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Found 230 results

  1. Hi everyone! I just recently bought a used Cress FX27P electric kiln so I can start firing work at home. So I just recently started my first bisque firing yesterday at 4pm. It was more of a test fire, so I didn't put a lot of work in there, about 15 wheel thrown pieces. There were a couple pieces in there that were not fully bone dry so I set the firing speed at E, the slowest speed. I also put a pyrometric cone (04) in the sitter, 1 peep hole open, and set the thumb wheel to 1, and I set the timer to 16 hours so it can shut off at that time in case anything goes wrong. Throughout the day and night I checked periodically, and the kiln did get red hot, so the elements seemed fine to me, but I didn't take a look at the thumbwheel. So this morning I went to go check on the kiln, and it fired the full 16 hours! and the kiln sitter didn't go off, so the the kiln didn't reach cone 04 temp. Also, the thumbwheel stayed at 1! It didn't move! So I'm thinking the thumbwheel is broken or needs repair, I didn't put the cone in right, or something is wrong with the elements. And even 16 plus hours later the kiln was still showing orange to red heat signatures inside the peep hole. So I talked to my friend who has experience firing kilns, and he said to just fire the thing until the kiln sitter shuts off and set the thumbwheel to 10 max temp as soon as possible so the kiln doesn't have to reheat back to 1000 for the sake of energy efficiency. If anyone has any ideas, input, advice, or suggestions I'd greatly appreciate it! I'm hoping to bisque fire and glaze fire using this kiln in the near future, I already bought a couple pints of cone 6 glazes to test out. Thanks!
  2. I bought a used Cress FX-1414P semi automatic electric kiln so that I can fire pieces at home due to quarantine. The previous owner did not have a manual and Cress is giving me minimal info and do not have manuals for this old of a model nor are there any available online. The kiln works. I 'm ready to do my first fire but would like to know if anyone has this kiln or one similar to it and any resources I can look at to better understand how to set it and operate it according to type of clay and cone. Any info would help! Though this is not my first time operating a kiln, this is my first personal kiln. Thanks! - Cristina
  3. I got this old Paragon kiln for free from someone who had it sitting in their garage for a long time (15 years maybe?). I'm pretty amateur, but I'd love to get more into ceramics and firing/how to upkeep my equipment and safely. Could someone tell me how to go about making sure this kiln is safe for use? The wires look pretty good as far as I can tell, but I'd have no idea if they weren't apart from if they were rusted. There's cracking in the bricks, will that be a problem? (I haven't even cleaned it at all yet and sorry that the photos are blurry)
  4. Hello! I’m a newbie on this forum; happy to have finally made an account! I have been doing ceramics for a couple years and am finally taking the plunge for my first kiln. I found a used Skutt SK 818 on craigslist, one owner who bought it new. Model: 818-240 , Phase 1, 240V, 40 Amps, Cone 10 It fits the bill specs wise for me, albeit a little smaller than I would have preferred but still good. The only concern i have is it looks like the bricks on the inside look kind of rough. Drip stains on the floor and walls but the coils look really straight up at least as far as i can see on the photos. Haven’t gone to see it in person yet since they are about 3 hrs away and wanna make sure its a good deal before I do. Should i be concerned with the look of the bricks? Pictures below! Price is $475 with stand and other accessories. Thank you in advance for all for your knowledge and advice! Cynthia
  5. Hello everyone, I've started dabbling in pottery about three years ago, making bonsai pots. This fits with another hobby of mine, you can guess which :). Point is, after firing my works with some acquaintances, I've decided that my own kiln is a must in order to really progress in the craft. The problem is that I my backwater location the chances of buying a second hand one are next to none, and I can't really justify spending almost $2500 for a new one. So I came up with the idea of actually building one from scratch. Yes, I know it's hard, yes, I know it can be dangerous but I'm trying to be as smart about it as I can and mitigate all the risks as much as I can. I would really appreciate it if you ladies and gentlemen would be willing to part with some knowledge to help me have the best possible outcome for this project. Now for the tech specs: In order to fit the nature of my work, I would need a 50x40x30cm interior. (19.7x15.7x12 inches) The temps needed would be around 1240°C (2264°F) The power I can get away with as a household consumer in my location is 230V 16A ~ 3600W This takes me to my first point: As far as internet wisdom goes, the Wattage needed for a pottery kiln is 0.6W/cm2 which would place me at a needed Wattage of around 5600W. Waaaay above what I can provide. But then I read specs for kilns produced on Germany like Nabertherm that for a 60L pottery kiln with a top temperature of 1300°C