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Waterproofing Pit Fired Slab Vases


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#1 Isculpt

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 12:26 AM

First, I want to say how much I appreciate you folks (you know who you are!) who take the time to answer questions from newbies like me who have read every book we can get our hands on, and yet still have a zillion questions.

I am working with Max paper clay from Axner, which can fire to cone 6, although I usually only fire it to 06. I've just finished making a few slab flower vases with carved human faces, but a studio potter friend told me that "earthenware" is never truly waterproof. I hope that this isn't true! I usually use underglazes, which I sometimes follow with a clear cone 06 glaze. My intention was to pit fire these vases, but it has just occurred to me that I don't know how to proceed to smoke the pots and also make them waterproof. Any suggestions? Or am I stuck with some vases-turned-pencil holders?? thanks, Jayne

#2 Aussie Lyn

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 05:05 AM

First, I want to say how much I appreciate you folks (you know who you are!) who take the time to answer questions from newbies like me who have read every book we can get our hands on, and yet still have a zillion questions.

I am working with Max paper clay from Axner, which can fire to cone 6, although I usually only fire it to 06. I've just finished making a few slab flower vases with carved human faces, but a studio potter friend told me that "earthenware" is never truly waterproof. I hope that this isn't true! I usually use underglazes, which I sometimes follow with a clear cone 06 glaze. My intention was to pit fire these vases, but it has just occurred to me that I don't know how to proceed to smoke the pots and also make them waterproof. Any suggestions? Or am I stuck with some vases-turned-pencil holders?? thanks, Jayne



#3 Aussie Lyn

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 05:14 AM

First, I want to say how much I appreciate you folks (you know who you are!) who take the time to answer questions from newbies like me who have read every book we can get our hands on, and yet still have a zillion questions.

I am working with Max paper clay from Axner, which can fire to cone 6, although I usually only fire it to 06. I've just finished making a few slab flower vases with carved human faces, but a studio potter friend told me that "earthenware" is never truly waterproof. I hope that this isn't true! I usually use underglazes, which I sometimes follow with a clear cone 06 glaze. My intention was to pit fire these vases, but it has just occurred to me that I don't know how to proceed to smoke the pots and also make them waterproof. Any suggestions? Or am I stuck with some vases-turned-pencil holders?? thanks, Jayne



#4 Aussie Lyn

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 05:17 AM

Hi there I teach ceramics in Aus. What we use for waterproofing is a product called "Bondcrete" from any hardware shops. To stop dirt and for easy cleaning for outdoor ceramics use it one third Bondcrete to two thirds water. For pots without glaze for more waterproofing try half bondcrete and half water. It dries clear, the more bondcrete you use the more shiny it will look. Hope this helps. Cheers Aussie Lyn

#5 Isculpt

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 07:25 PM

Hi there I teach ceramics in Aus. What we use for waterproofing is a product called "Bondcrete" from any hardware shops. To stop dirt and for easy cleaning for outdoor ceramics use it one third Bondcrete to two thirds water. For pots without glaze for more waterproofing try half bondcrete and half water. It dries clear, the more bondcrete you use the more shiny it will look. Hope this helps. Cheers Aussie Lyn


That sounds wonderful! I've never heard of it, but I'm going to start searching for it on the internet. Thanks, Jayne

#6 Isculpt

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 08:32 PM

Hi there I teach ceramics in Aus. What we use for waterproofing is a product called "Bondcrete" from any hardware shops. To stop dirt and for easy cleaning for outdoor ceramics use it one third Bondcrete to two thirds water. For pots without glaze for more waterproofing try half bondcrete and half water. It dries clear, the more bondcrete you use the more shiny it will look. Hope this helps. Cheers Aussie Lyn


Well, Lynn, I haven't been able to find this product anyplace but Australia, but I'm going to keep looking. My guess is that it is sold under a different name here. I found a "Bondcrete Squeezepack", which seems to be a 500 ml plastic bottle. And I found an FX-Bondcrete. Which are you recommending?

#7 laurent

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 04:02 AM

First, I want to say how much I appreciate you folks (you know who you are!) who take the time to answer questions from newbies like me who have read every book we can get our hands on, and yet still have a zillion questions.

I am working with Max paper clay from Axner, which can fire to cone 6, although I usually only fire it to 06. I've just finished making a few slab flower vases with carved human faces, but a studio potter friend told me that "earthenware" is never truly waterproof. I hope that this isn't true! I usually use underglazes, which I sometimes follow with a clear cone 06 glaze. My intention was to pit fire these vases, but it has just occurred to me that I don't know how to proceed to smoke the pots and also make them waterproof. Any suggestions? Or am I stuck with some vases-turned-pencil holders?? thanks, Jayne


I don't know if it exists in your country, but if you find it the best is IN2210 from RUBSON (but it stinks a lot during few days) or if you don't have glaze inside of the vase you can use IN2230 from RUBSON. For both of them you let the product in the vase for 10 minutes about, then you let it dry few days and it will be waterproof...

