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I have been reading a bit about making my own IFB to start building my own little kilns. I know it is probably not cost effective but I just want to do it anyway for my own enjoyment.

 

I was working last night in some 3D software with a 9/4.5/3 brick shape trying to work out how to layout bricks and how many I will need. I then realised that I know nothing about brick laying :wacko:  There must be a good way to stack bricks and build up a wall.

 

Anybody got some links to kiln building / brick laying? Going to go to the library tomorrow to see if I can't find a good book on kiln building but thought I would ask here.

 

Any information is good even if it is only slightly related. " I want it all "

Chilly likes this

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IFB do not usually need to be mortared together. Commercial kilns to it to hold it together during shipping, but a kiln built on site does not need mortar. This is true of commercial bricks, but if your home made bricks are not flat and even and consistent, then you'll want to use a thin mortar of firebrick and sand to compensate. Most gas kilns are dry stacked and held together at the corners with angle iron. Walls are typically 9" thick. As for laying the brick, you can do a running bond of the inner and outer layers, then run a header or soldier course that ties them together every 5-7 rows. If you lay it all out properly, you won't have to cut very many bricks.

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Thanks Neil. So I have two layers of running bonds and then every 5 rows up a run of bricks across the top?

 

If I just want one bricks thickness I can just do a running bond and the floor another running bond? Is 4.5" enough insulation for a kiln no more that 2 cubic ft?

 

Something like this.

post-23281-0-67499700-1395368159_thumb.jpeg

post-23281-0-67499700-1395368159_thumb.jpeg

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Or build around with common brick and fill with vermiculite or other insulative....

 

What's roof going to be made of

 

Also single single layer floor will perform poorly compared to thicker floor. What's your floor pattern?

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A single layer of floor is much too thin. At least 2 layers are needed, preferably three. A single wall layer will work if you have powerful burners to compensate for the lack of insulation. My raku kiln is only 1 layer of brick, but it's got enough power for a kiln 4 times its size. I would use fiber board instead of blanket as a backup layer. It's rigid and easier to work with.

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IFB does benefit from a skim coat of refectory coating.  The high carbon monoxide content of fuel gas firing tends to age IFB prematurely.  There are a number of coating which will also improve the efficiency of your Kiln.  Any area  with direct flame contact should be lined with standard fire brick or minimally coated with refectory cement. 

The suggestion of surrounding the kiln with insulating blanket is excellent.   There is a hardener which will firm the outer layer of ISB  and make it more stable.  In the past I have built shelters around my units from salvaged galvanized duct work and never found the metal dangerously hot when protecting layers of ISB/IFB. 

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Ok, all sound like good ideas for upping the insulation. The fiber board does look good.

 

No idea about the best way to do the roof. Not even sure what size internal capacity I am looking for. I have guessed between 1-2 cubic feet. I want it to be powered by 13amp plug socket 240v. The largest one you can buy seemed to be around 1.5 cubic feet just electric powered.

 

It is going to be an electric reduction downdraft kiln powered with elements and bunsen burners. Looked at a few designs and thought this one could be the best. Simon Leach has a similar one to this which I used.

 

Just noticed the flue hole / bricks are missing  :huh:

 

My very first concept drawing. Needs a lot of work.

post-23281-0-67554200-1395425034_thumb.jpg

post-23281-0-67554200-1395425034_thumb.jpg

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