produce single phase 230V 16A models, which makes me believe I can do it. I'm assuming that I'll need to go with more insulation and longer firing times, but it's doable. Is that accurate? Next up, elements: luckily I have a provider for Kanthal A1 wire near me and prices are decent. Would 1.6mm 1380°C max, 0,721 Ohm/m be suitable? With this diameter I seem to be able to juggle the resistance, wattage, length and placement of elements as close to optimal, with 2 elements running in parallel. Thirdly the most amusing topic... Well not amusing but maybe the most complex. The controller. Being in IT i'm a sucker for gadgets. Usually buying them, true, but this time I'm thinking about building :). I saw a lot of projects on the web with Raspberry Pi kiln controllers. The features they provide, the adaptability and the connectivity of the systems sounds amazing. Question is: does anyone fire with something like this? How does it compare to commercial controllers that are super expensive and in the stone age as far as features go. Are they worth the trouble? An example project that stuck with me is below. But there are many more Thanks for the help, and looking forward to chatting with you. Mihai
  6. I am new to owning a kiln. I have enough work to fire my first bisque, and am just waiting for a few more pieces to dry enough. My question is, do any of you ever fire your kiln less than full? I would love to run some smaller tests, but I hear it's not a good practice. Would love to hear what others think.
  7. Hello all! Been following the community for the last few months and I have a question that I'd like to get your input on. I've been doing ceramics as a hobby and while I have access to a large potter's studio nearby where I can get larger pieces fired I'd like to buy my first kiln that I can use in my work studio for small batch pieces. I like to explore both handbuilding/carving/throwing for tablewares for personal use and make small non-functional sculptures. As my studio is a rental, I can't really install 240v circuits which limits to a few options. What I'm working with is a dedicated 120V, 30 amps circuit for the kiln. I'm currently debating between Olympic MAS 129E and Skutt KM 614-3. I like the Olympic over the Skutt because it can fire up to cone 8 (vs. cone 6 for Skutt) whereas I like the Skutt because it's slightly bigger (0.8 cf vs 0.56 cf) and I've been reading that Skutt in general has better user experience over Olympic. If you were to choose between the two, which one would you choose? What matters more? Thank you so much!
  8. Hey guys, so tomorrow I'll make a kiln with oil can (yes it's already washed) and pit firing, I'm trying to post a pic of it but the forum sucks at uploading it, so I'll try to explain: The idea is to dig a hole on the ground where I'm going to put the fire (wood and sawdust, and yes, there's room for the oxygen to get in), then I'll put a grill over it where pieces are going to be placed, I'll also put sawdust on them with some wood, then the oil can will be put over them to isolate the heat. That's my idea, what do you guys think? Will it work? Also, there's a hole on the top of the can with about 10cm diameter, do you think I should close it or not? Thanks. *forgot to say that it's to bisquefire pieces
  9. I have been trying to be scientific about arranging my firing schedule in a small electric kiln with a controller. I understand the concept of heatwork and use cones on all shelves in my kiln to monitor results. I soak at top temperature and fire down so want to compensate for the additional heatwork these procedures involve when I set the top temperature on my controller. I understood that this could be done by looking at the area under a graph of total heatwork, but having compared theoretical models using the Orton cone firing tables, if this is indeed the case, I must be missing something. The following example uses °C, as I am in the UK, and I am referring to the Orton theoretical temperature values. 1. In the Orton table Cone 7 is reached at 1237°C when firing at 60°C /hr, if this is a straight ramp, this would take 20.3hrs, assuming a starting room temp of 17°C ((1237-17)/60). If the x-axis is time and the y-axis temperature, the area under the graph is a triangle and can be calculated as (1237 x 20.3)/2 = 12,555 2. When firing at 150°C/hr cone 7 is reached at 1255°C. As a straight ramp this would take 8.25hrs ((1255-17)/150). Then the area under the graph is also a triangle calculated as (1255x8.25)/2 = 5179 SO, these areas which are supposed to represent total heatwork to achieve cone 7 are not the same. I am clearly missing something here. Can anyone help please. Thank you
  10. Since March, I haven't been able to fire any of my work because my school is closed, and that's where the kiln I use is. I was lucky enough to be able to bring a wheel home with me and I've been using it every day. So the consequence is that I have an abundance of unfired pottery. I've searched everywhere for an open studio or someone who might let me use their home kiln, but nothing came up. I've considered buying a kiln of my own but I have nowhere near enough money and no source of income right now. Does anyone have ANY suggestions? Please help haha I'm losing my mind!