Laurent(sorry for my very bad english)

#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:15 PM

A liquid silicon like you use to make dry flies works for sealing.
Annie's Mud Shop in Cincinnati used to sell it in a spray bottle.

Marcia

#9 Diane Puckett

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 05:35 PM

A liquid silicon like you use to make dry flies works for sealing.
Annie's Mud Shop in Cincinnati used to sell it in a spray bottle.

Marcia

My husband would pitch a fit if I took that from his fly fishing gear.:-)
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#10 Kohaku

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 06:41 AM

Of the options you guys have mentioned- how long do they hold up?

I've thought about doing this to Raku pieces... but hate to sell something as impermeable if it's going to wear out down the road...
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#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 06:45 AM

You'll have to test it for yourself on your claybody and firing process.

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#12 Kohaku

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Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:07 AM

You'll have to test it for yourself on your claybody and firing process.

Marcia


Sure... but most sealants have a fairly specific half-life when exposed to things like UV light or acidic liquids. Just curious as to whether anyone was aware of of the overall durability of these things.
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#13 Idaho Potter

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 03:46 PM

I've never done this, but have friends who produce ceramic lotion and liquid soap bottles that they use a sealer on the inside. They've told me it is sold at our local clay supplier here in Boise. Ask your local supplier and they will have the skinny on durability and application.

Shirley

#14 Mark C.

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 07:18 AM

I've never done this, but have friends who produce ceramic lotion and liquid soap bottles that they use a sealer on the inside. They've told me it is sold at our local clay supplier here in Boise. Ask your local supplier and they will have the skinny on durability and application.

Shirley


This type of sealer does not work well for lotion bottles. I have had more customer complainants of this product over the years than I can recall. Glaze is what works and is all I have ever used as its a postitive stop for moisture.
You can seal them with this for short periods but its not a forever fix.
Mark
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#15 OffCenter

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 08:31 AM


I've never done this, but have friends who produce ceramic lotion and liquid soap bottles that they use a sealer on the inside. They've told me it is sold at our local clay supplier here in Boise. Ask your local supplier and they will have the skinny on durability and application.

Shirley


This type of sealer does not work well for lotion bottels. I have had more customer complainants of this product over the years than I can recall. Glaze is what works and is all I have ever used as its a postitive stop for moisture.
You can seal them with this for short periods but its not a forever fix.
Mark


While Mark obviously knows what works for him, I disagree with his advice to rely on glaze to stop leaks. The clay body should not leak. For stoneware and porcelain you should never depend on the glaze to stop a leak. A cylinder with no glaze on it should not leak. Almost no glaze fits the clay body it is on so perfectly as to not have some crackle (even if microscopic) that will let water through (even it it is a very slow leak). That may be fine for lotion bottles but a vase sitting on a grand piano will eventually leak if the clay is not vitrified despite the glaze. But, then, I'm referring to stoneware and porcelain. I don't know what potters who work in earthenware do to seal their majolica vases.

Jim
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#16 Mark C.

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 11:52 AM

Let me restate this-
My customers have said they bought lotion bottles at shows from others that have sealer and they leak oils -soaps whatever they put into it. The piano is ruined and the wood counter has rings and they are not happy with poor work-this is the real world and folks just do not test enough and sell crap that does not work.Much of my job is educating customers to ask questions and learn what to look for.I use vitrified porcelain with glaze interiors which does not leak. The clay is not pourous and the glaze fits well .I never have heard of a sealer that works well on unvitrived clay.
Now for sealing pit fired work you will not get it vitrified so micky mouse sealers is all you can do. They will not work long or well its part of pit fired wares-they are weak and porous not to be made funtional. Makr non funtional pit fired work and all will be happy and Jims piano will not have rings.
Mark
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#17 OffCenter

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:06 PM

I just have a problem with you writing that "Glaze is what works and is all I have ever used as its a postitive stop for moisture" because that may make some beginning potters think they can depend on glaze to waterproof a pot. For stoneware and porcelain glaze should not be depended on as a "stop for moisture". The clay fired to maturity should be depended on as the "stop for moisture".

Jim
E pur si muove.

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#18 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 02:17 PM

Back to pit fired slab vases. A silicon sealer would work for a while but probably not forever. There would probably be a need to re-coat it just as one reseals wood decks.
I prefer to think of the pit fired process as non-functional and work on beautiful surfaces that are more interesting than functional.


Marcia

#19 Krebs Pottery

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 05:48 PM

use a plastic liner inside of the vessel and you have the problem solved without the use of sealants that may not work over time.
~Cheryl

#20 DAY

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 08:22 AM

Back to pit fired slab vases. A silicon sealer would work for a while but probably not forever. There would probably be a need to re-coat it just as one reseals wood decks.
I prefer to think of the pit fired process as non-functional and work on beautiful surfaces that are more interesting than functional.


Marcia


I have been TOLD that oil lamps need a sealer inside, since the fuel will find its way through the most minute cracks in the glaze. several supply houses sell such a product. Will it work on unvitrified ware? Who knows. . .




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