells me that he will be demonstrating the use of test tiles to do a line blend or progression blend to show colors. He plans to mix a couple as well as bringing some already mixed to experiment with. Besides oil spots will be dealing with the full progression from making to finishing pots. You can see some of his stuff if you search "Frank Vickery pottery" on Facebook
  16. Sometime ago I postedan MFA thesis by Frank Vickery on oil spot glazes Oil spot thesis, some of which are amazing. I have been corresponding with him about such things. He has been extremely helpful. He will be running a workshop at John C. Campbell folk school in Brasstown, NC September 22-28, part of which will cover oil spot glazes. He tells me that he will be demonstrating the use of test tiles to do a line blend or progression blend to show colors. He plans to mix a couple as well as bringing some already mixed to experiment with. Besides oil spots will be dealing with the full progression from making to finishing pots. You can see some of his stuff if you search "Frank Vickery pottery" on Facebook
  17. I love the idea of just sealing it up to keep it wet. It fits with my general emulation of the Peanuts character Pig-pen. Since it's official advice from professional potters, I no longer have to feel guilty about it.
  18. Until today, I had not run my pug mill for a long time. I had forgotten what a mess it is to clean. Has anyone found something easier than a garden hose? Larry
  19. John With that encouragement about Insight, I will start putting in more hours to master it in the level II database. So far I'm quite impressed with it. In some thread you talked about giving demonstrations of throwing 25 to 50 pounds of clay. Have you made any videos of these demonstrations? I can do 25 pounds plus but it is a real workout, even though I'm a big guy. I would like to refine my technique for throwing large. Larry
  20. Marcia Thank you for the list of excellent ceramics glaze books. In response to your prior suggestion, I have bought the Baily book and am reading it. it is excellent. I also have the Insight software, which includes a lot of similar information. Getting around insight is a project in process. Larry
  21. I have used those rare earth magnets on some projects myself and I'm always amazed and sometimes frustrated by how well they stick. do you have any difficulty getting the magnets to slide on the pan to adjust to the diameter of your pot. I have ones on the side of my propane tanks to mark the icing point/ propane level so that I can tell next time I go to fire (after the ice is gone) how much propane I have left. I slide them down as my propane level drops, but sometimes it can be fairly difficult to move even the little ones.
  22. What do commercial glazes have in them that make them so stable that you can successfully fire an 04 at cone 6? what are they doing that we should be doing? Larry
  23. Duh!! Maybe my problem is my familiarity with kitchen chemistry doesn't go much beyond making a hamburger I have a strategy that will utilize the pint-weight idea to assess specific gravity in my mixing container. My standard mixing container is a 32 fluid ounceyogurt container (without yogurt). 1) Weigh the container empty 2) Calibrate a dipstick for the container by pouring successively larger quantities of water into the container. 3) use the dipstick to measure how many fluid ounces I have 4) Weigh the container with my liquid glaze in it. 5) Subtract weight of container from total weight of container and glazes 6) Use pint-weight formula to determine specific gravity Larry
  24. Has anyone tried these oil spot recipes. I've been experimenting with them with mixed results.
  25. I too have noticed that some of the commercial glazes lack depth of color. Since I am a beginner at glaze formulation, I am literally extruding hundreds of test tiles to run line blends in all possible directions. The whole thing seems an immense amount of work, but of course that's the reason we get paid the big money do the glaze recipes that have been successful for you have any common chemistry?
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