  11. Hi Guys, I have a small test kiln from paragon that has one peep hole and no vent. Everyone that I have contacted says that small test kilns don't need to be vented, just prop the lid open for the first few hours of firing and then close it. I have not had any success with this. I tried keeping it propped open until it reaches 1400 degrees, however it never reaches that temperature probably because the heat is escaping. It's mainly affecting my red glazes right now, however all of my glazes come out very dark and the red ones look burnt and brown ALL the time. After doing a lot of research, I can only guess that its because there isn't proper ventilation happening inside of the kiln. Is there a way that I can vent the kiln myself? I can't really afford an actual venting system right now, and I don't even know if those would work on my kiln because it's so small. Does anyone have any recommendations?
  12. Hi, My wife managed to twist and snap this! Can anyone tell me what it called exactly as I cant seem to find replacements on t'interweb. If anyone has any surefire (sic) ways of repairing it, then that would be helpful too. It is to sit in the top vent hole of a Cromartie portable kiln (Hobbytech 40) and have a thermocouple through it (trying to build a Raspberry Pi controller). Cheers Andy
  13. Hi all, I am trying to buy a versatile kiln for small projects at home, and the roderveld pyramid kiln with the gas and wood firing bases seems like a good choice for bisque, raku and stoneware glaze firing with the versatility to give me a variety of effects. The only problem is that I can't find any references from anyone who has ever used one, and it's a load of money to spend on something without having any idea whether it will do all the things I want (basically I don't have unlimited space so I want a kiln that can do as much as possible, I want to try a variety of techniques, and I don't really want to fire an electric kiln). Can anyone tell me if they have used one and if it's a good piece of kit? Thanks
  14. Background: I made oval earrings (oval shape with large oval cutout so they are more like an oval outline) (15 pairs) on the claybody Highwater Clays Little Loafers (Cone 6). I painted designs on them with Amaco underglazes. The tops of each have small holes (i'll put metal hoops them after they are all done). They have already been bisque fired. I also have three other pairs of earrings that have only small earrings. Goal: Now, I want to put a clear glaze on them and glaze fire them. Ideally, in one batch. What I have in my possession vs. what I could acquire. The clear glaze I already have is a Zinc-free Cone 5/6 glaze. However, I can get a different, low-fire clear glaze. I also have a bead rack I borrowed with some long rods that are too large for the small holes in the earrings. My question: I found this image online, in which someone made oval earrings very similar to mine and a bead rack with hooks. It appears they used kiln safe metal wire to make hooks. The hooks appear to be large but small enough to fit through small holes. I wonder what your opinion of that is. I'd have to figure out what gauge to get. A ceramicist nearby has a jewelry tree so I may take the bisquefired earrings over to her and try to see how they fit on her jewelry tree and that might tell me approx. the size wire those jewelry trees use and I could get the same gaugue, bend and make hooks out of them to hang on the rods. One potter has said this ^ should work if I order some nichrome or kanthal wire. They also think it would be fine to do with the Cone 6 clear glaze I have and would be fine to fire up to a Cone 6 (although we actually do Cone 5). Part of me wonders if I should just get low-fire glaze, try the hook thing, and low fire it to be on the safer side. Other solution: As I typed this, I just realized a possible other solution…1.) get a low fire brushable glaze, 2.) simply put rods through the large oval (taking care not to glaze the inside edge or anywhere where the rod will rest) instead of worrying about the small circles at all. It’s not as ideal but would probably hardly be noticeable. 3.) Fire at a low temp 04-06. That might work for the oval earrings but not for the winking eyes.
