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Firing Too Dark/uneven


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#1 akin4843

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:57 AM

I am using a Skutt Manual Kiln (Lo/Med/High Knobs) and this is my second glaze firing on the kiln. The first batch came out where I'm pretty sure I over fired because they all came out brown. Well this time I stopped the kiln (sitter is broken) earlier to see what happens and I noticed that the color of some pots are "ok" while others are still too dark. You can see below and example. In the pic those two bowls are the same glaze color (croc blue/coyote) but the one on the right is just way to dark. I forgot to note what part of the kiln the pots were stationed so I can't rule out uneven elements....although the elements are new. Also, this was done at cone 6. I was wondering if I fired at cone 5 would I get better results...Not sure what to do here as I have little knowledge of kilns and this old manual kiln was all I can afford at the moment..Any ideas/suggestions? Thanks in advance!

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#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:23 AM

Looks to be more of a glaze thickness issue . . . the one that looks too dark probably had too thin of a glaze application; the nice blue one had a better thickness. 



#3 mregecko

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:45 AM

I agree it's a glaze thickness issue.

 

This appears to be a pretty typical floating blue glaze (or blue rutile, or whatever you want to call it).

 

They pretty much always go on brown where their application is thin.

 

And, in my experience, cone six floating blues are very resilient to changes in temperature up or down a cone. They will still come out blue, just with a different visual texture.



#4 neilestrick

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:49 AM

Agreed, glaze should be thicker to get the blue.


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#5 Roberta12

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:06 PM

I agree, because I have done that myself.  Too thin of an application, and bingo!  It's brown.



#6 akin4843

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:08 PM

Oh thanks guys......I was so worried it was an issue w/ the temp in my kiln. When I mixed my glaze I think I ended up thinning it out too much. Is there a way to thicken it back up again, or should I add more dry powder to the mix?



#7 Chris Campbell

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:12 PM

One way to get water out of a glaze is to hang a cloth on the rim with one edge just touching the glaze ... The water will wick up the towel without disturbing your glaze. This works well with slips too.

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#8 akin4843

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:44 PM

One way to get water out of a glaze is to hang a cloth on the rim with one edge just touching the glaze ... The water will wick up the towel without disturbing your glaze. This works well with slips too.

 

Are you referring to the rim of the glaze bucket, or the rim of the glazed pot? Just clarifying....



#9 Roberta12

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 06:11 PM

That is brilliant Chris!!  Never thought of that.  Thanks!



#10 Matt Oz

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 07:24 PM

Chris Campbell Ms. Wizard



#11 Chris Campbell

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:21 PM

 

One way to get water out of a glaze is to hang a cloth on the rim with one edge just touching the glaze ... The water will wick up the towel without disturbing your glaze. This works well with slips too.

 

Are you referring to the rim of the glaze bucket, or the rim of the glazed pot? Just clarifying....

 

The rim of the glaze bucket.


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#12 Pam S

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:56 PM

Coyote glazes are great when applied properly. When they suggest thick application, they MEAN thick.


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#13 oldlady

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:06 PM

great reminder, chris.  gotta do that with this year's overspray bucket. thanks! :P


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#14 akin4843

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 09:27 AM

Thanks Chris and everyone else...I will try this!



#15 Bob Coyle

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 09:15 PM

Wow Chris... I'll bet this will work to get the last standing water out of a bucket of raw clay I dug up and slacked without pouring off any of the fines. Thanks!






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