  15. I have a question regarding some theory I read in the text The Kiln Book. On page 78 of the 4th Edition, it states that: "At the point where the exit flues enter the chimney, they should be restricted so that the chimney cross section is larger than this flue area" In the diagram (3-11) beneath this, it shows decreasing the point of entry to the chimney by 25% (from 4 bricks to 3), coming from the kiln exit flue. What's the thought behind this? I'm happy to trust my elders, but I'd also like to know what the theory is. I'm curious how this decrease affects the firing, vs keeping the same area of flow in the inlet flue>exit flue>chimney entry>chimney. As I'm building a chimney coming up in the next couple weeks, I'd love to figure this out. I can taper in the walls of the exit flue to the entry point of the chimney, which would accelerate flow heading into the chimney (while also creating slight backpressure?), which would then open back up to the full area of the chimney as it rises. Thoughts? Thanks in advance!
  16. Hi! I was running a cone 5 glaze with my skutt electric kiln and forgot to turn on my enviro vent. When I realized it was already finished and at 500F. I have the KMT so was able to see a graph of the firing which looked fine, but it did fire in 4 hrs instead of the regular 13hrs. What problems could this cause ??? Could this hurt my kiln for future firings? Vent is on now and another fan in the studio cause it definitely smells. Thanks!
  17. Hello everyone, I have bought a second-hand electric Rohde 5024 Kiln (230V) and a TR 305 controller. I have done only 2 biscuit firing at 950C and noticed the pieces were almost vitrified; our mocal clay is rich in iron oxide. I recently did a slow glaze firing at 900C and my work melted down, some kiln shelves are distorted and even broken by the heat. The kiln electric plug is stick to the wall socket.Do you have an idea of what has happened? The whole situation is devastating as I live in West Africa and do not have potters, technicians or manufacturers who know about electric kilns. I have contacted the manufacturer and they said they could not help. I am not familiar with kilns and hope someone could help with the matter.Thank you so much in advance
  18. Hi, I am looking for some advise if possible. I fired my kiln last night but the kiln didn't reach full temperature. I looked at the cone I have in my cone stand and it is not melted. The cone in the sitter either melted or fell off and the kiln shut off. Can I re-fire? As I have not unloaded it, can I just turn it on? Thanks Mal
  19. Hi, I am new to ceramic glazing. Are there any methods that can duplicate fire-based glazing on ceramics? I work at home, so i do not have access to kiln. I have read there are oven-based glazes and non-fire based glaze. How effective are they in terms of the glaze (will it be similar to fire glazed plate)? Thank You.
  20. have inherited a Gare Kiln Model # 1210 Serial # 10.7.84 hertz 60 volts 240 watts 3120 Amperes 13 inf phase single and I need your help pricing it. It’s better than used condition but not new. I would say used 5 times total and has the stand, all working parts, etc. I have someone wanting to buy it, but I can’t find any information online to compare too. Please help your girl out!
  21. Hi all, I'm planning on building a hobby kiln for my partner, and am in the process of choosing refractory materials and kanthal wire for the heating element. Was hoping I could get some advice from anybody who knows about these things. I want the kiln to be light weight and very efficient. I'd like to use ceramic fibre board as an inner layer of insulation (rated to 1400 C / 2550 F), and calcium silicate board as a secondary layer (rated to 1000 C / 1830 F). The ceramic fibre board is very expensive compared to the calcium silicate board, but i can't only use the calcium silicate board as it's only rated to 1000 C / 1830 F. So my idea is to cement the two boards together, with the calcium silicate board on the outside, so that it won't exceed 1000 C / 1830 F. I'm wondering how thick the ceramic fibre board needs to be such that the calcium silicate doesn't reach that temperature. We'll be firing the kiln to about 1280 C / 2340 F. My other question is about kanthal wire for the heating elements. I'm wondering what gauge of wire I need. The kiln will be about 40 litres / 1.3 cubic feet. I want it to get up to 1280 C / 2340 F. Based on similar designs that I've seen online, it looks like I'd need it run at about 3600 watts. I'm wondering what gauge kanthal wire I should use for a well-insulated kiln that meets these specs. If anyone has any idea about either of these questions I'd really appreciate your thoughts! P.S. I'm aware of the health risks of working with fibreboard, and will be using the proper PPE and precautions.
  22. When I am firing my electric kiln, I start with the lid propped open about 2 inches and the top peephole out. Then at around 1000 degrees F I shut the lid. The top peephole is open the whole time. I understand that the lid needs to be propped to allow moisture and gasses to escape in the early stages of firing. My questions are: 1) is 1000F an appropriate temp to close the lid? 2) Is it necessary to prop the lid on a ^6 glaze firing as well as the bisque, or only during the bisque (^06) I have been firing this way for a couple years and the pots always come out well. However the lid has badly cracked on both the inside and outside, necessitating repair with kiln cement. I have a large electric Skutt Kiln (I think it's the 1227). Even with my repair, it is all fractured and occasionally falls onto the pots below. The metal handle is also badly rusted and corroded, an issue I didn't notice when I bought this kiln used a couple years ago. I notice when I close the lid on an 1000F kiln it makes a soft settling crackling noise. I am curious if the cracking lid is from thermal shock when it goes from hot room temp to 1000F. Because of this, i wonder if it's better not to close it so late (and hot) in the firing. Perhaps it's just time for an envirovent. Is it normal for a lid to start to deteriorate like this? The newer versions of my kiln are made with the hydraulic lid lifter, which I assume lifts it more evenly, without the torque from supporting it on just one part. Please let me know if anyone else has had this cracking lid issue. -Dana
  23. Hello, I finally feel comfortable with the number of tests I have run to share this information and make a definitive conclusion and recommendation. I have run 34 firing tests with burping and contrasted the results with 28 firings without burping. THIS IS ONLY A PROCESS FOR GLAZING. DOING THIS FOR BISQUE MAY CAUSE CRACKS. I HAVE NOT TESTED ON ONCE-FIRED WORK. Firstly, what do I mean when saying "burping kilns." The term comes from Raku (where I got started with pottery). Burping Raku is when you let oxygen into the container/ditch that you have your raku pieces sitting, many other potters, and I have found it to allow the glazes to become more active and colorful. However, that is not what I am referring to here. I am going to share with you my process to have your ceramics be more resistant to crawling. Process: Firstly, I do a slow ramp of my glaze loads (100-150 degrees/hour) to 250 degrees to allow for moisture to leave the pots. However, this is not a slow enough ramp and high enough temperature to completely rid your pieces of water and holding at such a low temperature adds unnecessary time to firings. So, every 150-200 degrees until about 700 degrees, I pop open the lid of my kiln for ten-fifteen seconds to allow for moisture to be released. Now, you are surely asking, "Why?" and "Will this damage my elements?" Why? - When I have burped the kiln, I have found glazes less likely to crawl. I also have found it less likely for the melt on glazes to be uneven. Will this damage your elements? - From what I have found, I have seen no stress on the elements. I have measured the time of firings and the life of the elements over two different sets, testing between burping and no burping. The process is incredibly easy- Know your ramp speeds, and calculate when your kiln will progress every 150 or 200 degrees, and go to your kiln with a pair of gloves and open the lid quickly. Do as many times as you would like until you hit 650/700 degrees. Anything over 700 will not work. (Little side note- If you wear glasses, take them off before doing this. It is incredibly foggy and can probably melt the plastic) Please try this on your own and let me know if you find this process to work for you and your glazes. To my knowledge, no one has written about this, and I have come up with this process myself. If this is a process that someone has written about, please let me know, for I do not want to take credit for something that isn't mine, even something as minuscule as opening the lid of your kiln.
  24. The kiln is giving me an E1 error. Can I fix this myself? How?
  25. Hi ! I am so glad I found this forum. I am trying to kick start a ceramic club. Here at our facility we have our Kiln room that is fully equipped, completed with endless amount of supplies. I really hit the mother load, however this room has not been utilized in ten(10) years or so. We have EVERYTHING, but nothing has an expiration date. I've been into ceramics since high school, unfortunately this is just something I am not familiar with. Most of our supplies are either Mayco or Duncan Bisque, I might call customer service to check with them about their under glazes, glazes, paints and such. But if you have any tips, advice on anything that might help. We have our kiln that is practically brand new it just needs love. Also does anyone know if porcelain or earthenware that has been here that long is still good to use and if so how to give it life. I know this is a lot, any help is welcomed thank you in advanced
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